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411 - 420 of 698 results for: all courses

ILAC 133N: The Animal Within: Animal Presence in Latin American Narrative

How does the criterion for the division between the human and the animal take part on contemporary Latin American narrative? To what extent is this divide challenged or contested? The course combines a discussion of the literary works of authors like Jorge Luis Borges, Horacio Quiroga, Julio Cortázar, Mario Bellatin, Clarice Lispector, and José María Arguedas with a reflection on the animal and animality in the writings of Bataille, Derrida and Deleuze. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 134: In the First Person: Representation of the Self in Modern Latin America

This course examines different expressions of self-portrayal in Latin America from 1920s to the present. The course explores different models of self-shaping and forms of expression that draw contourns on self and identity in Latin America. After a brief consideration of the Inca Garcilaso, Sor Juana, J.F. Sarmiento, we examine the works of José Vasconcelos, Norah Lange, Victoria Ocampo, Frida Kahlo, José María Arguedas, Rosario Castellanos, Mario Bellatin, Tununa Mercado, Marcela Trujillo, Fernando Vallejo, among others. Taught in Spanish; Spanish proficiency required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 135: From Book to Screen: Brazilian Novels and Their Film Adaptations

Can the study of cinematographic adaptation of novels help us understand better the specific nature of literature and that of film? Addressing this central question, the course combines an introduction to Brazilian narrative (Euclides Da Cunha, Mário De Andrade, João Guimaraes Rosa, Graciliano Ramos, Rubem Fonseca, Clarice Lispector) and a panorama of Brazilian cinematography (from Cinema Novo to contemporary productions). The course offers a space for reflection on the multifaceted relationship between the literary and the cinematographic. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 136: Modern Iberian Literatures

1800 to the mid 20th century. Topics include: romanticism; realism and its variants; the turn of the century; modernism and the avant garde; the Civil War; and the first half of the 20th century. Authors may include Mariano Jose de Larra, Gustavo Adolfo Becquer, Rosalia de Castro, Benito Perez Galdos, Jacint Verdaguer, Eca de Queiros, Miguel de Unamuno, Ramon de Valle-Inclan, Antonio Machado, and Federico García Lorca. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Predmore, M. (PI)

ILAC 157: Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literatures

Survey of Iberian literature from the medieval and early modern periods. When covering texts in languages other than Spanish, translations into English or Spanish will be made available. Taught in Spanish; prerequisite: SPANLANG 13 or equivalen
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Malik, C. (PI)

ILAC 161: Modern Latin American Literature

From independence to the present. Topics include romantic allegories of thennation; modernism and postmodernism; avant-garde poetry; regionalism versus cosmopolitanism; indigenous and indigenist literature; magical realism and the literature of the boom; Afro-Hispanic literature; and testimonial narrative. Authors may include: Bolívar, Bello, Gómez de Avellaneda, Isaacs, Sarmiento, Machado de Assis, Darío, Martí­, Agustini, Vallejo, Huidobro, Borges, Cortázar, Neruda, Guillon, Rulfo, Ramos, Garcí­a Marquez, Lispector, and Bolaño. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 175: Daydreaming in Portugal and Brazil

This course explores the role of the imagination in 19th and 20th century Portuguese and Brazilian literature. We will read 4-5 novels, short stories and articles analyzing how and why authors recreate imaginary processes in their characters, and what these processes reveal about the socio-cultural contexts of their period. Authors include Raúl Brandão, Machado de Assis, Antonio Lobo Antunes, Raduan Nassar, and Álvaro Cardoso Gomes, with complementary short pieces by Fernando Pessoa, José Saramago, Mario de Andrade, Guimarães Rosa, and Clarice Lispector. Readings available in English and Portuguese. In English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 193: The Cinema of Pedro Almodovar (ILAC 393)

Pedro Almodóvar is one of the most recognizable auteur directors in the world today. His films express a hybrid and eclectic visual style and the blurring of frontiers between mass and high culture. Special attention is paid to questions of sexuality and the centering of usually marginalized characters. This course studies Pedro Almodóvar's development from his directorial debut to the present, from the "shocking" value of the early films to the award-winning mastery of the later ones. Prerequisite: ability to understand spoken Spanish. Readings in English. Midterm and final paper can be in English. Majors should write in Spanish.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 210: Queer Almodovar (FEMST 210)

Focus on the representation of non-normative sexualities and genders in films by Pedro Almodóvar, one of the most recognizable auteur directors in Europe today. Analysis of his hybrid and eclectic visual style complemented by critical and theoretical readings in queer studies. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 235: Critique of Technology (STS 200L)

Informed citizens living in today's world, and especially in Silicon Valley, should be able to formulate their own, articulate positions about the role of technology in culture. The course gives students the tools to do so. Against the trend towards the thoughtless celebration of all things technological, we will engage in critique in the two senses of the term: as careful study of the cultural implications of technology and as balanced, argumentative criticism. Can technology make life more meaningful, society more fair, people smarter, and the world smaller? Selections by fiction writers, philosophers and thinkers (such as Heidegger and Beller), as well as recent popular works of social commentary, such as You are not a Gadget, The Shallows, 24/7, and Present Shock.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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