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271 - 280 of 658 results for: all courses

HISTORY 50C: The United States in the Twentieth Century

(Same as HISTORY 150C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150C.) Major political, economic, social, and diplomatic developments in the U.S. Themes: the economic and social role of government (Progressive, New Deal, Great Society, and Reagan-Bush eras); ethnic and racial minorities in society (mass immigration at the turn of the century and since 1965, the civil rights era of the 50s and 60s); the changing status of women since WW II; shifting ideological bases, institutional structures, and electoral characteristics of the political system (New Deal and post-Vietnam); determinants of foreign policy in WW I and II, and the Cold War.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 50N: Who Killed Jane Stanford?

In 1905 Jane Stanford died of strychnine poisoning. Who may have killed her remains unknown. You will, in effect, be a grand jury. Like most of your real life intellectual work, the class will be collaborative. Together you will identify suspects and examine the often odd actions of central figures in the case: her personal secretary, physicians, and David Starr Jordan, the president of Stanford.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: White, R. (PI)

HISTORY 54: American Intellectual and Cultural History to the Civil War

(Same as HISTORY 154. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 154.) How Americans considered problems such as slavery, imperialism, and sectionalism. Topics include: the political legacies of revolution; biological ideas of race; the Second Great Awakening; science before Darwin; reform movements and utopianism; the rise of abolitionism and proslavery thought; phrenology and theories of human sexuality; and varieties of feminism. Sources include texts and images.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: duRivage, J. (PI)

HISTORY 55Q: The Origins of the Modern American City, 1865-1920 (AMSTUD 25Q, URBANST 25Q)

Are we living in a new Gilded Age? To answer this question, we go back to the original Gilded Age, as well as its successor, the Progressive Era. How did urban Americans around the turn of the twentieth century deal with stark inequalities of class, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality? And what can we learn from their struggles for our own time? Students use primary and secondary sources in digital and print formats. Possible field trip to San Francisco.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kahan, M. (PI)

HISTORY 60N: Revolutionaries and Founders

Americans remain fascinated by the revolutionary generation which secured independence and established a national constitutional republic. Books about the founders come steadily from the presses, some describing the lives of individual revolutionaries, others trying to analyze and explain what made these events possible. This seminar will approach the Revolution through both a biographical and analytical framework, relying both on scholarly writings and the massive array of primary sources that are readily available through letterpress editions and on-line. The course will rely on the instructor's own recent book, Revolutionaries: A New History of the Invention of America, which carries the story from the crisis around the Boston Tea Party of 1773 through the end of President Washington's first administration. The course will be divided evenly between modern scholarship and the careful reading of original materials, and students will write short essays that will involve the analysis of explanatory problems, the close interpretation of documents, and the crafting of historical narratives. Topics to be discussed will include the outbreak of the revolution, constitution-making at both the state and national levels of government, the conduct of the war, and the legacies that Americans particularly associate with Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and Alexander Hamilton.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 63N: The Feminist Critique: The History and Politics of Gender Equality (AMSTUD 63N, CSRE 63N, FEMGEN 63N)

This course explores the emergence of concepts of gender equality in world history. It asks how gender inequality relates to racial, ethnicity, and sexual identities, how men engage with feminism, whether gender equality is purely a western cultural tradition, and much more. We approach the long history of ideas about gender and equality by reading primary historical documents from around the world, moving from the 15th century to the present. Topics include education, the body, sexuality, violence, labor, and politics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

HISTORY 64: Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America (CSRE 64)

How ethnicity influenced the American experience and how prevailing attitudes about racial and ethnic groups over time have affected the historical and contemporary reality of the nation's major minority populations. Focus is on the past two centuries.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 65D: The Pacific World

(Same as HISTORY 165D. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 165D.) Taking the Pacific and the regions of the world that touch the ocean as the unit of analysis, we will explore geographic, social, cultural, and political interactions that created what we now call the Pacific World. Ranging over four hundred years of history, we will examine human migrations, explorations, interactions and conflicts, and human ecology. The course is not nation-focused but is transnational and international in approach.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Chang, G. (PI)

HISTORY 66S: The Americans are Coming!: The Cold War at Home and Abroad (CSRE 66S)

This course explores the relationship between U.S. foreign and domestic policy from 1945 to 1975. How did fighting the "Communist menace" shape notions of race, gender, and national identity within the United States? In what ways did nation-building abroad trigger clashes over the meaning of democracy at home? Using textual sources, photographs, films, and cartoons, students will examine notions of what it meant to be "American," both inside and outside the nation's borders, in a Cold War climate. The course fulfills the departmental Sources and Methods requirement.
Terms: Win, offered once only | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Katzen, R. (PI)

HISTORY 70: Culture, Politics, and Society in Latin America

(Same as HISTORY 170B. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in HISTORY 170B.) The course of Latin American history from the colonial era to the present day. Key issues such as colonialism, nationalism, democracy, and revolution will be examined critically in light of broad comparative themes in Latin American and world history. Sources include writings in the social sciences as well as primary documents, fiction, and film.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Iber, P. (PI)
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