2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

31 - 40 of 56 results for: VPGE::Specialized ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

EFSLANG 698A: Writing Academic English

Strategies and conventions for graduate writing. Emphasis is on fluency, organization, documentation, and appropriateness for writing tasks required in course work. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

EFSLANG 698B: Advanced Graduate Writing

Focus on clarity, accuracy, and appropriate style. For graduate students experienced in English writing and currently required to write for courses and research. Class meetings and individual conferences. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 698A. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

EFSLANG 698C: Writing and Presenting Research

For advanced graduate students completing major research projects. Revising and editing strategies for preparing papers, conference abstracts, and poster presentations. Practice adapting written and oral presentational content and style to different audiences. Students present their research and receive instructor and peer feedback, with regular individual tutorials in addition to class work. Enrollment limited to 12. May be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: Students required by the EFS Placement Exam to take EFSLANG 691, 697, 698A, or 698B may not enroll in 698C until those requirements have been fulfilled. Others may sign up directly.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hubbard, P. (PI)

ENGR 202W: Technical Communication

This course focuses on how to write clear, concise, and organized technical writing. Through interactive presentations, group workshops, and individual conferences, students learn best practices for communicating to academic and professional audiences for a range of purposes.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3

ETHICSOC 278M: Introduction to Environmental Ethics (ETHICSOC 178M, PHIL 178M, PHIL 278M, POLISCI 134L)

How should human beings relate to the natural world? Do we have moral obligations toward non-human animals and other parts of nature? And what do we owe to other human beings, including future generations, with respect to the environment? The first part of this course will examine such questions in light of some of our current ethical theories: considering what those theories suggest regarding the extent and nature of our environmental obligations; and also whether reflection on such obligations can prove informative about the adequacy of our ethical theories. In the second part of the course, we will use the tools that we have acquired to tackle various ethical questions that confront us in our dealings with the natural world, looking at subjects such as: animal rights; conservation; economic approaches to the environment; access to and control over natural resources; environmental justice and pollution; climate change; technology and the environment; and environmental activism.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Adams, M. (PI)

HRP 206: Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis (CHPR 206, MED 206, STATS 211)

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

HRP 223: Introduction to Data Management and Analysis in SAS

Provides hands-on introduction to basic data management and analysis techniques using SAS. Data management topics include: Introduction to SAS and SAS syntax, importing data, creating and reading SAS datasets, data cleaning and validation, creating new variables, and combining data sets. Analysis techniques include: basic descriptive statistics (e.g., means, frequency) and bivariate procedures for continuous and categorical variables (e.g., t-tests, chi-squares).
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

HRP 237: Practical Approaches to Global Health Research (INTLPOL 290, MED 226)

(Formerly IPS 290) How do you come up with an idea for a useful research project in a low resource setting? How do you develop a research question, prepare a concept note, and get your project funded? How do you manage personnel in the field, complex cultural situations, and unexpected problems? How do you create a sampling strategy, select a study design, and ensure ethical conduct with human subjects? This course takes students through the process of health research in under-resourced countries from the development of the initial research question and literature review to securing support and detailed planning for field work. Students progressively develop and receive weekly feedback on a concept note to support a funding proposal addressing a research question of their choosing. Aimed at graduate students interested in global health research, though students of all disciplines interested in practical methods for research are welcome. Undergraduates who have completed 85 units or more may enroll with instructor consent. Sign up for 1 unit credit to audit class sessions or 3 units to both participate in classes and develop a concept note."
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3
Instructors: Luby, S. (PI)

HRP 244: Developing Measurement Tools for Health Research

The focus of this course is on providing the skills necessary to develop, validate and administer both qualitative and quantitative measures and instruments. Topics will include creating valid measures, ensuring the measures used address and apply to the research questions, design and samples; determining when to use standardized measures or develop new ones; instrument validation techniques; factor analysis; and survey administration, including determining the most effective way of administering measures (e.g., online, paper-and-pencil, ACASI) and the best way to design the survey.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

HRP 264: Foundations of Statistical and Scientific Inference (STATS 264)

The course will consist of readings and discussion of foundational papers and book sections in the domains of statistical and scientific inference. Topics to be covered include philosophy of science, interpretations of probability, Bayesian and frequentist approaches to statistical inference and current controversies about the proper use of p-values and research reproducibility. nnRecommended preparation: At least 2 quarters of biostatistics and one of epidemiology. Intended for second year Masters students, of PhD students with as least 1 year of preceding graduate training.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Goodman, S. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints