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51 - 60 of 285 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

COMM 361: Law of Democracy (POLISCI 327C)

Combined with LAW 7036 (formerly Law 577). This course is intended to give students a basic understanding of the themes in the legal regulation of elections and politics. We will cover all the major Supreme Court cases on topics of voting rights, reapportionment/redistricting, ballot access, regulation of political parties, campaign finance, and the 2000 presidential election controversy. The course pays particular attention to competing political philosophies and empirical assumptions that underlie the Court's reasoning while still focusing on the cases as litigation tools used to serve political ends. Elements used in grading: Class participation and one day take home final exam. ( POLISCI 327C; LAW 577)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Persily, N. (PI)

CS 298: Seminar on Teaching Introductory Computer Science (EDUC 298)

Faculty, undergraduates, and graduate students interested in teaching discuss topics raised by teaching computer science at the introductory level. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Gregg, C. (PI)

CS 377E: Designing Solutions to Global Grand Challenges

In this course we creatively apply information technologies to collectively attack Global Grand Challenges (e.g., global warming, rising healthcare costs and declining access, and ensuring quality education for all). Interdisciplinary student teams will carry out need-finding within a target domain, followed by brainstorming to propose a quarter long project. Teams will spend the rest of the quarter applying user-centered design methods to rapidly iterate through design, prototyping, and testing of their solutions. This course will interweave a weekly lecture with a weekly studio session where students apply the techniques hands-on in a small-scale, supportive environment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

CSRE 1A: My Journey: Conversations on Race and Ethnicity

This course meets once a week for one hour, over lunch (provided). Students will meet with CSRE faculty who will share their work, their life stories, their reasons for believing that race and ethnicity are of central concern to all members of our society. Diverse fields will be represented: sociology, history, literature, psychology and others.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Wilcox, M. (PI)

CSRE 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, EDUC 245, PSYCH 245A)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials. Students will work with community partners to better understand the nuances of racial and ethnic identity development in different contexts. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

CSRE 291: Urban Schools, Social Policy, and the Gentrifying City (EDUC 390, URBANST 141A)

This course is designed to help students develop a more sophisticated understanding of educational inequality in the contemporary U.S. city. This course will survey existing literature about the intersection of gentrification and urban schooling, focusing on policies and practices that gave rise to the current urban condition, theory and research about urban redevelopment, collateral consequences for schools and communities, and how these issues relate to the structure and governance of urban schools as well as to the geography of opportunity more broadly.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: pearman, f. (PI)

CSRE 292: Education for Liberation: A History of African American Education, 1800 to the Present (EDUC 392)

This course examines discourses around education and freedom in African American educational thought from the 19th century to the present, using both primary sources and the works of current historians. The course pays particular attention to how the educational philosophies of different African American thinkers reflected their conceptions of what shape freedom might take in the American context, and the tension between educational outlooks that sought inclusion or integration versus those that prized self-determination. We will also be attentive to the ways in which age, gender, geography, class, and color worked to influence the pursuit and achievement of various African American educational visions. This will be a 3-5 credit course and meet as a seminar open both to graduate students and advanced undergraduates.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Hines, M. (PI)

CSRE 350G: Performing Race, Gender, and Sexuality (ARTSINST 150G, CSRE 150G, FEMGEN 150G, LIFE 150G, TAPS 150G)

In this theory and practice-based course, students will examine performances by and scholarly texts about artists who critically and mindfully engage race, gender, and sexuality. Students will cultivate their skills as artist-scholars through written assignments and the creation of performances in response to the assigned material. Attendance and written reflection about a live performance event on campus are required. Students will also learn various meditation practices as tools for making and critiquing performance, in both our seminar discussions and performance workshops. We will approach mindfulness as method and theory in our own practice, as well as in relation to the works studied. We will also consider the ethics and current debates concerning the mindfulness industry. Examples of artists studied include James Luna, Nao Bustamante, Renee Cox, William Pope.L, Cassils, boychild, Curious, Adrian Piper, Xandra Ibarra, Valérie Reding, Guillermo Gomez-Peña, and Ana Mendieta.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Otalvaro, G. (PI)

CSRE 363: Race in Greco-Roman Antiquity (CLASSICS 363)

This course will investigate representations of black people in ancient Greek and Roman antiquity. In addition to interrogating the conflation of the terms "race" and "blackness" as it applies to this time period, students will learn how to critique the interference of racial ideologies in modern scholarship, and they will cross-examine the role that race and cultural imperialism have played in the formation of the current discipline of Classics. Students will be invited to incorporate materials that they deem crucial into this discussion of skin color in Greco-Roman antiquity. Therefore, this course will benefit greatly from those with a broad spectrum of interests related to this topic.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Derbew, S. (PI)

CSRE 364A: Race and Performance (AFRICAAM 164A, CSRE 164A, TAPS 164)

How does race function in performance and dare we say ¿live and in living color?¿ How does one deconstruct discrimination at its roots?n nFrom a perspective of global solidarity and recognition of shared plight among BIPOC communities, we will read and perform plays that represent material and psychological conditions under a common supremacist regime. Where and when possible, we will host a member of the creative team of some plays in our class for a live discussion. Assigned materials include works by Lin-Manuel Miranda, Amiri Baraka, Young Jean Lee, Ayad Akhtar, Susan Lori Parks, David Henry Hwang, Betty Shamieh, Jeremy O. Harris, and Christopher Demos Brown.n nThis class offers undergraduate students a discussion that does not center whiteness, but takes power, history, culture, philosophy, and hierarchy as core points of debate. In the first two weeks, we will establish the common terms of the discussion about stereotypes, representation, and historical claims, but then we will qu more »
How does race function in performance and dare we say ¿live and in living color?¿ How does one deconstruct discrimination at its roots?n nFrom a perspective of global solidarity and recognition of shared plight among BIPOC communities, we will read and perform plays that represent material and psychological conditions under a common supremacist regime. Where and when possible, we will host a member of the creative team of some plays in our class for a live discussion. Assigned materials include works by Lin-Manuel Miranda, Amiri Baraka, Young Jean Lee, Ayad Akhtar, Susan Lori Parks, David Henry Hwang, Betty Shamieh, Jeremy O. Harris, and Christopher Demos Brown.n nThis class offers undergraduate students a discussion that does not center whiteness, but takes power, history, culture, philosophy, and hierarchy as core points of debate. In the first two weeks, we will establish the common terms of the discussion about stereotypes, representation, and historical claims, but then we will quickly move toward an advanced conversation about effective discourse and activism through art, performance, and cultural production. In this class, we assume that colonialism, slavery, white supremacy, and oppressive contemporary state apparatuses are real, undeniable, and manifest. Since our starting point is clear, our central question is not about recognizing or delineating the issues, but rather, it is a debate about how to identify the target of our criticism in order to counter oppression effectively and dismantle long-standing structures.n nNot all BIPOC communities are represented in this syllabus, as such claim of inclusion in a single quarter would be tokenistic and disingenuous. Instead, we will aspire to understand and negotiate some of the complexities related to race in several communities locally in the U.S. and beyond.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
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