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HUMBIO 167: The Art of Vision

This course concerns eyes and art. It asks how eyes are built, how they process visual information, and how they are affected by diseases that are major problems in our society. These topics are illustrated through fine art and famous artists, and we explore the implications of both normal and abnormal vision for art. There are short diversions into animal eyes and the role of vision in music, literature, and sports.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Marmor, M. (PI)

HUMBIO 175H: Literature and Human Experimentation (AFRICAAM 223, COMPLIT 223, CSRE 123B, MED 220)

This course introduces students to the ways literature has been used to think through the ethics of human subjects research and experimental medicine. We will focus primarily on readings that imaginatively revisit experiments conducted on vulnerable populations: namely groups placed at risk by their classification according to perceived human and cultural differences. We will begin with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), and continue our study via later works of fiction, drama and literary journalism, including Toni Morrison's Beloved, David Feldshuh's Miss Evers Boys, Hannah Arendt's Eichmann and Vivien Spitz's Doctors from Hell, Rebecca Skloot's Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go. Each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical and policy writings of the period; and our ultimate goal will be to understand modes of ethics deliberation that are possible via creative uses of the imagination, and literature's place in a history of ethical thinking about humane research and care.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ikoku, A. (PI)

HUMBIO 175L: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, CSRE 129B, FRENCH 229, MED 234)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ikoku, A. (PI)

ILAC 103N: The Millenium Novel in Latin America

Between 2000 and 2012, a young Spanish American novel emerges, taking at times a minimalist point of view to narrate individual stories with a subjective tone, or continuing a tradition of the historical panorama to present national tragedies that occurred in the last two or three decades. Focus is on this new type of novel from different countries, with such titles as "El cuerpo en que nací" by Guadalupe Entel; "Las teorías salvajes" by Pola Oloixarac; "El ruido de las cosas al caer" by Juan Gabriel Vazquez; and "Bonsai" by Alejandro Zambra, among others. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 107N: 3D Modeling, Virtual Media, and the Poetics of the Self: The Art and Lives of Fernando Pessoa

Preference to freshmen. The poetry and prose of Fernando Pessoa, Portugal'€™s greatest modern poet. As famous for his written work (in Portuguese and English) as for his complex understanding of selfhood (he would divide his own subjectivity into 106 different, autonomous selves), Pessoa remains a towering and largely perplexing figure even today. Class discussions will focus on close readings of Pessoa'€™s work along with the implications of his theory of subjectivity for our understanding of modernity, art, and the self. Class field trip to San Francisco. Written assignments include a journal, blog posts, and a final paper written as someone else. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 108N: Masterpieces: García Márquez

Extensive and detailed reading of the major works and a selection of the most significant critical texts about the author. Secondary readings by Vargas Llosa, Ludmer, Moretti, and Bloom. Topics include: macondismo, magical realism, canonicity, representations of violence, and autobiography.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 111Q: Spanish-English Literary Translation Workshop (DLCL 111Q)

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practicalnskills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English andnEnglish to Spanish. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies,nand semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translationnin the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological andnsocio-cultural forces that shape translations. Students will workshop andnrevise an original translation project throughout the quarter.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ILAC 113Q: Borges and Translation (DLCL 113Q)

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 114N: Introduction to Lyric Poetry

A basic introduction to the elements of lyric poetry--image, metaphor, symbol, connotation, denotation, irony, rhyme and meter - drawing upon a selection of poems from major poets of the Hispanic World, including, G. A. Bécquer, Rosalía de Castro, Rubén Darío, Miguel de Unamuno, Antonio Machado, Juan Ramón Jiménez, Garcia Lorca, Pablo Neruda, and Gabriela Mistral. This is a bilingual course, taught both in English, and Spanish, with an emphasis on Spanish.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 116: Approaches to Spanish and Spanish American Literature

Short stories, poetry, and theater. What analytical tools do the "grammars" of different genres call for? What contact zones exist between these genres? How have ideologies, the power of patronage, and shifting poetics shaped their production over time? Authors may include Arrabal, Borges, Cortázar, Cernuda,García Márquez, Lorca, Neruda, Rivas. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SpanLang 13C
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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