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501 - 510 of 768 results for: all courses

HISTORY 257C: LGBT/Queer Life in the United States (FEMGEN 140D, FEMGEN 240D)

An introductory course that explores LGBT/Queer social, cultural, and political history in the United States. By analyzing primary documents that range from personal accounts (private letters, autobiography, early LGBT magazines, and oral history interviews) to popular culture (postcards, art, political posters, lesbian pulp fiction, and film) to medical, military, and legal papers, students will understand how the categories of gender and sexuality have changed over the past 150 years. This class investigates the relationship among queer, straight and transgender identities. Seminar discussions will question how the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality influenced the construction of these categories.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Davies, A. (PI)

HISTORY 258: Sexual Violence in America (AFRICAAM 192, AMSTUD 258, CSRE 192E, FEMGEN 258, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 358)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores the history of sexual violence in America, with particular attention to the intersections of gender and race in the construction of rape. We discuss the changing definitions of sexual violence in law and in cultural representations from early settlement through the late-twentieth century, including slavery, wartime and prison rape, the history of lynching and anti-lynching movements, and feminist responses to sexual violence. In addition to introducing students to the literature on sexual violence, the course attempts to teach critical skills in the analysis of secondary and primary historical texts. Students write short weekly reading responses and a final paper; no final exam; fifth unit research or CEL options.nnLimited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Submit application form and indicate interest in CEL option. Priority admission to History, FGSS, CSRE, AFRICAAM, and AMSTUD declared majors and minors. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

HISTORY 260D: The Asian American Movement: A History of Activism (ASNAMST 160D)

The "Asian American Movement" was born in the late 1960s inspired by other movements for social change and justice in the era. Activism among Asians in America has a longer history and a continuity to today. We will examine past, present, and future and consider issues of racial/ethnic identity, of inequality, and of injustice. We will explore avenues that sought remedy and progress. Political, social, cultural, gender and sexuality, and international dimensions will be considered. Note: Students who have taken History/AMSTUD/ ASNAMST 55D/155D should not enroll in this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Chang, G. (PI)

HISTORY 260K: Exploring American Religious History (AMSTUD 91, CSRE 91, RELIGST 91)

This course will trace how contemporary beliefs and practices connect to historical trends in the American religious landscape.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 263D: Junipero Serra

Why is Junipero Serra considered a representative figure of California? How have assessments of Serra evolved over the last 200 years? Why does his name appear so often on our campus? In this course we will consider these and other questions in terms of Spanish empire, Native American history, California politics of memory and commemoration, among other approachs. Requirements include weekly reading, class discussion, a field trip to Carmel Mission, short writing assignments, and a formal debate on the ethics naming university or public buildings after historical figures with contested pasts. Taught in English.
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 274E: Urban Poverty and Inequality in Latin America

We examine historical issues of social inequality, poverty, crime, industrialization, globalization, and environment in major Latin American cities.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 285G: The Holocaust: A Study in Genocide (HISTORY 385G, JEWISHST 285G, JEWISHST 385G)

This course will explore one of the most horrifying moments in history, the systematic political disenfranchisement and attempted extermination of Jews in the period 1933-1945. We will explore some of the more important and illustrative works regarding the Holocaust. Drawing upon scholarly, autobiographical, and fictional sources, students will gain a deeper appreciation for how the different figures have attempted to grapple with the catastrophe that struck European Jewry during the mid-Twentieth Century.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Meyers, J. (PI)

HISTORY 287D: A Survey of Jews in the Contemporary World (HISTORY 387D, JEWISHST 287D, JEWISHST 387D)

( History 287D is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 387D is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) This course will explore the notion of "traditional" vs "modern": the different ways in which Jewish communities have encountered "modernity," and what the modern era has meant has meant for different Jewish communities, whether in the Middle East, Europe, or North America.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Meyers, J. (PI)

HISTORY 291K: Korean History and Culture before 1900 (HISTORY 391K, KOREA 158, KOREA 258)

This course serves as an introduction to Korean culture, society, and history before the modern period. It begins with a discussion of early Korea and controversies over Korean origins; the bulk of the course will be devoted to the Chos'n period (1392-1910), that from the end of medieval Korea to the modern period. Topics to be covered include: Korean national and ethnic origins, the role of religious and intellectual traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, popular and indigenous religious practices, the traditional Korean family and social order, state and society during the Chos'n dynasty, vernacular prose literature, Korean's relations with its neighbors in East Asia, and changing conceptions of Korean identity.nThe course will be conducted through the reading and discussion of primary texts in English translation alongside scholarly research. As such, it will emphasize the interpretation of historical sources, which include personal letters, memoirs, and diaries, traditional histories, diplomatic and political documents, along with religious texts and works of art. Scholarly work will help contextualize these materials, while the class discussions will introduce students to existing scholarly debates about the Korean past. Students will be asked also to examine the premodern past with an eye to contemporary reception. The final project for the class is a film study, where a modern Korean film portraying premodern Korea will be analyzed as a case study of how the past works in public historical memory in contemporary Korea, both North and South. An open-ended research paper is also possible, pending instructor approval.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

HISTORY 292F: Culture and Religions in Korean History (HISTORY 392F)

This colloquium explores the major themes of Korean history before 1800 and the role of culture and religions in shaping the everyday life of Chosôn-dynasty Koreans. Themes include the aristocracy and military in the Koryô dynasty, Buddhism and Confucianism in the making of Chosôn Korea, kingship and court culture, slavery and women, family and rituals, death and punishment, and the Korean alphabet (Hangûl) and print culture.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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