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1 - 10 of 56 results for: VPGE::Interdisciplinary ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

BIO 208: Spanish in Science/Science in Spanish (EARTHSYS 207, LATINAM 207)

For graduate and undergraduate students interested in the natural sciences and the Spanish language. Students will acquire the ability to communicate in Spanish using scientific language and will enhance their ability to read scientific literature written in Spanish. Emphasis on the development of science in Spanish-speaking countries or regions. Course is conducted in Spanish and intended for students pursuing degrees in the sciences, particularly disciplines such as ecology, environmental science, sustainability, resource management, anthropology, and archeology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)
Instructors: Dirzo, R. (PI)

BIOE 273: Biodesign for Digital Health (MED 273)

Health care is facing significant cross-industry challenges and opportunities created by a number of factors, including the increasing need for improved access to affordable, high-quality care; growing demand from consumers for greater control of their health and health data; the shift in focus from sick care to prevention and health optimization; aging demographics and the increased burden of chronic conditions; and new emphasis on real-world, measurable health outcomes for individuals and populations. Moreover, the delivery of health information and services is no longer tied to traditional brick and mortar hospitals and clinics: it has increasingly become "mobile," enabled by apps, sensors, wearables. Simultaneously, it has been augmented and often revolutionized by emerging digital and information technologies, as well as by the data that these technologies generate. This multifactorial transformation presents opportunities for innovation across the entire cycle of care, from welln more »
Health care is facing significant cross-industry challenges and opportunities created by a number of factors, including the increasing need for improved access to affordable, high-quality care; growing demand from consumers for greater control of their health and health data; the shift in focus from sick care to prevention and health optimization; aging demographics and the increased burden of chronic conditions; and new emphasis on real-world, measurable health outcomes for individuals and populations. Moreover, the delivery of health information and services is no longer tied to traditional brick and mortar hospitals and clinics: it has increasingly become "mobile," enabled by apps, sensors, wearables. Simultaneously, it has been augmented and often revolutionized by emerging digital and information technologies, as well as by the data that these technologies generate. This multifactorial transformation presents opportunities for innovation across the entire cycle of care, from wellness, to acute and chronic diseases, to care at the end of life. But how does one approach innovation in digital health to address these health care challenges while ensuring the greatest chance of success? At Stanford Biodesign, we believe that innovation is a process that can be learned, practiced, and perfected; and, it starts with an unmet need. In Biodesign for Digital Health, students will learn about digital health and the Biodesign needs-driven innovation process from over 50 industry experts. Over the course of 10weeks, these speakers will join the teaching team in a dynamic classroom environment that includes lectures, panel discussions, and breakout sessions. These experts represent startups, corporations, venture capital firms, accelerators, research labs, healthcare providers, and more. Student teams will take actual digital and mobile health challenges and learn how to apply Biodesign innovation principles to research and evaluate needs, ideate solutions, and objectively assess them against key criteria for satisfying the needs. Teams take a hands-on approach with the support of need coaches and other mentors. On the final day of class, teams present to a panel of digital health experts and compete for project extension funding. Friday section will be used for team projects and for scheduled workshops. Limited enrollment for this course. Students should submit their application online via: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3mxsMA5Z18QSDgW
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3

BIOE 374A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (ME 368A, MED 272A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and int more »
In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are required to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

BIOE 374B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (ME 368B, MED 272B)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and int more »
In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are required to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

BIOE 376: Startup Garage: Design

A hands-on, project-based course, in which teams identify and work with users, domain experts, and industry participants to identify an unmet customer need, design new products or services that meet that need, and develop business models to support the creation and launch of startup products or services. This course integrates methods from human-centered design, lean startup, and business model planning. Each team will conceive, design, build, and field-test critical aspects of both the product or service and the business model.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

BIOE 377: Startup Garage: Testing and Launch

STRAMGT 356/ BIOE 376 teams that concluded at the end of fall quarter that their preliminary product or service and business model suggest a path to viability, may continue with STRAMGT 366/ BIOE 377 in winter quarter. Teams develop more elaborate versions of their product/service and business model, perform a series of experiments to test key hypotheses about their product and business model, and prepare and present an investor pitch for a seed round of financing to a panel of seasoned investors and entrepreneurs.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

BIOHOPK 323H: Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 182H, EARTHSYS 323, ESS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major.
Terms: Spr | Units: 16

BIOS 289: Preparation & Practice: Finance of Biotechnology

Tailored lectures and case studies lead to a practical final project. Leaders from local firms and companies will help you gain insight into the biotechnology industry, the skills and experiences necessary to succeed, and the various roles and responsibilities within the industry. Coursework is divided into 4 sections: Introductory Material: The first segment consists of two lectures and introduces the biotechnology company life cycle along with introductory concepts in finance. Venture Capital and Private Equity: The second segment consists of three lectures devoted to venture capital finance and private equity where students will learn the basic mechanics of raising capital. nPublic Finance: The third segment consists of the interpretation of financial statements, construction of company forecasts, and evaluating business value from such projections. Final Project: The final lecture will conclude with student presentations on their final projects.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Eberle, S. (PI)

BIOS 290: Preparation & Practice: Law

Through tailored lecture, case study and a practical final project, Biosciences and interdisciplinary sciences students and trainees will learn how to apply the skills they acquired in their academic training to a career in Patent Prosecution and related fields. Taught by field and faculty experts, this is your opportunity to network with IP law representatives and to gain hands-on experience in a new career of choice option. Topics include: applying for positions, the importance of IP protection, licensing, overview of the patent process, drafting applications and litigation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Eberle, S. (PI)

BIOS 291: Preparation & Practice: Management Consulting

This course is designed for students who are interested in learning about consulting including tools and techniques to gain a consulting mindset. The course requires students to complete short assignments, participate in classroom discussions, and a team project. Students will have the opportunity to understand the consulting process right from sourcing and starting engagements to closure and follow up engagements. Further, with the help of some practical execution in the classroom, students will also learn how to manage client needs and situations, articulating client needs in a succinct proposal, planning and executing consulting assignments, managing client interactions and in the process, learn to leverage some common frameworks for consulting.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Eberle, S. (PI)
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