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421 - 430 of 698 results for: all courses

ILAC 240E: Borges and Philosophy

Analysis of the Argentine author's literary renditions of philosophical ideas. Topics may include: time, free will, infinitude, authorship and self, nominalism vs. realism, empiricism vs. idealism, skepticism, peripheral modernities, postmodernism, and Eastern thought. Close reading of short stories, poems, and essays from Labyrinths paired with selections by authors such as Augustine, Berkeley, James, and Lao Tzu. The course will be conducted in English; Spanish originals will be available. Satisfies the capstone seminar requirement for the major in Philosophy and Literature.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ILAC 241: Fiction Workshop in Spanish

Spanish and Spanish American short stories approached through narrative theory and craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of fiction (e.g. character and plot development, point of view, creating a scene, etc.). Students will write, workshop, and revise an original short story throughout the term. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Readings may include works by Ayala, Bolaño, Borges, Clarín, Cortázar, García Márquez, Piglia, Rodoreda, and others. Enrollment limited.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 243: The Millenium Novel in Latin America

Between 2000 and 2012, a young Spanish American novel emerges, taking at times a minimalist point of view to narrate individual stories with a subjective tone, or continuing a tradition of the historical panorama to present national tragedies that occurred in the last two or three decades. Focus is on this new type of novel from different countries, with such titles as "El cuerpo en que nací" by Guadalupe Entel; "Las teorías salvajes" by Pola Oloixarac; "El ruido de las cosas al caer" by Juan Gabriel Vazquez; and "Bonsai" by Alejandro Zambra, among others.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ILAC 263: Visions of the Andes (ILAC 363)

What visions of the Andes circulate in Latin American literature, photography and painting? How are they constructed? How is their value accrued? The course focuses on visual and written images of Andean landscapes. Beginning with 19th century technical photography, the course explores the visual economy of the Andes in representative texts and images from Peru, Bolivia and Chile, vis-à-vis critical discourses about Andean culture. In Spanish.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Briceno, X. (PI)

ILAC 277: Spanish and Society: Rock en EspaƱol

Can music be a medium to study how a society communicates? This course wants to answer this question by paying attention to how has Spanish changed and adapted in recent history. Taking rock and pop as a global musical phenomenon, the focus of the course will be the most prominent bands and songs in Spanish language. Emphasis is on the analysis of the use of Spanish in real-world contexts. In Spanish.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Briceno, X. (PI)

ILAC 278: Senior Seminar: Monsters of Modern Spanish Empire

Focus is on debates over the morality of empire and slavery in literary works from modern Spain and Cuba. Taught in Spanish.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Surwillo, L. (PI)

ILAC 278A: Senior Seminar: Pau-Brazil from Modernism to Concretism

From the historical Linguas people in Colonial Portuguese America to the Modern Galactic vision of Haroldo de Campos and his theory of translation as transcreation. A Cultural and Literary immersion in Brazilian history, in Luso-Afro-European-Amerindian plurilingualism and ethnic diversity. Authors include Pero Vaz de Caminha, Jean de Lery, Antonio Vieira, Oswald de Andrade, Mario de Andrade, Tarsila do Amaral, Augusto de Campos, Haroldo de Campos, Decio Pignatari, Helio Oiticica, Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, Andre Vallias, and Josely Vianna Baptista. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ILAC 280: Latin@ Literature (CHILATST 200, CSRE 200, ILAC 382)

Examines a diverse set of narratives by U.S. Latin@s of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Guatemalan, and Dominican heritage through the lens of latinidad. All share the historical experience of Spanish colonization and U.S. imperialism, yet their im/migration patterns differ, affecting social, cultural, and political trajectories in the US and relationships to "home" and "homeland," nation, diaspora, history, and memory. Explores how racialization informs genders as well as sexualities. Emphasis on textual analysis. Taught in English.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ILAC 287: Queer Raza (CHILATST 120, FEMGEN 120)

Examination of cultural representations by U.S. Latin@s that explore the following questions: How is the mutual constitution of race/sex/class/gender theorized and represented? How is desire racialized? How is racial difference produced through sex acts and what is the function of sex in racial (self)formation? How to reconcile pleasure and desire with histories of imperialism and (neo)colonialism and other structures of power? How do these texts reinforce or contest stereotypes and the "ideal" bodies of national identity? How do these texts produce queerness as a web of social relations?
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ITALIAN 41N: Imagining Italy

Preference to freshmen. To the English and American literary imagination, Italy has long been a source of fascination. During the past hundred years, writers from Nathaniel Hawthorne to Frances Mayes have explored the broad range of contradictory resonances of the Italian setting, in fiction, travel essays, and memoirs. While some writers have celebrated the sensuality of Italian culture and landscape, others have imagined Italy as a more dangerous place -- as dangerous as the erotic love with which it is often identified. The range of literary responses to Italy by writers in English during the past hundred years will be examined, and the ways in which our culture has continued to construct myths of Italy will be explored. We will also see how these myths have been transformed into commodities in today's consumer culture, making "Italy" one of the most profitable fictions in the marketplace. Taught in English.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
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