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131 - 140 of 658 results for: all courses

COMM 162: Campaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections (COMM 262, POLISCI 120B)

This course examines the theory and practice of American campaigns and elections. First, we will attempt to explain the behavior of the key players -- candidates, parties, journalists, and voters -- in terms of the institutional arrangements and political incentives that confront them. Second, we will use current and recent election campaigns as "laboratories" for testing generalizations about campaign strategy and voter behavior. Third, we examine selections from the academic literature dealing with the origins of partisan identity, electoral design, and the immediate effects of campaigns on public opinion, voter turnout, and voter choice. As well, we'll explore issues of electoral reform and their more long-term consequences for governance and the political process.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Iyengar, S. (PI)

COMM 164: The Psychology of Communication About Politics in America (COMM 264, POLISCI 224L, PSYCH 170)

Focus is on how politicians and government learn what Americans want and how the public's preferences shape government action; how surveys measure beliefs, preferences, and experiences; how poll results are criticized and interpreted; how conflict between polls is viewed by the public; how accurate surveys are and when they are accurate; how to conduct survey research to produce accurate measurements; designing questionnaires that people can understand and use comfortably; how question wording can manipulate poll results; corruption in survey research.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI

COMM 166: Virtual People (COMM 266)

(Graduate students register for COMM 266.) The concept of virtual people or digital human representations; methods of constructing and using virtual people; methodological approaches to interactions with and among virtual people; and current applications. Viewpoints including popular culture, literature, film, engineering, behavioral science, computer science, and communication.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI

COMM 168: Experimental Research in Advanced User Interfaces (COMM 268, COMM 368, ME 468)

Project-based course involves small (3-4) person teams going through all parts of the experimental process: question generation, experiment design, running, and data analysis. Each team creates an original, publishable project that represents a contribution to the research and practicum literatures. All experiments involve interaction between people and technology, including cars, mobile phones, websites, etc. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit

COMM 169: Computers and Interfaces (COMM 269)

(Graduate students register for COMM 269.) Interdisciplinary. Interdisciplinary. User responses to interfaces and design implications of those responses. Theories from different disciplines illustrate cognitive, emotional, and social responses to textual, voice-based, pictorial, metaphoric, conversational, adaptive, agent-based, intelligent, and anthropomorphic interfaces. Group design project applying theory to the design of an interactive interface.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-SI

COMM 172: Media Psychology (COMM 272)

(Graduate students register for COMM 272.) The literature related to psychological processing and the effects of media. Topics: unconscious processing; picture perception; attention and memory; emotion; the physiology of processing media; person perception; pornography; consumer behavior; advanced film and television systems; and differences among reading, watching, and listening.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

COMM 182: Social Media Issues (COMM 282)

(Graduate students register for COMM 282.) Students will take away from this course a set of conceptual tools, a vocabulary, and an analytical framework with which to recognize, understand, and more effectively manage new social practices online, together with a familiarity with the literature regarding social media and identity, community, collective action, public sphere, social capital, networks, and social networks. Students will also develop skills at using online forums, blogs, microblogs, wikis for research, collaboration, and communication. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: instructor consent. Please see http://comm.stanford.edu/faculty-rheingold/ for application instructions. Contact instructor at: howard@rheingold.com
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI

COMM 183: Social Media Literacies (COMM 283)

Today's personal, social, political, economic worlds are all affected by digital media and networked publics: viral videos, uprisings from Tahrir to #OWS, free search engines, abundant inaccuracy and sophisticated disinformation online, indelible, and searchable digital footprints, laptops in lecture halls and BlackBerries at the dinner table, 20-something social media billionaires, massive online university courses. Introduction to the literature about and direct experience of these new literacies: research foundations and practical methods to control attention, attitudes and tools necessary for critical consumption of information, best practices of individual digital participation and collective participatory culture, the use of collaborative media and methodologies, and the application of network know-how to life online. Contrasting perspectives through readings and classroom and online discussion. Students collaborate and cooperate in their learning during and between classes through small group discussions and face to face exercises, forums, blogs, mindmaps and wikis. Prerequisite: instructor consent. See http://comm.stanford.edu/faculty-rheingold/ for application instructions; contact instructor at howard@rheingold.com.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI

COMPLIT 132A: Dynasties, Dictators and Democrats: History and Politics in Germany (GERMAN 132)

Key moments in German history through documents: personal accounts, political speeches and texts, and literary works. The course begins with the Prussian monarchy and proceeds to the crisis years of the French Revolution. Documents from the 1848 revolution and the age of Bismarck and German unification follow. World War I and its impact on Germany, including the rise of Hitler, as well as the aftermath, divided Germany in the Cold War through the fall of the Berlin Wall. Taught in German.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Berman, R. (PI)

COMPLIT 146: Asian American Culture and Community (AMSTUD 146, ASNAMST 146S, CSRE 146S)

This course introduces students to the histories of Asians in America, specifically as these histories are part of a broader Asia-US-Pacific history that characterized the 20th century and now the 21st. We will combine readings in history, literature, sociology, with community-based learning.nnThe course takes place over two quarters. The first quarter focuses on gaining knowledge of Asian America and discussion key topics that students wish to focus on collaboratively. During this first quarter we also learn about community-based learning, set up teams and projects, and develop relationships with community organizations. The second quarter students work with student liaisons (senior students who have experience in service learning) and complete their work with the community¿there are no formal class meetings this second quarter. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Course can be repeated once.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit
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