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191 - 200 of 211 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

PHYSICS 294: Teaching of Physics Seminar

Weekly seminar/discussions on interactive techniques for teaching physics. Practicum which includes class observations, grading and student teaching in current courses. Required of all Teaching Assistants prior to first teaching assignment. Mandatory attendance at weekly in-class sessions during first 5 weeks of the quarter; mandatory successful completion of all practicum activities. Enrollment by permission. To get a permission number please complete form: http://web.stanford.edu/dept/physics/academics/TA/PH294app.fb If you have not heard from us by the beginning of class, please come to the first class session.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Nanavati, C. (PI)

PHYSICS 295: Learning & Teaching of Science (EDUC 280, ENGR 295)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Wieman, C. (PI)

PSYCH 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

PUBLPOL 306: Writing and Rhetoric for Policy Audiences

This course offers hands-on learning of effective writing and presentation techniques for audiences that include policy makers, decision stakeholders, interest groups, the media, and the public. Class time will be spent learning lessons in rhetoric, analyzing multiple written genres (memo, op-ed, report, media communications), participating in peer review, and practicing presentation strategies (elevator pitch, press conference, media interview, board meeting, formal presentation). Course texts include sample memos, op-eds, and white papers, as well as rhetoric handouts and videos. Students will draft, revise, and submit writing for policy audiences in the compilation of a final portfolio. Students will also produce oral and multimedia arguments, individually and in teams. Students will be responsible for timely peer review and short presentations on course materials. Enrollment limited. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Peterson, J. (PI)

SOC 300: Workshop: The Art and Joy of Teaching

Note: for first-year Sociology Doctoral Students only.nThis class will prepare you for the important roles as undergraduate instructors at Stanford. It rests on the idea that teaching is not only an art that we can all learn, continually improve, and cultivate; teaching can also become a source of great joy and personal meaning during your graduate career, and beyond. You will not only learn how to become an effective instructor in your day-to-day teaching roles (e.g., how to write a compelling syllabus, deliver a powerful lecture, lead an engaging discussion section, build an inclusive classroom, juggle with teaching logistics, make best use of technology, campus resources etc.); you will also discover that teaching is - above all a deeply personal process. While your students will all have different backgrounds, stories and learning styles, we, too, all have different philosophies and ways of teaching. Throughout this class, we will help each other explore what these might be, how we can develop and cultivate them, and, finally, how we can actively employ them to foster learning environments that allow for both academic, as well as personal growth. It is my hope that, at the end of this class, you will embark on your very own educational journeys as teacher-learners who unlock the many great potentials that reside not only in your students, but also in you: plus est en vous! There is more in you (than you think!) With this in mind and the right tools in our hands, we can begin to positively transform our students, while allowing ourselves to be transformed by them at the very same time: this is the art and joy of teaching.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Hahn, M. (PI)

SOMGEN 275: Leading Value Improvement in Health Care Delivery

Successful leaders on the journey to better care delivery methods with lower total spending inevitably face pivotal crises. What confluence of attitude, strategy, and events allows them to prevail? Contexts will include entrepreneurship and early stage investing, spread of higher value care delivery innovations, health care delivery system management, and private and public policy making to reward value. Guest faculty will include nationally recognized leaders and change agents, who will invite students to recommend alternative approaches to managing pivotal challenges. The course is open to any member of the Stanford community aspiring to lead higher value in health care delivery including graduate students, undergraduates, and postdoctoral candidates, as well as medical center residents and clinical fellows. May be repeated for credit
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

SOMGEN 282: The Startup Garage: Design (CHEMENG 482)

(Same as STRAMGT 356) The Startup Garage is an experiential lab course that focuses on the design, testing and launch of a new venture. Multidisciplinary student teams work through an iterative process of understanding user needs, creating a point of view statement, ideating and prototyping new product and services and their business models, and communicating the user need, product, service and business models to end-users, partners, and investors. In the autumn quarter, teams will: identify and validate a compelling user need and develop very preliminary prototypes for a new product or service and business models. Students form teams, conduct field work and iterate on the combination of business model -- product -- market. Teams will present their first prototypes (business model - product - market) at the end of the quarter to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

SOMGEN 284: The Startup Garage: Testing and Launch (CHEMENG 484)

This is the second quarter of the two-quarter series. In this quarter, student teams expand the field work they started in the fall quarter. They get out of the building to talk to potential customers, partners, distributors, and investors to test and refine their business model, product/service and market. This quarter the teams will be expected to develop and test a minimally viable product, iterate, and focus on validated lessons on: the market opportunity, user need and behavior, user interactions with the product or service, business unit economics, sale and distribution models, partnerships, value proposition, and funding strategies. Teams will interact with customers, partners, distributors, investors and mentors with the end goal of developing and delivering a funding pitch to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

STRAMGT 356: The Startup Garage: Design

Startup Garage is an intensive hands-on, project-based course, in which students will apply the concepts of design thinking, engineering, finance, business and organizational skills to design and test new business concepts that address real world needs . Our aspiration is to help teams identify an unmet customer need, design new products or services that meet that need, and develop business models to support the creation and launch of startup products or services. Even those teams that do not successfully launch a venture, or individuals who decide not to move forward, will learn critical, cutting-edge techniques about starting and launching a venture. Collaborative, multi-disciplinary teams will identify and work with users, domain experts, and industry participants to identify and deeply understand customer needs, then proceed to design products or services and a business model to address those needs. Each team will conceive, design, build, and field-test critical aspects of both the product or service and the business model. This course is offered by the Graduate School of Business. It integrates methods from human-centered design, lean startup, and business model planning. The course focuses on developing entrepreneurial skills (using short lectures and in-class exercises) and then applying these skills to specific problems faced by those users identified by the teams. Teams will get out of the building and interact directly with users and advisers to develop a deep understanding of the challenges they face and to field test their proposed services, products, and business models.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

TAPS 277: Dramatic Writing: The Fundamentals (CSRE 177, FEMGEN 177, TAPS 177)

Course introduces students to the basic elements of playwriting and creative experimentation for the stage. Topics include: character development, conflict and plot construction, staging and setting, and play structure. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Marsha Norman, Patrick Shanley, August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks, Paula Vogel, Octavio Solis and others. Table readings of one-act length work required by quarter's end.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Moraga, C. (PI)
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