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411 - 420 of 766 results for: all courses

HISTORY 6S: Wealth, Empire, and the Making of the Modern Economy, 1800 to Present

What is the history behind our modern economy? What counts as national wealth, and who decides? More than a measure of GDP, the modern economy is the product of some of history's most divisive social, political, and cultural struggles. This seminar surveys two hundred years of European and often global history in order to explore the historical relationships among wealth, empire, the nation-state and statistics, Big Data, and the modern economy. As an introduction to the methods of historical analysis and historical perspective, this seminar focuses on the use of primary sources. Sources include the writings of crucial thinkers from Adam Smith to Karl Polanyi; novels and literature from the 19th century; press materials and political speeches; historical maps; private letters; art and architecture; as well as digital sources such as radio and film. Students from all majors are encouraged to enroll. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Aut, offered once only | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hein, B. (PI)

HISTORY 30N: Eighteen-Year-Olds Go to War: Global Experiences of World War I

Exactly one hundred years ago, eighteen-year-olds like you went to war, imagining a romantic, life-changing experience. They found instead an apocalyptic nightmare, senseless mass death, unending stalemate, mud, rats, and endless trauma. In this course we will revisit the journeys of young men and women who lived through the First World War in Europe, India, the Middle East, and Africa. We will explore the causes, unfolding, legacy, and memory of the war, using diaries, letters, memoirs, novels, poetry, films, and works of historical analysis. Witness the birth of the modern world.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 34S: Newspapers, Salons and Coffeehouses: The Rise of the Public in Early Modern Europe

Between Twitter and the NSA, it seems that every aspect of our lives can, voluntarily or involuntarily, be made public with a tap on a screen. But what exactly is the public and where did it come from? In this course, we will explore the rise of the public in 17th and 18th century Europe, through paintings, engravings, newspapers, memoirs, poetry, plays, political cartoons and song. At stake was-- and still is-- the very nature of sovereignty, power, and knowledge. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Barnet, E. (PI)

HISTORY 40A: The Scientific Revolution

(Same as History 140A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for History 140A.) What do people know and how do they know it? What counts as scientific knowledge? In the 16th and 17th centuries, understanding the nature of knowledge engaged the attention of individuals and institutions including Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, the early Royal Society, and less well-known contemporaries. New meanings of observing, collecting, experimenting, and philosophizing, and political, religious, and cultural ramifications in early modern Europe.
Terms: Aut, last offered Autumn 2015 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 48: The Egyptians (AFRICAAM 30, CLASSICS 82, HISTORY 148)

Overview of ancient Egyptian pasts, from predynastic times to Greco-Roman rule, roughly 3000 BCE to 30 BCE. Attention to archaeological sites and artifacts; workings of society; and cultural productions, both artistic and literary. Participation in class is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Austin, A. (PI)

HISTORY 50A: Colonial and Revolutionary America

(Same as HISTORY 150A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150A.) Survey of the origins of American society and polity in the 17th and 18th centuries. Topics: the migration of Europeans and Africans and the impact on native populations; the emergence of racial slavery and of regional, provincial, Protestant cultures; and the political origins and constitutional consequences of the American Revolution.
Terms: Aut, last offered Autumn 2015 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Gienapp, J. (PI)

HISTORY 54N: African American Women's Lives (AFRICAAM 54N, AMSTUD 54N, CSRE 54N, FEMGEN 54N)

Preference to freshmen. We will examine the struggles of African American women to define their own lives and improve the social, economic, political and cultural conditions of black communities. Topics will include women's enslavement and freedom, kinship and family relations, institution and community building, violence, labor and leisure, changing gender roles, consumer and beauty culture, social activism, and the politics of sexuality.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hobbs, A. (PI)

HISTORY 63N: The Feminist Critique: The History and Politics of Gender Equality (AMSTUD 63N, CSRE 63N, FEMGEN 63N)

This course explores the emergence of concepts of gender equality in world history. It asks how gender inequality relates to racial, ethnicity, and sexual identities, how men engage with feminism, whether gender equality is purely a western cultural tradition, and much more. We approach the long history of ideas about gender and equality by reading primary historical documents from around the world, moving from the 15th century to the present. Topics include education, the body, sexuality, violence, labor, and politics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

HISTORY 65D: The Pacific World

(Same as HISTORY 165D. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 165D.) Taking the Pacific and the regions of the world that touch the ocean as the unit of analysis, we will explore geographic, social, cultural, and political interactions that created what we now call the Pacific World. Ranging over four hundred years of history, we will examine human migrations, explorations, interactions and conflicts, and human ecology. The course is not nation-focused but is transnational and international in approach.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Chang, G. (PI)

HISTORY 78N: Film and History of Latin American Revolutions and Counterrevolutions

In this course we will watch and critique films made about Latin America's 20th century revolutions focusing on the Mexican, Cuban, Chilean and Nicaraguan revolutions. We will analyze the films as both social and political commentaries and as aesthetic and cultural works, alongside archivally-based histories of these revolutions.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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