2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
See Stanford's HealthAlerts website for latest updates concerning COVID-19 and academic policies.

41 - 50 of 285 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

COMM 220: The Rise of Digital Culture (AMSTUD 120, COMM 120W)

From Snapchat to artificial intelligence, digital systems are reshaping our jobs, our democracies, our love lives, and even what it means to be human. But where did these media come from? And what kind of culture are they creating? To answer these questions, this course explores the entwined development of digital technologies and post-industrial ways of living and working from the Cold War to the present. Topics will include the historical origins of digital media, cultural contexts of their deployment and use, and the influence of digital media on conceptions of self, community, and state. Priority to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

COMM 224: Truth, Trust, and Tech (COMM 124)

Deception is one of the most significant and pervasive social phenomena of our age. Lies range from the trivial to the very serious, including deception between friends and family, in the workplace, and in security and intelligence contexts. At the same time, information and communication technologies have pervaded almost all aspects of human communication, from everyday technologies that support interpersonal interactions to, such as email and instant messaging, to more sophisticated systems that support organization-level interactions. Given the prevalence of both deception and communication technology in our personal and professional lives, an important set of questions have recently emerged about how humans adapt their deceptive practices to new communication and information technologies, including how communication technology affects the practice of lying and the detection of deception, and whether technology can be used to identify deception.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

COMM 248: Conversations on Journalism, Identity, and Social Justice (COMM 148)

In this one-credit seminar, students will learn from U.S. journalists who are on the front lines of covering social justice and identity at a pivotal time in American history. The speakers will include JSK Community Impact Fellows, diverse journalists who are working to address information gaps in their communities, especially underserved communities of color. Students will be active participants in the conversations and express their thoughts in written reflections. Instructors will be Michael Bolden, R.B. Brenner, and Dawn Garcia.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

COMM 258: Censorship and Propaganda (COMM 158)

While the internet and other digital technologies have amplified the voice of ordinary citizens, the power of governments and other large organizations to control and to manipulate information is increasingly apparent. In this course, we will examine censorship and propaganda in the age of the internet and social media. What constitutes censorship and propaganda in the digital age? Who conducts censorship and propaganda, and how? What are the consequences and effects of censorship and propaganda in this era of information proliferation? How have censorship and propaganda changed from previous eras? Students will take a hands-on, project-based approach to exploring these questions.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

COMM 277C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism (COMM 177C, EARTHSYS 177C, EARTHSYS 277C)

Practical, collaborative, writing-intensive advanced journalistic reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of health and science journalism. Science and journalism students learn how to identify and write engaging stories about medicine, global health, science, and related environmental issues; how to assess the quality and relevance of science news; how to cover the health and science beats effectively and efficiently; and how to build bridges between the worlds of journalism and science. Instructed Winter Quarter 2019 by Dr. Seema Yasmin,  http://www.seemayasmin.com. nnnLimited enrollment: preference to students enrolled in or considering the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program and the Graduate Journalism Program. Prerequisite:  EarthSys 191/291,  COMM 104w, or consent of instructor. Admission by application only, available from dr.yasmin@stanford.edu (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4

COMM 284: Race and Media (COMM 184)

This course explores the co-construction of media practices and racial identity in the US. We will ask how media have shaped how we think about race. And we will explore the often surprising ways ideas about race have shaped media practices and technologies in turn. The course will draw on contemporary debates as well as historical examples and will cover themes such as representation and visual culture, media industries and audience practices, and racial bias in digital technology.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

COMM 286: Media, Technology, and the Body (COMM 186W)

This course considers major themes in the cultural analysis of the body in relation to media technologies. How do media and information technologies shape our understanding of the body and concepts of bodily difference such as race, gender, and disability? We will explore both classic theories and recent scholarship to examine how technologies mediate the body and bodily practices in various domains, from entertainment to engineering, politics to product design.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

COMM 301: Communication Research, Curriculum Development and Pedagogy

Designed to prepare students for teaching and research in the Department of Communication. Students will be trained in developing curriculum and in pedagogical practices, and will also be exposed to the research programs of various faculty members in the department. Required of all Ph.D. students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

COMM 318: Quantitative Social Science Research Methods

An introduction to a broad range of social science research methods that are widely used in PhD work. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5
Instructors: Krosnick, J. (PI)

COMM 339: Questionnaire Design for Surveys and Laboratory Experiments: Social and Cognitive Perspectives (POLISCI 421K, PSYCH 231)

The social and psychological processes involved in asking and answering questions via questionnaires for the social sciences; optimizing questionnaire design; open versus closed questions; rating versus ranking; rating scale length and point labeling; acquiescence response bias; don't-know response options; response choice order effects; question order effects; social desirability response bias; attitude and behavior recall; and introspective accounts of the causes of thoughts and actions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Krosnick, J. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints