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281 - 290 of 766 results for: all courses

ENGLISH 161: Narrative and Narrative Theory

An introduction to stories and storytelling--that is, to narrative. What is narrative? When is narrative fictional and when non-fictional? How is it done, word by word, sentence by sentence? Must it be in prose? Can it be in pictures? How has storytelling changed over time? Focus on various forms, genres, structures, and characteristics of narrative.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 167H: The Ethical Gangster

(English majors must register for 5 units) A study of recent developments in understanding human moral psychology using mafia movies to explore the differences between Kantian and Utilitarian moral theory. We will study the greatest hits of gangster fiction and film, from Fielding's Jonathan Wild to The Sopranos.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

ENGLISH 168: Imagining the Oceans (COMPLIT 168, FRENCH 168)

How has Western culture constructed the world's oceans since the beginning of global ocean exploration? How have imaginative visions of the ocean been shaped by marine science, technology, exploration, commerce and leisure? Authors read might include Cook, Equiano, and Steinbeck; Defoe, Verne, Stevenson, Conrad, Woolf and Hemingway; Coleridge, Baudelaire, Moore, Bishop and Walcott. Films by Painlevé and Bigelow. Seminar co-ordinated with a spring 2015 Cantor Arts Center public exhibition. Visits to Cantor; other possible field trips include Hopkins Marine Station and SF Maritime Historical Park.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Cohen, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 172E: The Literature of the Americas (AMSTUD 142, COMPLIT 142, CSRE 142)

A wide-ranging overview of the literatures of the Americas inncomparative perspective, emphasizing continuities and crises that are common to North American, Central American, and South American literatures as well as the distinctive national and cultural elements of a diverse array of primary works. Topics include the definitions of such concepts as empire and colonialism, the encounters between worldviews of European and indigenous peoples, the emergence of creole and racially mixed populations, slavery, the New World voice, myths of America as paradise or utopia, the coming of modernism, twentieth-century avant-gardes, and distinctive modern episodes--the Harlem Renaissance, the Beats, magic realism, Noigandres--in unaccustomed conversation with each other.
Last offered: Winter 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 184: The Novel (COMPLIT 123)

Literary inventiveness and social significance of novelistic forms from the Great Depression to the present.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 184H: Text Technologies: A History (STS 200D)

Beginning with cave painting, carving, cuneiform, hieroglyph, and other early textual innovations, survey of the history of writing, image, sound, and byte, all text technologies employed to create, communicate and commemorate. Focus on the recording of language, remembrance and ideas explicating significant themes seen throughout history; these include censorship, propaganda, authenticity, apocalypticism, technophobia, reader response, democratization and authority. The production, transmission and reception of tablet technology, the scroll, the manuscript codex and handmade book, the machine-made book, newspapers and ephemera; and investigate the emergence of the phonograph and photograph, film, radio, television and digital multimedia.The impact of these various text technologies on their users, and try to draw out similarities and differences in our cultural and intellectual responses to evolving technologies. STS majors must have senior status to enroll in this senior capstone course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Treharne, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 191: Intermediate Creative Nonfiction

Continuation of 91. Workshop. The application of advanced storytelling techniques to fact-based personal narratives, emphasizing organic writing, discovering audience, and publication. Guest lecturers, collaborative writing, and publication of the final project in print, audio, or web formats. Prerequisite: 91 or 90.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Kletter, D. (PI)

ENGLISH 192T: Topics in Intermediate Poetry Writing

Generation and discussion of student poems. How to recognize a poem's internal structure; how to seek models for work. Students submit portfolio for group critique. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENGLISH 92.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 195B: How to Write a Great Essay: A Writing Bootcamp for Undergraduates

Practical workshop for undergraduates on how to improve essay-writing skills. Focus on the finer points of vocabulary, grammar, mechanics, logic, timing, intellectual precision; how to connect with (and delight) an audience; how to magnify a theme; how to deflect counter-arguments; how to develop your own sophisticated authorial 'style'; how to write sentences (and papers!) your reader will care about and admire and maybe even remember. The course has been designed with humanities students and especially English majors in mind, but any student who hopes to improve his or her writing should be able to benefit from the practical instruction on offer. The course enrollment will be limited to 12 students and the class run as a workshop. The reading component will be comparatively light. Over the course of the quarter we will read two novels--J.M. Coetzee's novel Disgrace and Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita--modern fictional masterpieces both, and students will be writing blog notes and short papers for each book.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Castle, T. (PI)

ENGLISH 196A: Honors Seminar: Critical Approaches to Literature

Overview of literary-critical methodologies, with a practical emphasis shaped by participants' current honors projects. Restricted to students in the English Honors Program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Staveley, A. (PI)
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