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261 - 270 of 766 results for: all courses

ENGLISH 91Q: Twitter Fiction/Future Forms

Digital media--from Twitter to the Kindle--are roiling the literary marketplace. But could these new forms and content delivery methods also create new opportunities for creative work? Twitter is a hotbed of adopted personae and clearly false characters; sites from FiveChapters to Plympton are reviving the serial form; new apps feature inventive short fiction. Additionally, established writers, from Margaret Atwood to Jennifer Egan, are harnessing the forms offered by digital media to spur their own artistic invention. In this unsettled landscape, what does it even mean to write fiction? What does it mean to create stories without the assumption of the reader's undivided attention? And what do lessons from our literary history--from Gutenberg to the serial novels of the Victorian age--have to teach us about our current historical moment? These and many more questions will be our subject as we read the exciting work being done in this new world--and then become pioneers ourselves, by writing, workshopping, and publishing our own Twitter fiction and future forms.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Hutchins, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 92: Reading and Writing Poetry

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Issues of poetic craft. How elements of form, music, structure, and content work together to create meaning and experience in a poem. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 94: Creative Writing Across Genres

For minors in creative writing. The forms and conventions of the contemporary short story and poem. How form, technique, and content combine to make stories and poems organic. Prerequisite: 90, 91, or 92.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Pufahl, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 105H: Medievalism

Course examines the ¿medievalism¿ of nineteenth-century British writers, that is, their adoption of medieval subjects and themes, within the context of medieval literature. Our leading questions cluster around three topics: the quest, Arthurian romance, and the dark side of fairyland. Readings include Marie de France¿s Lais, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Malory¿s Morte D¿Arthure, Spenser¿s Faerie Queene, Scott¿s Ivanhoe, Stoker¿s Dracula, poems by Morris, R. Browning, and Tennyson, and selections from Tennyson¿s Idylls of the Kings. Requirements include two papers and three short exams.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 106E: Dante and Aristotle (PHIL 193D)

Students will read all of Dante¿s Commedia alongside works by Aristotle and various ancient and medieval philosophers. Our aim will be to understand the way an Aristotelian worldview informs the Commedia. For instance, what is the role of pleasure in the ethical life? What is the highest good of the human being? All readings will be in translation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

ENGLISH 113A: Desire, Identity, Modernity

While drawing on classic work in modern queer studies, the course will focus on the role which Renaissance discourses of desire continue to play in our negotiations of homo/erotic subjectivity, identity politics, and sexual and gender difference. We will study Renaissance queerness in relation to the classical tradition on the one hand and the contemporary discourses of religion, medicine, law, and politics on the other. nReadings include diverse genres, from plays and poems to essays, dialogues, letters, etc. Both major and minor authors will be represented"
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Lupic, I. (PI)

ENGLISH 115C: Hamlet and the Critics (TAPS 151C)

Focus is on Shakespeare's Hamletas a site of rich critical controversy from the eighteenth century to the present. Aim is to read, discuss, and evaluate different approaches to the play, from biographical, theatrical, and psychological to formalist, materialist, feminist, new historicist, and, most recently, quantitative. The ambition is to see whether there can be great literature without (a) great (deal of) criticism. The challenge is to understand the theory of literature through the study of its criticism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Lupic, I. (PI)

ENGLISH 124: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ARTHIST 152, HISTORY 151, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ENGLISH 139B: American Women Writers, 1850-1920 (AMSTUD 139B, FEMGEN 139B)

The ways in which female writers negotiated a series of literary, social, and intellectual movements, from abolitionism and sentimentalism in the nineteenth century to Progressivism and avant-garde modernism in the twentieth. Authors include Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Jacobs, Rebecca Harding Davis, Emily Dickinson, Kate Chopin, Edith Wharton, Gertrude Stein, Willa Cather, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 143A: American Indian Mythology, Legend, and Lore (ENGLISH 43A, NATIVEAM 143A)

(English majors and others taking 5 units, register for 143A.) Readings from American Indian literatures, old and new. Stories, songs, and rituals from the 19th century, including the Navajo Night Chant. Tricksters and trickster stories; war, healing, and hunting songs; Aztec songs from the 16th century. Readings from modern poets and novelists including N. Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, and Leslie Marmon Silko, and the classic autobiography, "Black Elk Speaks."
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
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