2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 24 results for: VPGE::Career ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CEE 227: Global Project Finance

Public and private sources of finance for large, complex, capital-intensive projects in developed and developing countries. Benefits and disadvantages, major participants, risk sharing, and challenges of project finance in emerging markets. Financial, economic, political, cultural, and technological elements that affect project structures, processes, and outcomes. Case studies. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 275K: The Practice of Environmental Consulting

Class consists of eight interactive two-hour seminars with discussions, and will cover the evolution of the environmental consulting business, strategic choices and alternative business models for private and public firms, a review of the key operational issues in managing firm, organizational strategies, knowledge management and innovation, and ethical issues in providing professional services. Case studies will be used to illustrate key concepts. Selected reading materials drawn from the technical and business literature on the consulting business. Student groups will prepare and present an abbreviated business plan for an environmental based business. Enrollment limited to CEE MS and PHD students.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DLCL 303: Language Program Management

Administrative Internship in Language Program Management. Experiences can include, but are not limited to, the following: Shadow faculty and staff in select areas of administration and supervision within the Language Center and DLCL; Placement testing and student advisement; Technology in teaching and learning; Processes for teacher observation and feedback; Procedures in staff supervision and Human Resources; Course scheduling, budgeting, staffing, and searches; Interface with external programs (e.g. BOSP, Bechtel, CTL).
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DLCL 311: Professional Workshop

Meets regularly throughout the year to discuss issues in the professional study of literature. Topics include the academic job market and the challenges of research and teaching at different types of institutions. Supervised by the graduate affairs committee of the DLCL. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 202I: International Education Policy Workshop (EDUC 102I)

This is a project-based workshop. Practical introduction to issues in educational policy making, education reform, educational planning, implementation of policy interventions, and monitoring and evaluation in developing country contexts. Preference to students enrolled in ICE/IEAPA, but open to other students interested in international development or comparative public policy with instructor's consent. Attendance at first class required for enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kijima, R. (PI)

EDUC 334A: Youth and Education Law Project: Clinical Practice

(Same as LAW 660A). The Youth and Education Law Project offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or policy research and advocacy. All students have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with community groups in advocating for the provision of better and more equitable educational opportunities to their children. In addition, the clinic may pursue a specific policy research and advocacy project that will result in a written policy brief and policy proposal. Students working on special education matters have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area interview and co more »
(Same as LAW 660A). The Youth and Education Law Project offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or policy research and advocacy. All students have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with community groups in advocating for the provision of better and more equitable educational opportunities to their children. In addition, the clinic may pursue a specific policy research and advocacy project that will result in a written policy brief and policy proposal. Students working on special education matters have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational research, create case plans, and represent clients at individual education program (IEP) team meetings, mediation or special education due process hearings. This work offers students a chance to study the relationship between individual special education advocacy and system-wide reform efforts such as impact litigation. Students working on school discipline matters interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, interview witnesses, conduct legal and educational research, create case plan, and represent clients at school discipline hearings such as expulsion hearings. Such hearings provide the opportunity to present oral and written argument, examine witnesses, and present evidence before a hearing officer. If appropriate and necessary, such proceedings also present the opportunity to represent students on appeal before the school district board of trustees or the county board of education. The education clinic includes two or three mandatory training sessions to be held at the beginning of the term, a weekly seminar that focuses on legal skills and issues in law and education policy, regular case review, and a one hour weekly meeting with the clinic instructor. Admission is by consent of instructor. Beginning with the 2009-2010 academic year, each of the Law School's clinical courses is being offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Koski, W. (PI)

EDUC 377C: Philanthropy: Strategy, Innovation and Social Change

You have extraordinary potential to create social change, and Philanthropy: Strategy, Innovation and Social Change will empower you with the skills, experience and inspiration to actualize that potential. Regardless of your profession, industry, background, age, resource form or amount, this course will amplify your ability to make your giving, volunteering, service and leadership matter more. Through deep introspection you will develop your individual social change strategy and define and/or refine your social passions and philanthropic purpose. You will develop and apply skills essential to effective philanthropy, including creating a mission statement, mapping a social issue ecosystem, developing a philanthropic strategy and mitigating risk. You will create a theory of change that maps how you will transform your values and resources (including intellectual, human, network and financial capital) into measurable social change. You will also create a logic model, assess nonprofits and more »
You have extraordinary potential to create social change, and Philanthropy: Strategy, Innovation and Social Change will empower you with the skills, experience and inspiration to actualize that potential. Regardless of your profession, industry, background, age, resource form or amount, this course will amplify your ability to make your giving, volunteering, service and leadership matter more. Through deep introspection you will develop your individual social change strategy and define and/or refine your social passions and philanthropic purpose. You will develop and apply skills essential to effective philanthropy, including creating a mission statement, mapping a social issue ecosystem, developing a philanthropic strategy and mitigating risk. You will create a theory of change that maps how you will transform your values and resources (including intellectual, human, network and financial capital) into measurable social change. You will also create a logic model, assess nonprofits and grant proposals, evaluate nonprofit programs and social change initiatives and develop strategies to share learning and increase impact. Case studies will illuminate diverse philanthropic models and approaches¿private foundations, corporate giving vehicles, venture philanthropy and LLCs, as well as policy change, advocacy and impact investing. Class activities will include role-plays, debates and simulations such as creating personal giving strategies, exploring the power dynamics of grantor-grantee relationships, giving funding pitches and assessing foundation grant proposals. Each student will select and evaluate a local nonprofit and create a formal grant proposal. Students will peer-review grant proposals, participate in a multi-stage grantmaking process and allocate $20,000 of grants funded by The Learning by Giving Foundation and Andreessen Philanthropies. Students will also have the unique opportunity to directly connect and engage with globally renowned philanthropic leaders, including Laura Muñoz Arnold (Arnold Foundation), Dr. Priscilla Chan (Chan Zuckerberg Initiative), Dr. Sandra Hernández (California Health Care Foundation), Laurene Powell Jobs (Emerson Collective), Dr. Alex Karp (Palantir), Dr. Judith Rodin (Rockefeller Foundation) and Darren Walker (Ford Foundation), among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 386: Leadership and Administration in Higher Education

Definitions of leadership and leadership roles within colleges and universities. Leadership models and organizational concepts. Case study analysis of the problems and challenges facing today's higher education administrators.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Calvert, J. (PI)

EFSLANG 694: English for Business, Industry and Professional Life

For advanced graduate students. Task-based practice of language appropriate for professional settings in industry and related teamwork. Simulation of the roles of manager, applicant, subordinate, and coworker. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 693A, or consent of instructor. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Rylance, C. (PI)

ENGR 311A: Women's Perspectives

Master's and Ph.D. seminar series driven by student interests. Possible topics: time management, career choices, health and family, diversity, professional development, and personal values. Guest speakers from academia and industry, student presentations with an emphasis on group discussion. Graduate students share experiences and examine scientific research in these areas. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Sheppard, S. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints