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1 - 10 of 18 results for: VPGE::Personal ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

AFRICAAM 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (CSRE 245, EDUC 245, PSYCH 245A)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials. Students will work with community partners to better understand the nuances of racial and ethnic identity development in different contexts. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

BIOS 225: Diversity and Inclusion in STEMM

Introduction to the social science literature on factors contributing to gender disparities in the scientific workplace (e.g. implicit bias and stereotype threat). Discussions focus on steps that individuals and institutions can take to promote the advancement of women and other underrepresented groups in science, and thus promote the advancement of science.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2

CSRE 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, EDUC 245, PSYCH 245A)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials. Students will work with community partners to better understand the nuances of racial and ethnic identity development in different contexts. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

EDUC 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, CSRE 245, PSYCH 245A)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials. Students will work with community partners to better understand the nuances of racial and ethnic identity development in different contexts. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

ENGR 217: Expanding Engineering Limits: Culture, Diversity, and Equity (CSRE 117, CSRE 217, ENGR 117, FEMGEN 117, FEMGEN 217)

This course investigates how culture and diversity shape who becomes an engineer, what problems get solved, and the quality of designs, technology, and products. As a course community, we consider how cultural beliefs about race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, abilities, socioeconomic status, and other intersectional aspects of identity interact with beliefs about engineering, influence diversity in the field, and affect equity in engineering education and practice. We also explore how engineering cultures and environments respond to and change with individual and institutional agency. The course involves weekly presentations by scholars and engineers, readings, short writing assignments, small-group discussion, and hands-on, student-driven projects. Students can enroll in the course for 1 unit (lectures only), or 3 units (lectures+discussion+project). For 1 unit, students should sign up for Section 1 and Credit/No Credit grading, and for 3 units students should sign up for Section 2 and either the C/NC or Grade option.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

ENGR 248: Principled Entrepreneurial Decisions (ENGR 148)

Principled Entrepreneurial Decisions examines how leaders tackle significant inflection points that occur in high-growth entrepreneurial companies. Students learn how to develop principles as a powerful tool to face tough situations that they will encounter in their lives and their chosen career. Cases and guest speakers discuss not only the business rationale for the decisions taken but also how their principles affected those decisions. A capstone project provides frameworks for students to develop their own set of principles. The teaching team brings its wealth of experience in both entrepreneurship and VC investing to the class. Limited enrollment. Admission by application: https://forms.gle/VU36jjGwmsK54CsK9
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3

ENGR 311A: Women's Perspectives

Graduate seminar featuring non-technical talks by engineers from academia and industry. The theme for 2024 is "Let's Get Real!" Discussion is encouraged as graduate students share experiences and learn with speakers and each other. Possible topics of discussion range from time management and career choices to diversity, health, and family. Several optional informal dinners are hosted after the seminar to continue conversation with the speakers. Speaker list will be posted at: https://stanfordmewomen.weebly.com/seminar.html. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Sheppard, S. (PI)

ENGR 311B: Designing the Professional

Wondering how to weave together what really fits you, is doable, and will be satisfying and meaningful? Have more questions than answers? Have too many ideas for your career, or not enough? This course applies the mindsets and innovation principles of design thinking to the "wicked problem" of designing your life and vocation. Students gain awareness and empathy, define areas of life and work on which they want to work, ideate about ways to move forward, try small prototypes, and test their assumptions. The course is highly interactive. It will conclude with creation of 3 versions of the next 5 years and prototype ideas to begin making those futures a reality. The course will include brief readings, writing, reflections, and in-class exercises. Expect to practice ideation and prototyping methodologies, decision making practices and to participate in interactive activities in pairs, trios, and small groups. Seminar open to all graduate students and Postdocs in all 7 schools. Additional course information at http://lifedesignlab.stanford.edu/dtp.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

ENGR 311D: Portfolio to Professional: Supporting the Development of Digital Presence Through ePortfolios

This course guides graduate students in creating a professional ePortfolio and establishing an online presence. The course includes seminar-style presentations and discussions, opportunities for feedback with career mentors, classmates, alumni, employers, and other community members using think-aloud protocols and peer review approaches. Curriculum modules focus on strategies for telling your story in the digital environment, platform considerations, evidence and architecture, visual design and user experience. Open to all graduate students and majors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

GSBGEN 208: Leading with Values

With leadership comes responsibility. This course explores the numerous ethical issues faced by managers and organizations and provides both analytical frameworks and the latest findings on human behavior to inform ethical decisions and strategies. The readings present challenging and controversial case studies, provide insights from experimental psychology and economics, and discuss relevant philosophical concepts and arguments. Through class exercises, rigorous discussion, and personal reflection, you will clarify your own ethical stance, think through ethical dilemmas, and practice articulating recommendations compellingly. You will also discover the diversity of ethical viewpoints and find out how to avoid the social and cognitive pitfalls that can make ethical leadership challenging.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
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