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1 - 10 of 19 results for: VPGE::Personal ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

BIOS 225: Diversity and Inclusion in Science

Introduction to the social science literature on factors contributing to gender disparities in the scientific workplace (e.g. implicit bias and stereotype threat). Discussions focus on steps that individuals and institutions can take to promote the advancement of women and other underrepresented groups in science, and thus promote the advancement of science.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

CSRE 217: Expanding Engineering Limits: Culture, Diversity, and Equity (CSRE 117, ENGR 117, ENGR 217, FEMGEN 117, FEMGEN 217)

This course investigates how culture and diversity shape who becomes an engineer, what problems get solved, and the quality of designs, technology, and products. As a course community, we consider how cultural beliefs about race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, abilities, socioeconomic status, and other intersectional aspects of identity interact with beliefs about engineering, influence diversity in the field, and affect equity in engineering education and practice. We also explore how engineering cultures and environments respond to and change with individual and institutional agency. The course involves weekly presentations by scholars and engineers, readings, short writing assignments, small-group discussion, and hands-on, student-driven projects. Students can enroll in the course for 1 unit (lectures only), or 3 units (lectures+discussion+project). For 1 unit, students should sign up for Section 1 and Credit/No Credit grading, and for 3 units students should sign up for Section 2 and either the C/NC or Grade option.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

DESINST 366: Creative Gym: A Design Thinking Skills Studio

Build your creative confidence and sharpen your design thinking skills. Train your intuition and expand the design context from which you operate every day. This experimental studio will introduce d.school students to fast- paced experiential exercises that lay the mental and physical foundation for a potent bias toward action, and a wider knowledge of the personal skills that expert design thinkers utilize in all phases of their process. Recent research based on this course curriculum show that performing these class activities will expand your creative capacity in statistically significant ways.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

ENGR 217: Expanding Engineering Limits: Culture, Diversity, and Equity (CSRE 117, CSRE 217, ENGR 117, FEMGEN 117, FEMGEN 217)

This course investigates how culture and diversity shape who becomes an engineer, what problems get solved, and the quality of designs, technology, and products. As a course community, we consider how cultural beliefs about race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, abilities, socioeconomic status, and other intersectional aspects of identity interact with beliefs about engineering, influence diversity in the field, and affect equity in engineering education and practice. We also explore how engineering cultures and environments respond to and change with individual and institutional agency. The course involves weekly presentations by scholars and engineers, readings, short writing assignments, small-group discussion, and hands-on, student-driven projects. Students can enroll in the course for 1 unit (lectures only), or 3 units (lectures+discussion+project). For 1 unit, students should sign up for Section 1 and Credit/No Credit grading, and for 3 units students should sign up for Section 2 and either the C/NC or Grade option.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

ENGR 248: Principled Entrepreneurial Decisions (ENGR 148)

Examines how leaders tackle significant events that occur in high-growth entrepreneurial companies. Students prepare their minds for the difficult entrepreneurial situations that they will encounter in their lives in whatever their chosen career. Cases and guest speakers discuss not only the business rationale for the decisions taken but also how their principles affected those decisions. The teaching team brings its wealth of experience in both entrepreneurship and VC investing to the class. Previous entrepreneurship coursework or experience preferred. Limited enrollment. Admission by application: http://web.stanford.edu/class/engr248/apply.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

ENGR 311A: Women's Perspectives

Graduate seminar series, driven by student interests, with guest speakers from academia and industry. Previous themes have included Finding your North, Becoming Fearless, Daydreams to Reality, and Letters to My Younger Self. Discussion is encouraged as graduate students share experiences and learn with speakers and each other. Possible topics of discussion range from time management and career choices to diversity, health, and family. Several optional informal dinners are hosted after the seminar to continue conversation with the speakers. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Sheppard, S. (PI)

ENGR 311B: Designing the Professional

Wondering how to weave together what really fits you, is doable, and will be satisfying and meaningful? Have more questions than answers? Have too many ideas for your career, or not enough? This course applies the mindsets and innovation principles of design thinking to the "wicked problem" of designing your life and vocation. Students gain awareness and empathy, define areas of life and work on which they want to work, ideate about ways to move forward, try small prototypes, and test their assumptions. The course is highly interactive. It will conclude with creation of 3 versions of the next 5 years and prototype ideas to begin making those futures a reality. The course will include brief readings, writing, reflections, and in-class exercises. Expect to practice ideation and prototyping methodologies, decision making practices and to participate in interactive activities in pairs, trios, and small groups. Seminar open to all graduate students and Postdocs in all 7 schools.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

