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31 - 40 of 189 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CHEMENG 484: The Startup Garage: Testing and Launch (SOMGEN 284)

This is the second quarter of the two-quarter series. In this quarter, student teams expand the field work they started in the fall quarter. They get out of the building to talk to potential customers, partners, distributors, and investors to test and refine their business model, product/service and market. This quarter the teams will be expected to develop and test a minimally viable product, iterate, and focus on validated lessons on: the market opportunity, user need and behavior, user interactions with the product or service, business unit economics, sale and distribution models, partnerships, value proposition, and funding strategies. Teams will interact with customers, partners, distributors, investors and mentors with the end goal of developing and delivering a funding pitch to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

COMM 208: Media Processes and Effects (COMM 108)

(Graduate students register for COMM 208.) The process of communication theory construction including a survey of social science paradigms and major theories of communication. Recommended: 1 or PSYCH 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Harari, G. (PI)

COMM 277C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism (COMM 177C, EARTHSYS 177C, EARTHSYS 277C)

Practical, collaborative, writing-intensive advanced journalistic reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of health and science journalism. Science and journalism students learn how to identify and write engaging stories about medicine, global health, science, and related environmental issues; how to assess the quality and relevance of science news; how to cover the health and science beats effectively and efficiently; and how to build bridges between the worlds of journalism and science. Instructed Winter Quarter 2019 by Dr. Seema Yasmin,  http://www.seemayasmin.com. nnnLimited enrollment: preference to students enrolled in or considering the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program and the Graduate Journalism Program. Prerequisite:  EarthSys 191/291,  COMM 104w, or consent of instructor. Admission by application only, available from seema@yasminacademy.com . (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hayden, T. (PI)

COMM 301: Communication Research, Curriculum Development and Pedagogy

Designed to prepare students for teaching and research in the Department of Communication. Students will be trained in developing curriculum and in pedagogical practices, and will also be exposed to the research programs of various faculty members in the department. Required of all Ph.D. students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMM 318: Quantitative Social Science Research Methods

An introduction to a broad range of social science research methods that are widely used in PhD work. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Krosnick, J. (PI)

COMM 339: Questionnaire Design for Surveys and Laboratory Experiments: Social and Cognitive Perspectives (POLISCI 421K, PSYCH 231)

The social and psychological processes involved in asking and answering questions via questionnaires for the social sciences; optimizing questionnaire design; open versus closed questions; rating versus ranking; rating scale length and point labeling; acquiescence response bias; don't-know response options; response choice order effects; question order effects; social desirability response bias; attitude and behavior recall; and introspective accounts of the causes of thoughts and actions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Krosnick, J. (PI)

CS 298: Seminar on Teaching Introductory Computer Science (EDUC 298)

Faculty, undergraduates, and graduate students interested in teaching discuss topics raised by teaching computer science at the introductory level. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Gregg, C. (PI)

DESINST 215: The Design of Data

Our world is increasingly complex and laden with many forms of measurable data. Infographics abound, but whether explicit or not, the stories they tell are all designed. In this hyper-concentrated, hands-on course, students will learn to use mapping and design techniques to sort and synthesize data, unlock insights and communicate information. We will create four different types of maps and infographics and students will practice finding insight from both qualitative and quantitative information. Take this course if you are interested in learning how to navigate through and create for the complicated intersection of data and design.nnAdmission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classesn for more information.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DESINST 270: Visual Design Fundamentals

Introduction to the principles, tools, and techniques of visual design and visual communication. Students learn the fundamentals of line, shape, color, composition, and type and use these basic building blocks to communicate with clarity, emotion, and meaning. Four successive design projects introduce new principles and techniques each week. Projects focus on the digital realm of mobile phones, tablets, websites, and other screen-based interfaces. Students get hands-on experience with both vector and bitmap software packages. No prior experience required. Accepting 24 students. Graduate and undergraduate students encouraged to apply. Attendance at all sessions is mandatory. Application required, see dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DESINST 310: Negotiation by Design: Applied Design Thinking for Negotiators

AN APPLICATION IS REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE. PLEASE SUBMIT IT AND WAIT FOR THE ACCEPTANCE NOTICE BEFORE ENROLLING ON AXESS. See https://dschool.stanford.edu/classes/negotiation-by-design for more information. nnWhere many stakeholders are working within a complex scenario, the skilled negotiator is comfortable with the inherent ambiguity, at once nimble and careful in responding to new information and changing positions. In this advanced negotiation course, we will crack open some of the fundamental negotiation principles and show you how, where and why design thinking can add unique value to your negotiation skills and outcomes. Mapping and designing the structure and process of your negotiation; understanding tools to gain empathy for the stakeholders involved in the negotiation; learning different styles of negotiation; practicing spontaneity, adaptability and presence in the moment; team brainstorming in preparation, and team dynamics in the execution of a negotiation. You will work through exercises that isolate these skills and then apply them in simulated negotiations, at least one in every class session, to improve your confidence and competence as a negotiator. You and your teammates will then bring them all to bear in a capstone, multi-party, multi-issue negotiation simulation. If you have already taken a basic negotiation course, or have demonstrable experience, we invite you to apply. No previous design thinking experience is required, though certainly useful.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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