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251 - 260 of 287 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

SOC 268: Global Organizations: The Matrix of Change (PUBLPOL 168, PUBLPOL 268, SOC 168)

We learn how to apply analytical tools from the social sciences to organizations, and study how to design effective organizations and projects within and across institutional settings. A variety of organizations are included and how they deal with strategy changes and accountability. The theme for this year's class is on accountability of non-profit organizations such as Doctors Without Borders, The International Rescue Committee and The Red Cross. Recommended: FINANCE 377, MS&E 180, SOC 160, ECON 149, or MGTECON 330.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

SOC 280B: Introduction to Data Analysis (CSRE 180B, SOC 180B)

Preference to Sociology majors and minors. Enrollment for non-sociologists will open two weeks after winter enrollment begins. Methods for analyzing and evaluating quantitative data in sociological research. Students will be taught how to run and interpret multivariate regressions, how to test hypotheses, and how to read and critique published data analyses.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

SOC 300: Workshop: The Art and Joy of Teaching

Note: for first-year Sociology Doctoral Students only. This class will prepare you to teach Stanford students in your role as a TA or instructor. It rests on the idea that teaching is both an art to learn and cultivate, and a source of great joy and personal meaning during your graduate career and beyond. The course¿s main goal is to help you become an effective instructor in your day-to-day teaching, covering skills such as how to deliver a powerful lecture, lead an engaging discussion section, build an inclusive classroom, describe your personal pedagogy to others, juggle teaching logistics and competing demands, and make the best use of technology and campus resources. You will also discover that teaching is, above all, a deeply personal process that should take into account the different backgrounds, stories, and learning styles of both students and instructors to enable students to flourish academically and personally. Throughout this class, we will explore different philosophies more »
Note: for first-year Sociology Doctoral Students only. This class will prepare you to teach Stanford students in your role as a TA or instructor. It rests on the idea that teaching is both an art to learn and cultivate, and a source of great joy and personal meaning during your graduate career and beyond. The course¿s main goal is to help you become an effective instructor in your day-to-day teaching, covering skills such as how to deliver a powerful lecture, lead an engaging discussion section, build an inclusive classroom, describe your personal pedagogy to others, juggle teaching logistics and competing demands, and make the best use of technology and campus resources. You will also discover that teaching is, above all, a deeply personal process that should take into account the different backgrounds, stories, and learning styles of both students and instructors to enable students to flourish academically and personally. Throughout this class, we will explore different philosophies and ways of teaching so that you can cultivate and employ your own, personalized pedagogy. It is my hope that you will use this course as a springboard to embark on your own teaching journey. With a growth mindset and the right tools in our hands, we can begin to both transform and be transformed by our students: this is the art and joy of teaching.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Johnson, A. (PI)

SOMGEN 120: Compassion, Dignity and Empathy-Physician Communication Skills (SOMGEN 220)

As medical technology advances, research shows the human touch and the provider-patient interaction retains a critical role in the practice of medicine. This class uses fun and novel techniques to enhance communication skills and build empathy with others. Beyond clinical communication skills, we will learn how to be better communicators of complex medical and scientific skills with broader audiences, including the media. The class will meet with physicians who use social media to improve health literacy and with journalists who transform data into compelling stories about health and medicine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

SOMGEN 203: Literature and Writing for Military Affiliated Students

Who gets to tell a war story? Everyone who is affected by war. So everyone. This class will explore short readings of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction written by veterans or influenced by conflict. We will discuss the importance of war writing as a medium of expression for veterans, a means of understanding and reconciliation for civilians, and the ways it has impacted culture as a whole. The work will include short reading assignments, in-class writing prompts and guest speaker(s), such as General Jim Mattis, veteran writer Hugh Martin and others. There will be a final 1,500-word project.No writing experience required or expected.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable 8 times (up to 8 units total)
Instructors: Genovese, J. (PI)

SOMGEN 206: Global Medical Issues Affecting Women (FEMGEN 206)

This course discusses a number of key medical issues affecting women (and girls) around the world. Through primarily guest lectures, students will become acquainted with many critical challenges to women¿s health globally, and how these may be addressed efficiently, cost-effectively, and sustainably. The aim is to cultivate a nuanced appreciation of women¿s unique needs, roles, and challenges in the contemporary global health landscape.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2

SOMGEN 207: Theories of Change in Global Health (INTLPOL 291)

Organizations dedicated to improving global health deploy various approaches ranging from efforts to improve economic conditions, health systems, and technology to policy change and advocacy. This course critically evaluates 15 common theories of change that underlay global health interventions. Students will review and discuss examples of both success and failure of each theory of change drawn from journal articles from various disciplines. This seminar is appropriate for graduate students of any discipline who are interested in considering the range of approaches and their likely utility when considering a specific global health problem in a particular location. Upper-class undergraduates who have completed at least one of the prerequisite courses ( ECON 118, CEE 265D, HUMBIO 129S or HUMBIO 124C) and who are willing to commit the preparatory time are welcome. Sign up for 3 unit credits to participate in the seminar or 4 units to participate in the seminar and complete a project.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Luby, S. (PI)

SOMGEN 215: Biosocial Medicine: The Social, Psychological, and Biological Determinants of Behavior and Wellbeing (EDUC 205, HUMBIO 65)

Explores how social forces, psychological influences, and biological systems combine to affect human behavior in early childhood, in the educational experience, and throughout the life course. Examines how behaviors are linked to well-being. Uses a flipped classroom model, in which a series of lectures are available for students to view on-line before class. In-class time then focuses on case studies from published research. Students must enroll in HUMBIO 65 for a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Barr, D. (PI)

SOMGEN 220: Compassion, Dignity and Empathy-Physician Communication Skills (SOMGEN 120)

As medical technology advances, research shows the human touch and the provider-patient interaction retains a critical role in the practice of medicine. This class uses fun and novel techniques to enhance communication skills and build empathy with others. Beyond clinical communication skills, we will learn how to be better communicators of complex medical and scientific skills with broader audiences, including the media. The class will meet with physicians who use social media to improve health literacy and with journalists who transform data into compelling stories about health and medicine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

SOMGEN 230: Sexual Function and Diversity in Medical Disciplines (CHPR 230, FEMGEN 230)

This course is a coordinated seminar series that presents evidence-based health promotion and disease prevention guidelines by clinical and translational research and population health science faculty of clinical departments other than Medicine (the focus of CHPR 260) of the Stanford School of Medicine, including; Anesthesiology & Perioperative, & Pain Medicine, Cardiothoracic gy, Emergency Medicine, Neurology & Neurological Sciences, Neurosurgery, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Ophthalmology, Orthopaedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Radiation Oncology, Radiology, Surgery and Urology. CHPR master's program students must enroll in CHPR 230 for a letter grade and priority for enrollment will be given to current CHPR students. For third unit, graduate students attend INDE 215 Queer Health & Medicine and complete assignments for that section. For third unit and WAYs, undergrads enroll in SOMGEN 130. Prerequisites: CHPR 201 or HUMBIO 126/ CHPR 226 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3
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