GSBGEN 208: Leading with Values

With leadership comes responsibility. This course explores the numerous ethical issues faced by managers and organizations and provides analytical frameworks as well as the latest findings on human behavior to inform ethical decisions and strategies. Readings involve controversial case studies, insights from experimental psychology and economics, and a brief introduction to some relevant philosophy. Through class exercises, rigorous discussion, and personal reflection, you will clarify your own ethical stance, think through ethical dilemmas, practice articulating recommendations compellingly, discover the diversity of ethical viewpoints, and find out how to avoid the social and cognitive pitfalls that come in the way of ethical leadership.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

GSBGEN 310: Business and AI: Lessons from Entrepreneurs, Executives, and Investors

There is no denying that we are in the AI-era: around 90% of tech executives today embrace AI and want to expand its use. Firms will be newly created to focus on AI products, or large firms will find new capabilities in AI products or processes. How will AI be used to create a sustainable competitive advantage for these firms? For this course, you do not need any prior experience or in-depth technical knowledge of AI; you will learn it along the way. This course invites guest speakers who run businesses at the forefront of AI to tell their stories and develop students¿ understanding of the business value of AI. Our speakers range from serial entrepreneurs to executives at well-known companies, all helpful in offering valuable insights from a myriad of industries and perspectives. Some key questions are the following. Should a company adopt AI, given that many but not all of its competitors are? Should they develop their own AI tools, or would it be easier to acquire a startup outright? more »
There is no denying that we are in the AI-era: around 90% of tech executives today embrace AI and want to expand its use. Firms will be newly created to focus on AI products, or large firms will find new capabilities in AI products or processes. How will AI be used to create a sustainable competitive advantage for these firms? For this course, you do not need any prior experience or in-depth technical knowledge of AI; you will learn it along the way. This course invites guest speakers who run businesses at the forefront of AI to tell their stories and develop students¿ understanding of the business value of AI. Our speakers range from serial entrepreneurs to executives at well-known companies, all helpful in offering valuable insights from a myriad of industries and perspectives. Some key questions are the following. Should a company adopt AI, given that many but not all of its competitors are? Should they develop their own AI tools, or would it be easier to acquire a startup outright? And for startups, what are the ways they market themselves? Why, and how, did particular startups succeed? And, in cases when there is a winner-take-all market, why did early investors believe in them? This class utilizes interactions with guest speakers and some Role Plays and lectures. The course requirements are three 800-word memos, one consulting-like group project, and class participation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Shaw, K. (PI)

GSBGEN 368: Managing Difficult Conversations

This elective 3- unit course is offered with Pass-Fail grading to MBA students who aspire to improve their ability to deal effectively with difficult professional and personal interpersonal situations. Class is held Tuesday, 3:10-6:10 PM. The course will be taught by William F. Meehan III, the Raccoon Partners Lecturer in Management and Senior Partner Emeritus, McKinsey and Company, and Charles G. Prober, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology & Immunology and Senior Associate Vice Provost for Health Education, Stanford School of Medicine. The course, which is case/vignette-based, involves frequent student-to-student and student-to-instructor role-playing in authentic business and medical interactions. GSBGEN 368 is cross-listed with Inde 238, which draws primarily medical students, and part of the learning environment of the course is the mix of perspectives and vignettes we role play and discuss. Topic-specific experts often will be present to participate as class guests. Rele more »
This elective 3- unit course is offered with Pass-Fail grading to MBA students who aspire to improve their ability to deal effectively with difficult professional and personal interpersonal situations. Class is held Tuesday, 3:10-6:10 PM. The course will be taught by William F. Meehan III, the Raccoon Partners Lecturer in Management and Senior Partner Emeritus, McKinsey and Company, and Charles G. Prober, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology & Immunology and Senior Associate Vice Provost for Health Education, Stanford School of Medicine. The course, which is case/vignette-based, involves frequent student-to-student and student-to-instructor role-playing in authentic business and medical interactions. GSBGEN 368 is cross-listed with Inde 238, which draws primarily medical students, and part of the learning environment of the course is the mix of perspectives and vignettes we role play and discuss. Topic-specific experts often will be present to participate as class guests. Relevant principles of professionalism, leadership, and psychology underlie the course pedagogy. Students will be expected to attend all classes unless excused in advance.nClass preparation will include reading of assigned cases/vignettes, analysis of the situations presented and recommendations as to how to confront specific difficult conversations; and reading of assigned background material. It is important that all students participate actively in classroom discussions. Class size will be limited to 45 students per the following: (1) a maximum of 30 MBA students and (2) a maximum of 15 medical or other non-GSB graduate students. GSB students enroll under GSBGEN 368. Please email Dr. Prober or Professor Meehan directly if you have any questions.n.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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