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281 - 290 of 865 results for: all courses

ENGLISH 111B: Medieval Romance

Romance emerges as a distinct genre in the Middle Ages, defined not just by love stories but by quests and battles and otherworldly creatures. Study of its origins and development, focusing on Middle English texts. About half of the class will be devoted to Chaucer, including some of the "Canterbury Tales" and "Troilus and Criseyde". Readings include some Arthurian literature: "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight", as well as popular romances such as "Sir Orfeo" and "Floris and Blancheflour". No knowledge of Middle English or medieval literature is expected.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Karnes, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 118: Literature and the Brain (ENGLISH 218, FRENCH 118, FRENCH 318, PSYCH 118F)

Recent developments in and neuroscience and experimental psychology have transformed the way we think about the operations of the brain. What can we learn from this about the nature and function of literary texts? Can innovative ways of speaking affect ways of thinking? Do creative metaphors draw on embodied cognition? Can fictions strengthen our "theory of mind" capabilities? What role does mental imagery play in the appreciation of descriptions? Does (weak) modularity help explain the mechanism and purpose of self-reflexivity? Can the distinctions among types of memory shed light on what narrative works have to offer?
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 122A: Austen and Woolf

Reading of three novels by Jane Austen¿arguably the most influential and gifted of British female novelists-¿and three novels by Virginia Woolf, whose debt to Austen was immense. Topics include the relationship between women writers and the evolution of the English novel; the extraordinary predominance of the marriage plot in Austen¿s fiction (and the various transformations Woolf works on it); each novelist¿s relationship to the cultural and social milieu in which she wrote.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 150: Poetry and the Internet

How has contemporary poetry been transformed by the Internet and other new media. How have poets responded to the new media forms, from Facebook to Twitter, that now absorb the attention of so many people? How have poets utilized the torrents of information accessible to them with a few keystrokes? Focus will mostly be on poetry written after 2000; secondary readings will draw from literary criticism, media theory, and sociology.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Bernes, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 154J: Prep Schools, Frat Houses, and Hogwarts: The Campus in 20th & 21st Century Literature

This course examines the representation of campus life across a variety of media and genres: from Willa Cather¿s The Professor¿s House (1925) to Todd Phillips¿s Old School (2003) to Vampire Weekend¿s ¿Campus¿ (2008) and beyond. By studying the evolution of the campus over the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, we will explore how artists dealt with the school as an increasingly unavoidable part of modern experience. Why do artists rebel so vehemently against the school system? Why do schools like teaching novels that are all about how terrible schools are? What can and can¿t we learn in class?
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Frank, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 183F: Introduction to Critical Theory

An introduction to critical theory, beginning with some of the defining moments of its history in the 20th century, to current developments in the field in the context of the contemporary global skepticism of humanistic critique, both in its institutional capacity and within the larger public sphere. Texts by Louis Althusser, Michel Foucault, Helene Cixous, Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri, Edward Said, David Lodge and others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Majumdar, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 201: The Bible and Literature

Differences in translations of the Bible into English. Recognizing and interpreting biblical allusion in texts from the medieval to modern periods. Readings from the Bible and from British, Canadian, American, and African American, and African literature in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Parker, P. (PI)

ENGR 131: Ethical Issues in Engineering

Moral rights and responsibilities of engineers in relation to society, employers, colleagues, and clients; cost-benefit-risk analysis, safety, and informed consent; the ethics of whistle blowing; ethical conflicts of engineers as expert witnesses, consultants, and managers; ethical issues in engineering design, manufacturing, and operations; ethical issues arising from engineering work in foreign countries; and ethical implications of the social and environmental contexts of contemporary engineering. Case studies, guest practitioners, and field research. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: McGinn, R. (PI)

ETHICSOC 20: Introduction to Moral Philosophy (PHIL 2)

A survey of moral philosophy in the Western tradition. What makes right actions right and wrong actions wrong? What is it to have a virtuous rather than a vicious character? What is the basis of these distinctions? Why should we care about morality at all? Our aim is to understand how some of the most influential philosophers (including Aristotle, Kant, and Mill) have addressed these questions, and by so doing, to better formulate our own views. No prior familiarity with philosophy required.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Schapiro, T. (PI)

ETHICSOC 136R: Introduction to Global Justice (INTNLREL 136R, PHIL 76, POLISCI 136R, POLISCI 336)

Recent work in political theory on global justice. Topics include global poverty, human rights, fair trade, immigration, climate change. Do developed countries have a duty to aid developing countries? Do rich countries have the right to close their borders to economic immigrants? When is humanitarian intervention justified? Readings include Charles Beitz, Thomas Pogge, John Rawls.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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