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1 - 10 of 67 results for: VPGE::Communication

BIOS 200: Foundations in Experimental Biology

This course is divided into two 3-week cycles. During the first cycle, students will be developing a 2-page original research proposal, which may be used for NSF or other fellowship applications. In the second cycle, students will work in small teams and will be mentored by faculty to develop an original research project for oral presentation. Skills emphasized include: 1) reading for breadth and depth; 2) developing compelling, creative arguments; 3) communicating with the spoken and written word; 4) working in teams. Important features of the course include peer assessment, interactive joint classes, and substantial face-to-face discussion with faculty drawn from across the Biosciences programs. Shortened autumn quarter class; class meets during weeks 1 through 8 of the quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

BIOS 242: Writing Compelling Fellowships and Career Development Awards

An overview of principles and fundamentals for writing competitive fellowships (e.g. NIH F31, F32) and career development awards (e.g. NIH K Awards). Topics include: developing specific aims and career development plans; using the review criteria to inform writing; timelines and resources. Participants develop proposals through guided exercises with an emphasis on in-class peer review and focused faculty feedback.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Botham, C. (PI)

BIOS 263: Applied Grant-Writing Skills for Fellowships

Graduate students in the Biosciences PhD Programs develop a fellowship proposal (e.g. NIH F31) focusing on required documents: 1-page specific aims as well as research and career development plans. Students establish a writing practice and learn fundamental grant writing skills through guided exercises, including in-class review and focused faculty feedback.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit

BIOS 271: Writing Graduate Research Fellowships

Initial sessions focus on the basics of grantsmanship, review criteria (i.e. intellectual merit and broader impact), and required materials, with particular focus on the National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP). Students draft a 2-page research proposal and 3-page personal, relevant background and future goals statement. During small group peer review sessions, students receive detailed feedback to improve the clarity of their writing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

BIOS 279: Applied Grant-Writing Skills for Science and Engineering Students

Participants develop proposals in the non-medical fields of science and engineering (e.g. for the National Science Foundation) focusing on required documents such as the 1-page Project Summary, Broader Impacts, Intellectual Merit, and Research Plan. Students establish a writing practice and learn fundamental grant writing skills through guided exercises, including in-class review and focused faculty feedback.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit

BIOS 292: Preparation & Practice: Science Communication & Media

Through tailored lecture, case study, and a practical final project, academic and professional leaders will help you gain insight into the science communications and media industry. This course assists students in developing the communication skills necessary for post-training and internship success in a science communications/media field and it provides an understanding of the scope of career opportunities within the science communications sector, focusing on the development, organization, and management issues specific to it. Through connections with alumni, faculty, and other practitioners from a variety of fields and organizations, as well as hands-on experience with the techniques and methodologies most useful on the job market, students will define their own professional goals, increase their awareness of industry terminology and theories, and hone expertise in the areas of: publishing, editing, workflow, ethics, trends, principles of effective scholarly/news writing, interviewing techniques, and media/website management.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1

CEE 377: Research Proposal Writing in Environmental Engineering and Science

For first- and second-year post-master's students preparing for thesis defense. Students develop progress reports and agency-style research proposals, and present a proposal in oral form. Prerequisite: consent of thesis adviser.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3

COMM 177D: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Narrative Journalism (COMM 277D)

(Graduate students register for COMM 277D.) How to report, write, edit, and read long-form narrative nonfiction, whether for magazines, news sites or online venues. Tools and templates of story telling such as scenes, characters, dialogue, and narrative arc. How the best long-form narrative stories defy or subvert conventional wisdom and bring fresh light to the human experience through reporting, writing, and moral passion. Prerequisite: 104 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Brenner, R. (PI)

COMM 208: Media Processes and Effects (COMM 108)

(Graduate students register for COMM 208.) The process of communication theory construction including a survey of social science paradigms and major theories of communication. Recommended: 1 or PSYCH 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Harari, G. (PI)

COMM 277C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism (COMM 177C, EARTHSYS 177C, EARTHSYS 277C)

Practical, collaborative, writing-intensive advanced journalistic reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of health and science journalism. Science and journalism students learn how to identify and write engaging stories about medicine, global health, science, and related environmental issues; how to assess the quality and relevance of science news; how to cover the health and science beats effectively and efficiently; and how to build bridges between the worlds of journalism and science. Instructed Winter Quarter 2019 by Dr. Seema Yasmin,  http://www.seemayasmin.com. nnnLimited enrollment: preference to students enrolled in or considering the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program and the Graduate Journalism Program. Prerequisite:  EarthSys 191/291,  COMM 104w, or consent of instructor. Admission by application only, available from seema@yasminacademy.com . (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Hayden, T. (PI)
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