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1 - 10 of 29 results for: VPGE::Personal ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

AFRICAAM 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (CSRE 245, EDUC 245, PSYCH 245A)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials. Students will work with community partners to better understand the nuances of racial and ethnic identity development in different contexts. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

BIOS 282: Clarifying Career Choices: Your Self-Reflective Research Project

Using the ADAPT Integrated Development Model, this course will focus on the areas of Development and Awareness. It is designed for students who aspire to gain clarity and insights about themselves their career choices and options. It is designed to encourage self-knowledge and increased awareness of roles and job opportunities inside and outside of academia, where an in-depth Science background is desired. The course requires students to complete up to 3 assessments, short writing assignments, and participate in small group discussions. All students will have the opportunity to have a 1:1 follow-up session with the Instructor to discuss the insights gained from the course as well as opportunities to network with alumni and future employers from various fields.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

CSRE 217: Expanding Engineering Limits: Culture, Diversity, and Equity (CSRE 117, ENGR 117, ENGR 217, FEMGEN 117, FEMGEN 217)

This course investigates how culture and diversity shape who becomes an engineer, what problems get solved, and the quality of designs, technology, and products. As a course community, we consider how cultural beliefs about race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, abilities, socioeconomic status, and other intersectional aspects of identity interact with beliefs about engineering, influence diversity in the field, and affect equity in engineering education and practice. We also explore how engineering cultures and environments respond to and change with individual and institutional agency. The course involves weekly presentations by scholars and engineers, readings, short writing assignments, small-group discussion, and hands-on, student-driven projects. Students can enroll in the course for 1 unit (lectures only), or 3 units (lectures+discussion+project). For 1 unit, students should sign up for Section 1 and Credit/No Credit grading, and for 3 units students should sign up for Section 2 and either the C/NC or Grade option.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CSRE 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, EDUC 245, PSYCH 245A)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials. Students will work with community partners to better understand the nuances of racial and ethnic identity development in different contexts. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

DESINST 311: Design Abilities Studio

In this Design Abilities Studio students will learn and practice several applied skills with hands-on activities that vary in length, duration, deliverables, and concept. This course focuses on developing core design abilities that make individuals better design thinkers and creative problem solvers. This class is for students of any discipline. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

DESINST 366: Creative Gym: A Design Thinking Skills Studio

Build your creative confidence and sharpen your design thinking skills. Train your intuition and expand the design context from which you operate every day. This experimental studio will introduce d.school students to fast- paced experiential exercises that lay the mental and physical foundation for a potent bias toward action, and a wider knowledge of the personal skills that expert design thinkers utilize in all phases of their process. Recent research based on this course curriculum show that performing these class activities will expand your creative capacity in statistically significant ways.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

EARTH 200A: Your Professional Development

Navigating the transition from student to professional is a daunting and often times unpredictable journey. This course is designed to help start the process of career planning and development early on. Beginning with navigating career uncertainty, through thoughtful self-assessment, to resume building, the power of negotiation, and managing up - this course builds a solid foundation on which to explore your long-term career goals.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)
Instructors: Yau, A. (PI)

EDUC 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, CSRE 245, PSYCH 245A)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials. Students will work with community partners to better understand the nuances of racial and ethnic identity development in different contexts. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

EDUC 377C: Philanthropy, Inclusivity and Leadership

(Same as GSBGEN 581) A philanthropist is anyone who gives anything-time, expertise, networks, credibility, influence, dollars, experience-in any amount to create a better world. Regardless of one's age, background or profession, everyone has the potential to lead in a way that both tackles the complex social problems our interconnected world faces and creates greater inclusivity, access and impact. This demanding two-week, compressed course will provide passionate students with a brave space to develop and refine a plan for their own social change journey and amplify their potential to give, live and lead in a way that matters more. Using design thinking, students will challenge their preconceptions and wrestle with their social change approach, their privileged position as future Stanford graduates and philanthropy's role in society. Lectures and class discussions will inspire and prepare students to create social value with greater intentionality and humility. For the first class, s more »
(Same as GSBGEN 581) A philanthropist is anyone who gives anything-time, expertise, networks, credibility, influence, dollars, experience-in any amount to create a better world. Regardless of one's age, background or profession, everyone has the potential to lead in a way that both tackles the complex social problems our interconnected world faces and creates greater inclusivity, access and impact. This demanding two-week, compressed course will provide passionate students with a brave space to develop and refine a plan for their own social change journey and amplify their potential to give, live and lead in a way that matters more. Using design thinking, students will challenge their preconceptions and wrestle with their social change approach, their privileged position as future Stanford graduates and philanthropy's role in society. Lectures and class discussions will inspire and prepare students to create social value with greater intentionality and humility. For the first class, students will submit a proposed social impact plan for their professional, philanthropic and civic lives. Over the course's six sessions, students will refine their plan, creating a formal theory of change that strategically utilizes their unique leadership platform and asset portfolio to advance opportunity and justice for a target population. Potential guest speakers include Darren Walker, President of the Ford Foundation; Justin Steele, Principal at Google.org; Crystal Hayling, Executive Director of the Libra Foundation; Rob Reich of Stanford PACS and Laura Muñoz Arnold, Co-Chair of the Laura and John Arnold Foundation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

EDUC 426: Unleashing Personal Potential: Behavioral Science and Design Thinking Applied to Self (PSYCH 264)

This course facilitates the application of the methods, theories, and findings of behavioral science to students own lives and improvement projects. It does so by combining behavioral science with a design thinking approach. You will learn to identify your potential, navigate to achieve it, and stay resilient during the journey. Students will design their own action plans, define goals and prototype strategies to test them, in an iterative feedback cycle. Our course thus blends two intellectual streams that seldom intersect: behavioral science and design thinking.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4
Instructors: Cohen, G. (PI)
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