2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

351 - 360 of 658 results for: all courses

HISTORY 221A: Men, Women, and Power in Early Modern Russia, 1500-1800

Social values, gender relations, and social change in an era of rapid change; challenges to established norms by new constructions of deviance (witchcraft, religious reform, and revolt) and new standards of civility; encounters with non-Russians and the construction of national consciousness. Social values as political ethos: patrimonial autocracy and the reality of female rule in the late 17th and 18th century.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-SI

HISTORY 222: Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Europe and Russia

Explores criminal law in early modern Europe and Russia, ca 1500-1800, in law and in practice. Engages debates about use of exemplary public executions as tactic of governance, and about gradual decline in "violence" in Europe over this time. Explores practice of accusatory and inquisitory judicial procedures, judicial torture, forms of punishment, concepts of justice.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 224C: Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention (HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 284C, JEWISHST 384C, PEDS 224)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 230F: Surveillance in Modern Europe (HISTORY 330F)

We will investigate the role of surveillance in modern societies -- the motives, pressures, and consequences of informal and formal systems of control from the French Revolution to the present day. Students will encounter a variety of sources and situations, analyzing the tensions between social stability and individual pursuits, and the circumstances under which these tensions can lead to state repression and violence.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Sheffer, E. (PI)

HISTORY 231E: Paper, Printing, and Digital Revolutions: Transformations of the Book (HISTORY 331E)

What is a book? This seminar explores the conceptual implications of approximately two millennia of transformations in the physical and material properties of books. How have the meaning and authority we assign the written word changed as technologies of book production and dissemination have evolved, and how have they remained continuous? Topics covered include the rise of the medieval manuscript codex, the emergence of print culture in early modern Europe, and current debates over the nature of text in the digital age.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Clark, F. (PI)

HISTORY 233C: Two British Revolutions (HISTORY 333C)

Current scholarship on Britain,1640-1700, focusing on political and religious history. Topics include: causes and consequences of the English civil war and revolution; rise and fall of revolutionary Puritanism; the Restoration; popular politics in the late 17th century; changing contours of religious life; the crisis leading to the Glorious Revolution; and the new order that emerged after the deposing of James II.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI
Instructors: Como, D. (PI)

HISTORY 244: Egyptomania! The Allure of Ancient Egypt Over the Past 3,500 Years (CLASSICS 87)

Why does Egypt fascinate us? From Napoleon¿s invasion to Katy Perry¿s latest music video, we have interpreted ancient Egyptian history and mythology for centuries; in fact, this obsession dates back to the Egyptians themselves. This seminar explores Egyptomania from the Pharaonic period to the 20th century. Topics include: ancient Egypt, Greek historians, medieval Arabic scholars, hieroglyphic decipherment, 19th century travel, 20th century pop culture, and how historians have interpreted this past over the centuries.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Austin, A. (PI)

HISTORY 245: Violence and Identity in the African Great Lakes Region

Untangles current crises through exploring debates on migration, autochthony, ethnicity and nationalism from the pre-colonial era to the present. While the majority of the course focuses on the region's `center' (Rwanda, Burundi and the Democratic Republic of the Congo), we will also examine continuities and differences within the larger geographic region. Topics include the historical roots and perspectives that inform genocide, gender based violence, mineral exploitation, reconciliation, development and controversies around homosexuality in Uganda and the wider region.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 246E: Refugees and the Making of the Modern World: 1945-Present (HISTORY 346E)

Following the mass popular displacements of WWII, a group of diplomats came together to create the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees-- the bases of the international refugee regime that has endured to the present. We will explore the processes that led to the creation of the modern international refugee regime, and how international refugee law has evolved in response to conflicts and emergencies "on the ground." Throughout, we will question the category of the "refugee," and interrogate the methods by which refugees, as individuals and as groups, have sought to control and alter their positions under national and international authorities. Topics will include notions of migration and asylum, the creation and evolution of international refugee law, refugees, stateless people, economic migrants, and decolonization. We will have case studies of post-WWII European, Palestinian, Thai, Ethiopian, Haitian, and Cuban "refugees," among others.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 247: Violence in African History: Conflict and Healing in sub-Saharan Africa (HISTORY 347)

This course questions what constitutes "violence" in African history, and why it occurred when it did. We will examine the subtleties of "violence" in African history, which have sometimes led to conflicts, and sometimes to rich strategies of healing and improvisation. These include ecological crises, domestic violence, corruption, economic exploitation, and demographic crises (including urbanization and diseases such as HIV-AIDS). While we begin by examining ideas about conflict in pre-colonial Africa, the course focuses on the colonial and post-colonial eras in African history.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints