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391 - 400 of 513 results for: all courses

MUSIC 187: Music and Culture from the Land of Fire: Introduction to Azerbaijani Mugham

Nestled in the Caucasus, Azerbaijan is a crossroads between East and West; its rich musical heritage contains threads of Turkish, Central Asian, Persian, Caucasian, Russian, and Arabic traditions. In this course, master-musician Imamyar Hasanov teaches students to perform and appreciate Azeri music. Content includes classical mugham, Eastern theory, improvisation and microtonality. We¿ll discuss Azeri music culture, supplemented by guest lecturers and Skype¿ interviews with musicians in Azerbaijan. Open to students with any experience playing a musical instrument (including voice). No previous experience with Azeri music necessary. Supported by the SF World Music Festival.Questions? Email schultza@stanford.edu.
| UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED
Instructors: Hasanov, I. (PI)

NATIVEAM 102: Indigenous Cultural Heritage: Protection, Practice, Repatriation (ANTHRO 102C, ARCHLGY 101, ARCHLGY 202, CSRE 102)

This interdisciplinary seminar explores challenges and avenues for furthering protection of the cultural heritage rights enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Using an innovative combination of online lectures by Stanford faculty and students, and recorded interviews with Indigenous leaders, artists, performers, scholars and museum professionals, the seminar will explore and problematize: historic and contemporary understandings of "Indigenous cultural heritage" and the impact of colonialism, urbanization and other forces on Indigenous identity and cultural heritage; current and potential domestic and international legal and non-legal frameworks for Indigenous cultural heritage protection and repatriation; past and present museum approaches to Indigenous peoples and their cultural material; and optimal methods of resolving repatriation disputes. While the seminar will cover primarily the situation of Indigenous peoples in North America, comparisons will be drawn with other regions of the globe. The on-campus component of the seminar will involve directed discussions of the online content, the online forum, assigned readings and short writing assignments. Students can choose between a final exam, paper or video project. Lunch is provided.
| UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Jessiman, S. (PI)

NATIVEAM 103S: Native American Women, Gender Roles, and Status (CSRE 103S, FEMGEN 103S)

Historical and cultural forces at work in traditional and contemporary Native American women's lives through life stories and literature. How women are fashioning gendered indigenous selves. Focus is on the diversity of Native American communities and cultures.
| UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED

NATIVEAM 115: Introduction to Native American History

This course surveys Native American history beginning with the forced removal of the Cherokee and other tribes from their eastern homelands to the geographic area of what is now the state of Oklahoma. This course will examine key issues including specific cases, i.e. the Marshall trilogy through a historic lens. The course material will cover Native American history to events leading up to the era of the civil rights movement in the twentieth century. The subject of sovereignty and self-determination will be discussed as part of the historic experience of Native Americans through assigned readings, short films, and other media.
| UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED

NATIVEAM 143A: American Indian Mythology, Legend, and Lore (ENGLISH 43A, ENGLISH 143A)

(English majors and others taking 5 units, register for 143A.) Readings from American Indian literatures, old and new. Stories, songs, and rituals from the 19th century, including the Navajo Night Chant. Tricksters and trickster stories; war, healing, and hunting songs; Aztec songs from the 16th century. Readings from modern poets and novelists including N. Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, and Leslie Marmon Silko, and the classic autobiography, "Black Elk Speaks."
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Fields, K. (PI)

OSPAUSTL 40: Australian Studies

Introduction to Australian society, history, culture, politics, and identity. Social and cultural framework and working understanding of Australia in relationship to the focus on coastal environment in other program courses. Field trips.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

OSPBEIJ 67: China-Africa and Middle East Relations

China¿s relations with the outside world, with a focus on Africa and the Middle East. Historically contextualized relations; evolution of relations within the international climate during different periods, especially in the present; impact of geopolitical and geoeconomic relations on the existing international order.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED

OSPBER 43: Culture Clashes: Race, Ethnicity and Migration in Germany and the U.S.

This course interrogates cultural products from Germany and the U.S. (novels, graphic narratives, tv and film, advertising images) to explore the cultural imaginaries through which people understand themselves, their compatriots, and the incoming migrants to the geopolitical regions in which they live. In asking what it might take to create racial and ethnic justice in our time, we look at the diversity of group formation, attend to conflicting claims to national belonging, and debate theoretical perspectives on race and ethnicity.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

OSPBER 174: Sports, Culture, and Gender in Comparative Perspective

Theory and history of mass spectator sports and their role in modern societies. Comparisons with U.S., Britain, and France; the peculiarities of sports in German culture. Body and competition cultures, with emphasis on the entry of women into sports, the modification of body ideals, and the formation and negotiation of gender identities in and through sports. The relationship between sports and politics, including the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED

OSPCPTWN 33: Southern Africa: from Liberation Struggles to Region-Building

Process by which the region moved from colonialism/apartheid to majority rule through a series of liberation struggles, and the outcomes of those struggles. Cases of Angola and Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Namibia and South Africa. Transitions from apartheid to democracy in Namibia and South Africa through negotiated settlements. Topics include: Truth and Reconciliation Commission; role of the Southern African Development Community; challenges in region today; influence of violent past and legacies of struggle against colonialism and apartheid on present situation.
| UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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