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241 - 250 of 621 results for: all courses

FEMGEN 188Q: Imagining Women: Writers in Print and in Person (CSRE 188Q)

Gender roles, gender relations and sexual identity explored in contemporary literature and conversation with guest authors. Weekly meetings designated for book discussion and meeting with authors. Interest in writing and a curiosity about diverse women's lives would be helpful to students. Students will use such tools as close reading, research, analysis and imagination. Seminar requires strong voice of all participants. Oral presentations, discussion papers, final projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED, Writing 2
Instructors: Miner, V. (PI)

FILMSTUD 4: Introduction to Film Study: French Cinema in Focus

This course provides an introduction to film through the lens of French national cinema. We study the historical formation of the moving image in France (and beyond); from its humble beginnings as a novel attraction, to its rise as a major medium in its own right, appreciated for both its commercial and artistic appeal. We examine the work of a number of influential auteurs and key periods in the development of French national cinema: including the work of early masters Jean Vigo and Jean Renoir, members of the French New Wave Jean-Luc Godard and Agnès Varda, as well as contemporary filmmakers Mathieu Kassovitz and Olivier Assayas. In addition to undertaking a historical overview of French cinema, this course familiarizes students with a variety of approaches to the analysis of film style and form: mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, sound, performance, etc. While no prior knowledge of French cinema or film analysis is required, a willingness to engage deeply and critically with film is fundamental.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

FILMSTUD 100A: History of World Cinema I, 1895-1929 (FILMSTUD 300A)

This course begins at the end of the nineteenth century, when the purpose of cinema was questioned and debated, film grammar was just being invented, distribution and exhibition were haphazard, and writers internationally were registering surprise and wonder at the new medium. It ends with modernist masterpieces of the 1920s, subtle (and still relevant) critical debates about the aesthetics and politics of film, and the development of viable sound technologies. What could film have become and did not? How did storytelling come to dominate the development of the new medium? How and why did various national cinemas develop distinctive stylesâ¿¿classical Hollywood, French Impressionism, German Expressionism, Russian montageâ¿¿that shape screen arts to this day? How did influential critics understand cinema and the ways it could reflect and effect social change? To explore these questions you will work mainly with primary textsâ¿¿the films themselves, and criticism written contemporaneously with them. Lectures will help you place these filmic and critical texts within a larger narrative about the first thirty-five years of cinema.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

FILMSTUD 100B: History of World Cinema II: Critics, Curators Communities (FILMSTUD 300B)

The emphasis on studios, producers, directors, and stars in film historiography can blind us to the work of critics, curators, and film societies in developing and influencing film culture. Such work helped make possible various ¿new waves¿ and experimental cinemas. This course engages mid-twentieth-century cinema, in its great variety (short films, educational films, and influential feature-length films) by foregrounding the creativity of critics, curators, and audiences in understanding and shaping the film industries, technologies and aesthetics of their time.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

FILMSTUD 100C: History of World Cinema III, 1960-Present (FILMSTUD 300C)

This course will provide an overview of cinema from around the world since 1960, highlighting the cultural, political, and economic forces that have shaped various film movements over the last six decades. We will study some key film movements and national cinemas towards developing a historical appreciation of a variety of commercial and art film traditions. Through an exploration of films from Europe, Africa, Asia, and Latin America, we shall examine the industrial histories of non-Hollywood film production and exhibition practices that produce the particular cinematic cultures of each region.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

FILMSTUD 101: Fundamentals of Cinematic Analysis: Film Sound (FILMSTUD 301)

The close analysis of film. Emphasis is on formal and narrative techniques in structure and style, and detailed readings of brief sequences. Elements such as cinematography, mise-en-scène, composition, sound, and performance. Films from various historical periods, national cinemas, directors, and genres. Prerequisite: FILMSTUD 4 or equivalent. Recommended: ARTHIST 1 or FILMSTUD 102. Course can be repeated twice for a max of 8 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Repeatable 3 times (up to 12 units total)
Instructors: Ma, J. (PI)

FILMSTUD 102: Theories of the Moving Image (FILMSTUD 302)

Major theoretical arguments and debates about cinema: realism,formalism, poststructuralism, feminism, postmodernism, and phenomenology. Prerequisites: FILMSTUD 4.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Oeler, K. (PI)

FILMSTUD 110: Science Fiction Cinema (FILMSTUD 310)

Science fiction film's sense of wonder depends upon the development and revelation of new ways of seeing. The American science fiction film emphasizes the fundamental activity of human perception, its relation to bodily experience and the exploration of other worlds, new cities, and other modes of being, in such new technological spaces as the cyberspaces of the information age. It is perhaps the Hollywood genre most directly concerned with the essence of cinema itself.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

FILMSTUD 114: Reading Comics (AMSTUD 114X, FILMSTUD 314)

The modern medium of comics, a history that spans 150 years. The flexibility of the medium encountered through the genres of humorous and dramatic comic strips, superheroes, undergrounds, independents, journalism, and autobiography. Innovative creators including McCay, Kirby, Barry, Ware, and critical writings including McCloud, Eisner, Groenstee. Topics include text/image relations, panel-to-panel relations, the page, caricature, sequence, seriality, comics in the context of the fine arts, and relations to other media.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

FILMSTUD 116: International Documentary (FILMSTUD 316)

Historical, aesthetic, and formal developments of documentary through nonfiction films in Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
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