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341 - 350 of 639 results for: all courses

HISTORY 254D: Religion and War in America (AMSTUD 105R, CSRE 105, HISTORY 354D, RELIGST 105)

Scholars have devoted much attention to wars in American history, but have not agreed as to whether religion was a major cause or simply a cover for political, economic, and other motives. We will compare interpretations that leave religion out, with those that take it into account. We will also look at the impact of war on the religious lives of ordinary Americans. We will examine both secondary as well as primary sources, beginning with King Philip's War in the 17th century, and ending with the "War on Terror" in the present day.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 255: Martin Luther King, Jr.: The Social Gospel and the Struggle for Justice

The religious and political thought of Martin Luther King, Jr., using the documentary resources of the King Institute at Stanford. His social gospel Christianity and prophetic message of radical social transformation. Readings include the forthcoming The Papers of Martin Luther King, Jr., Volume VI: Advocate of the Social Gospel.
Last offered: Autumn 2006 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 256G: Constructing Race and Religion in America (AFRICAAM 236, AMSTUD 246, CSRE 246, HISTORY 356G, RELIGST 246, RELIGST 346)

This seminar focuses on the interrelationships between social constructions of race, and social interpretations of religion in America. How have assumptions about race shaped religious worldviews? How have religious beliefs shaped racial attitudes? How have ideas about religion and race contributed to notions of what it means to be "American"? We will look at primary and secondary sources, and at the historical development of ideas and practices over time.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 296: Communism and Revolution in China

From the formation of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) in 1921 through the 1949 founding of the People's Republic of China (PRC). Topics include: early theories of socialism in China; the relationship between Chinese communism and the Communist International and Soviet Union; agrarian reformulation of communism by Mao; the communist-nationalist civil war; the Communist Revolution of 1949; and the consolidation of communist power in the PRC.
Last offered: Spring 2009 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 297F: Religion and Power in the Making of Modern South Asia (RELIGST 255, RELIGST 355)

This course examines the diverse ways that religious traditions have been involved in the brokering of power in South Asia from the late seventeenth century to the present day. We will examine the intersection of religion and power in different arenas, including historical memory, religious festivals, language politics, and violent actions. At the core of our inquiry is how religion is invoked in political contexts (and vice-versa), public displays of religiosity, and the complex dynamics of religion and the state. Among other issues, we will particularly engage with questions of religious identity, knowledge, and violence. Undergraduates must enroll in RELIGST 255 for 5 units. Graduate students must enroll RELIGST 355 for 3-5 units. HISTORY297F must be taken for 4-5 units.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HPS 60: Introduction to Philosophy of Science (PHIL 60, STS 200S)

This course introduces students to tools for the philosophical analysis of science. We will cover issues in observation, experiment, and reasoning, questions about the aims of science, scientific change, and the relations between science and values. STS majors cannot take STS 200S if they have previously taken PHIL 60. Priority is given to STS seniors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Longino, H. (PI)

HPS 61: Philosophy and the Scientific Revolution (PHIL 61)

Galileo's defense of the Copernican world-system that initiated the scientific revolution of the 17th century, led to conflict between science and religion, and influenced the development of modern philosophy. Readings focus on Galileo and Descartes.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HUMBIO 174A: Ethics in a Human Life (ETHICSOC 174, PHIL 74A)

Ethical questions pervade a human life from before a person is conceived until after she dies, and at every point in between. This course raises a series of ethical questions, following along the path of a person's life - questions that arise before, during, and after she lives it. We will explore distinctive questions that a life presents at each of several familiar stages: prior to birth, childhood, adulthood, death, and even beyond. We will consider how some philosophers have tried to answer these questions, and we will think about how answering them might help us form a better understanding of the ethical shape of a human life as a whole.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ER

ILAC 130: Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives

The purpose of this course is to study major figures and historical trends in modern Iberia against the background of the linguistic plurality and cultural complexity of the Iberian world. We will cover the period from the loss of the Spanish empire, through the civil wars and dictatorships to the end of the Portuguese Estado Novo and the monarchic restoration in Spain. Particular attention will be given to the Peninsula's difficult negotiation of its cultural and national diversity, with an emphasis on current events. This course is designed to help prepare students for their participation in the Stanford overseas study program in Spain. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Resina, J. (PI)

ILAC 131: Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives

Part of the Gateways to the World program, this is an introductory course for all things Latin American: culture, history, literature, and current events. By combining lecture and seminar formats, the class prepares you for all subsequent research on, and learning about, the region. Comparative discussion of independence movements in Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, the Andean Region, Brazil, and the Southern Cone. Other topics vary yearly, including: representations of ethnicity and class, the Cold War, popular culture, as well as major thinkers and writers. Open to all. Recommended for students who want to study abroad in Santiago, Chile. Required for majors in Spanish or Iberian and Latin American Cultures (ILAC). In Spanish.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Hughes, N. (PI)
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