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601 - 610 of 657 results for: all courses

RELIGST 227: The Qur'an (RELIGST 327)

Early history, themes, structure, chronology, and premodern interpretation. Relative chronology of passages.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2007 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

RELIGST 230B: Zen Studies (RELIGST 330B)

Readings in recent English-language scholarship on Chan and Zen Buddhism
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2011 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

RELIGST 231: European Reformations (HISTORY 231G, HISTORY 331G, RELIGST 331)

Readings in and discussion of theological and social aspects of sixteenth century reformations: Luther, Radical Reform, Calvin, and Council of Trent, missionary expansion, religious conflict, creative and artistic expressions. Texts include primary sources and secondary scholarly essays and monographs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

RELIGST 235: Religion in Modern Society: Secularization and the Sacred (RELIGST 335)

What is the status of religion in modern life? Is the modern world "secular" in some fundamental, irreversible way and what does this mean? This course will explore these questions through variety of readings from leading sociologists, philosophers, and anthropologists. Our goal will be to understand in what ways industrialization, political liberalization, the rise of technology, and the success of modern science have been used to support the "secularization" thesis that the modern West rendered religion a thing of the past. A central question to be asked will be: do assessments of the place of religion in modernity necessitate a philosophy of history i.e., a theory not only of historical change, but of the meaning of this change as well?n The course will begin by looking at the origins of the theory of secularization from its beginnings in Enlightenment attempts to understand the meaning of history. We will then turn to contemporary debates over the term "secular" against its counterpart, "religious", and the problems with their application to non-Western societies. We will read works by Talal Asad, Saba Mahmood, Max Weber, Charles Taylor, Jürgen Habermas, and Pope Benedict XVI.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

RELIGST 239: Luther and the Reform of Western Christianity (RELIGST 339)

Luther's theology, ethics, biblical interpretation, and social reforms and their significance for the remaking of Western Christianity. Readings include Luther's own writings and secondary sources about Luther and his world.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2012 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

RELIGST 245: Religion, Reason, and Romanticism

The late 18th-century European cultural shift from rationalist to romantic modes of thought and sensibility. Debates about religion as catalysts for the new Zeitgeist. Readings include: the Jewish metaphysician, Mendelssohn; the dramatist, Lessing; the philosopher of language and history, Herder; the critical idealist, Kant; and the transcendental idealist, Fichte.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2007 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

RELIGST 246: Constructing Race and Religion in America (AFRICAAM 236, AMSTUD 246, CSRE 246, HISTORY 256G, HISTORY 356G, RELIGST 346)

This seminar focuses on the interrelationships between social constructions of race, and social interpretations of religion in America. How have assumptions about race shaped religious worldviews? How have religious beliefs shaped racial attitudes? How have ideas about religion and race contributed to notions of what it means to be "American"? We will look at primary and secondary sources, and at the historical development of ideas and practices over time.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

RELIGST 250: Classics of Indian Buddhism

Texts in English translation includING discourses (sutras), philosophical treatises, commentaries, didactic epistles, hymns, biographies, and narratives.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2008 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

RELIGST 251: Readings in Indian Buddhist Texts (RELIGST 351)

Introduction to Buddhist literature through reading original texts in Sanskrit. Prerequisite: Sanskrit. Undergraduates register for 251 for 5 units. Graduate students register for 351 for 3-5 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Harrison, P. (PI)

RELIGST 252: Hearts and Diamonds: The Lives of Buddhist Sacred Texts

An exploration of two key Mahayana Buddhist scriptures (the Heart & Diamond Sutras) and their histories, looking at what they say and how they have been used, from the first millennium to the present day.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2012 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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