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141 - 150 of 658 results for: all courses

COMPLIT 190: Tolstoy's Anna Karenina in Dialogue with Contemporary Philosophical, Social, and Ethical Thought (COMPLIT 390, SLAVIC 190, SLAVIC 390)

Anna Karenina, the novel as a case study in the contest between "modernity" and "tradition," their ethical order, ideology, cultural codes, and philosophies. Images of society, women and men in Tolstoy v. those of his contemporaries: Marx, Mill, Nietzsche, Weber, Durkheim, Freud. Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. Requirements: three interpretive essays (500-1000 words each). Analysis of a passage from the novel; AK refracted through a "philosophical" prism and vice versa (30% each); class discussion and Forum (10%).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 14N: Growing Up Bilingual (CHILATST 14N, EDUC 114N)

This course is a Freshman Introductory Seminar that has as its purpose introducing students to the sociolinguistic study of bilingualism by focusing on bilingual communities in this country and on bilingual individuals who use two languages in their everyday lives. Much attention is given to the history, significance, and consequences of language contact in the United States. The course focuses on the experiences of long-term US minority populations as well as that of recent immigrants.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Valdes, G. (PI)

CSRE 41A: Genes and Identity (AFRICAAM 41, ANTHRO 41)

In recent decades genes have increasingly become endowed with the cultural power to explain many aspects of human life: physical traits, diseases, behaviors, ancestral histories, and identity. In this course we will explore a deepening societal intrigue with genetic accounts of personal identity and political meaning. Students will engage with varied interdisciplinary sources that range from legal cases to scientific articles, medical ethics guidelines, films, and anthropological works (ethnographies). We will explore several case studies where the use of DNA markers (as proof of heritage, disease risk, or legal standing) has spawned cultural movements that are biosocial in nature. Throughout we will look at how new social movements are organized around gene-based definitions of personhood, health, and legal truth. Several examples include political analyses of citizenship and belonging. On this count we will discuss issues of African ancestry testing as evidence in slavery reparations cases, revisit debates on whether Black Freedman should be allowed into the Cherokee and Seminole Nations, and hear arguments on whether people with genetic links to Jewish groups should have a right of return to Israel. We will also examine the ways genetic knowledge may shape different health politics at the individual and societal level. On this count we will do close readings of how personal genomics testing companies operate, we will investigate how health disparities funding as well as orphan disease research take on new valences when re-framed in genetic terms, and we will see how new articulations of global health priorities are emerging through genetic research in places like Africa. Finally we will explore social implications of forensic uses of DNA. Here we will examine civil liberties concerns about genetic familial searching in forensic databases that disproportionately target specific minority groups as criminal suspects, and inquire into the use of DNA to generate digital mugshots of suspects that re-introduce genetic concepts of race.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 45Q: Understanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society (SOC 45Q)

Preference to sophomores. Historical overview of race in America, race and violence, race and socioeconomic well-being, and the future of race relations in America. Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

CSRE 63N: The Feminist Critique: The History and Politics of Gender Equality (AMSTUD 63N, FEMGEN 63N, HISTORY 63N)

This course explores the emergence of concepts of gender equality in world history. It asks how gender inequality relates to racial, ethnicity, and sexual identities, how men engage with feminism, whether gender equality is purely a western cultural tradition, and much more. We approach the long history of ideas about gender and equality by reading primary historical documents from around the world, moving from the 15th century to the present. Topics include education, the body, sexuality, violence, labor, and politics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

CSRE 64: Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America (HISTORY 64)

How ethnicity influenced the American experience and how prevailing attitudes about racial and ethnic groups over time have affected the historical and contemporary reality of the nation's major minority populations. Focus is on the past two centuries.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 66S: The Americans are Coming!: The Cold War at Home and Abroad (HISTORY 66S)

This course explores the relationship between U.S. foreign and domestic policy from 1945 to 1975. How did fighting the "Communist menace" shape notions of race, gender, and national identity within the United States? In what ways did nation-building abroad trigger clashes over the meaning of democracy at home? Using textual sources, photographs, films, and cartoons, students will examine notions of what it meant to be "American," both inside and outside the nation's borders, in a Cold War climate. The course fulfills the departmental Sources and Methods requirement.
Terms: Win, offered once only | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Katzen, R. (PI)

CSRE 84: Zionism (HISTORY 84, JEWISHST 84, REES 84)

(Same as HISTORY 184. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 184.) Hotly contested still, this course will open up the movement's ideas, practices, achievements and crises in such a way as to allow students to hear the fullest range of voices - Jewish, Arab, religious, secular, etc. It will track the movement from its appearance in the late nineteenth century until the establishment of State of Israel in 1948, and beyond.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 108: Introduction to Feminist Studies (AMSTUD 107, FEMGEN 101, TAPS 108)

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Brody, J. (PI)

CSRE 121L: Racial-Ethnic Politics in US (AMSTUD 121L, POLISCI 121L, PUBLPOL 121L)

This course examines various issues surrounding the role of race and ethnicity in the American political system. Specifically, this course will evaluate the development of racial group solidarity and the influence of race on public opinion, political behavior, the media, and in the criminal justice system. We will also examine the politics surrounding the Multiracial Movement and the development of racial identity and political attitudes in the 21st century. Stats 60 or Econ 1 is strongly recommended.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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