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51 - 60 of 865 results for: all courses

AMSTUD 186A: American Hauntings

Cultural, psychological, social, and political dynamics of haunting in American literature, from the early national period to the late 20th century. Sources include ghost stories and other instances of supernatural, emotional, or mental intervention. Authors include Charles Brockden Brown, Washington Irving, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Louisa May Alcott, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Charles Chesnutt, Henry James, Edith Wharton, Toni Morrison, and Stephen King.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AMSTUD 244: The Visual Culture of the American Home Front, 1941-1945 (ARTHIST 244)

How does home front of WWII look now? What sort of meanings appear with the vantage of more than sixty years' distance? Examining Hollywood films from those years -films made during the war but mostly not directly about the war - the seminar focuses on developing students' abilities to write emotion-based criticism and history. Weekly short papers, each one in response to a film screening, are required. Among the films screened: Shadow of a Doubt, Gaslight, I Walked with a Zombie, The Best Years of Our Lives.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 12: Anthropology and Art

Modernity. How the concept of art appears timeless and commonsensical in the West, and with what social consequences. Historicizing the emergence of art. Modernist uses of primitive, child art, asylum, and outsider art.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 162: Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Problems (ANTHRO 262)

The social and cultural consequences of contemporary environmental problems. The impact of market economies, development efforts, and conservation projects on indigenous peoples, emphasizing Latin America. The role of indigenous grass roots organizations in combating environmental destruction and degradation of homeland areas.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Durham, W. (PI)

ANTHRO 145B: Reinventing the Other: Greeks, Romans, Barbarians

Ancient ethnography was a highly conventionalized tradition stretching from "the father of History," Herodotus, to the last historian of the ancient world, Procopius. We will read selections of these two authors' works as well as of Sallust, Tacitus, and lesser known ones. Within various theoretical frameworks'rhetorical, anthropological, structuralist we will reconstruct the shifting images of The Other, explore what they tell us about their producers, and reflect on what ancient ethnography contributed to its modern descendant.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARCHLGY 42: Pompeii

(Formerly CLASSART 42 and CLASSGEN 60.) The Roman town of Pompeii, buried by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 C.E., provides information about the art and archaeology of ancient social life, urban technology and production, and ancient spatial patterns and experience. Its fame illustrates modern relationships to the ancient past, from Pompeii's importance on the Grand Tour, to plaster casts of vaporized bodies, to debates about reconstruction, preservation, and archaeological methods.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 81: Introduction to Roman Archaeology (CLASSICS 52)

(Formerly CLASSART 81.) This course will introduce you to the material culture of the ancient Roman world, from spectacular imperial monuments in the city of Rome to cities and roads around the Mediterranean, from overarching environmental concerns to individual human burials, from elite houses and army forts to the the lives of slaves, freedmen and gladiators. Key themes will be change and continuity over time; the material, spatial and visual workings of power; how Roman society was materially changed by its conquests and how conquered peoples responded materially to Roman rule.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 111: Emergence of Chinese Civilization from Caves to Palaces (CHINGEN 141, CHINGEN 241)

Introduces processes of cultural evolution from the Paleolithic to the Three Dynasties in China. By examining archaeological remains, ancient inscriptions, and traditional texts, four major topics will be discussed: origins of modern humans, beginnings of agriculture, development of social stratification, and emergence of states and urbanism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Liu, L. (PI)

ARCHLGY 118: Engineering the Roman Empire (CLASSICS 168)

(Formerly CLASSART 117.) Roman monuments and monumental space were designed to impress. This class explores the interrelated aesthetics and mechanics of construction that led to one of the most extensive building programs undertaken by a pre-modern state. Through case studies ranging from arches, columns and domes to road networks, machines and landscape modification, we investigate not only the materials, methods, and knowledge behind Roman architectural innovation, but the communication of imperial messages through designed space.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 143: Classical Archaeology Today: Ethical Issues of Excavation, Ownership, and Display

(Formerly CLASSART 143.) While Classical archaeology engages with material remains from the Greco-Roman past, it is embedded within and inseparable from contemporary practice. Through an examination of case studies, legal statutes, professional codes, and disciplinary practices, this seminar discusses ethical dilemmas raised by Classical archaeology in the 21st century. We will focus on broad issues ranging from ownership, looting, reconstruction, and collecting to nationalism, religion, tourism, and media, with an eye toward defining ethical ¿best practices¿ for Classical archaeology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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