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171 - 180 of 287 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ENGR 311B: Designing the Professional

Wondering how to weave together what really fits you, is doable, and will be satisfying and meaningful? Have more questions than answers? Have too many ideas for your career, or not enough? This course applies the mindsets and innovation principles of design thinking to the "wicked problem" of designing your life and vocation. Students gain awareness and empathy, define areas of life and work on which they want to work, ideate about ways to move forward, try small prototypes, and test their assumptions. The course is highly interactive. It will conclude with creation of 3 versions of the next 5 years and prototype ideas to begin making those futures a reality. The course will include brief readings, writing, reflections, and in-class exercises. Expect to practice ideation and prototyping methodologies, decision making practices and to participate in interactive activities in pairs, trios, and small groups. Seminar open to all graduate students and Postdocs in all 7 schools.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

ENGR 312: Science and Engineering Course Design (CTL 312)

For students interested in an academic career and who anticipate designing science or engineering courses at the undergraduate or graduate level. Goal is to apply research on science and engineering learning to the design of effective course materials. Topics include syllabus design, course content and format decisions, assessment planning and grading, and strategies for teaching improvement.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

ENGR 391: Engineering Education and Online Learning (EDUC 391)

A project based introduction to web-based learning design. In this course we will explore the evidence and theory behind principles of learning design and game design thinking. In addition to gaining a broad understanding of the emerging field of the science and engineering of learning, students will experiment with a variety of educational technologies, pedagogical techniques, game design principles, and assessment methods. Over the course of the quarter, interdisciplinary teams will create a prototype or a functioning piece of educational technology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Bowen, K. (PI)

ESS 204: Virtual Scientific Presentation and Public Speaking (GEOLSCI 306, GEOPHYS 205)

The ability to present your research in a compelling, concise, and engaging manner will enhance your professional career. Virtual presentations make it harder to connect and interact with the audience, and to overcome this requires new skills, including video, sound, lighting, live vs. pre-recorded content, and virtual posters. These elements will be the focus of this class. But regardless of format, I will work to convince you that the best way to capture an audience and leave a lasting impression is to tell a story, do a demo, or pick a fight. The course is taught as a series of stand-and-deliver exercises with class feedback and revision on the fly, supplemented by one-on-one coaching. We will have sessions on virtual conference presentations, virtual job interviews and job talks, departmental seminars, webinars, press interviews, and funding pitches. My pledge is that everyone will come away a more skilled and confident speaker than they were before. Grades are optional: 70% in-class exercises, 30% final project, such as your upcoming AGU, GSA, or SEG presentation. It's best to take the course when you have research to present. ( http://syllabus.stanford.edu)
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Stein, R. (PI)

FEMGEN 217: Expanding Engineering Limits: Culture, Diversity, and Equity (CSRE 117, CSRE 217, ENGR 117, ENGR 217, FEMGEN 117)

This course investigates how culture and diversity shape who becomes an engineer, what problems get solved, and the quality of designs, technology, and products. As a course community, we consider how cultural beliefs about race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, abilities, socioeconomic status, and other intersectional aspects of identity interact with beliefs about engineering, influence diversity in the field, and affect equity in engineering education and practice. We also explore how engineering cultures and environments respond to and change with individual and institutional agency. The course involves weekly presentations by scholars and engineers, readings, short writing assignments, small-group discussion, and hands-on, student-driven projects. Students can enroll in the course for 1 unit (lectures only), or 3 units (lectures+discussion+project). For 1 unit, students should sign up for Section 1 and Credit/No Credit grading, and for 3 units students should sign up for Section 2 and either the C/NC or Grade option.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

FINANCE 385: Angel and Venture Capital Financing for Entrepreneurs and Investors

This course covers all the stages of funding for early stage high-growth companies, from seed funding to venture capital rounds to a successful exit. We will concentrate on how entrepreneurs and investors make and should make important decisions. Examples of issues that we will cover are: How can entrepreneurs raise funding successfully? What are typical mistakes entrepreneurs make in raising capital and negotiating with investors? How to choose your investor? How to pitch to an investor? How do angels and VCs generate and process their deal flow and select companies? How are VCs involved in business decisions such as recruiting talent and replacing CEOs? What are the important provisions of financial contracts between VCs and founders? How to value early-stage companies? The course is very applied and mostly case-based. We will discuss a lot of nitty-gritty details that is a must for founders and investors. Case protagonists, founders, angels, and VCs will be among guest speakers. No prior knowledge of the VC industry is needed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

GEOLSCI 306: Virtual Scientific Presentation and Public Speaking (ESS 204, GEOPHYS 205)

The ability to present your research in a compelling, concise, and engaging manner will enhance your professional career. Virtual presentations make it harder to connect and interact with the audience, and to overcome this requires new skills, including video, sound, lighting, live vs. pre-recorded content, and virtual posters. These elements will be the focus of this class. But regardless of format, I will work to convince you that the best way to capture an audience and leave a lasting impression is to tell a story, do a demo, or pick a fight. The course is taught as a series of stand-and-deliver exercises with class feedback and revision on the fly, supplemented by one-on-one coaching. We will have sessions on virtual conference presentations, virtual job interviews and job talks, departmental seminars, webinars, press interviews, and funding pitches. My pledge is that everyone will come away a more skilled and confident speaker than they were before. Grades are optional: 70% in-class exercises, 30% final project, such as your upcoming AGU, GSA, or SEG presentation. It's best to take the course when you have research to present. ( http://syllabus.stanford.edu)
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Stein, R. (PI)

GEOPHYS 205: Virtual Scientific Presentation and Public Speaking (ESS 204, GEOLSCI 306)

The ability to present your research in a compelling, concise, and engaging manner will enhance your professional career. Virtual presentations make it harder to connect and interact with the audience, and to overcome this requires new skills, including video, sound, lighting, live vs. pre-recorded content, and virtual posters. These elements will be the focus of this class. But regardless of format, I will work to convince you that the best way to capture an audience and leave a lasting impression is to tell a story, do a demo, or pick a fight. The course is taught as a series of stand-and-deliver exercises with class feedback and revision on the fly, supplemented by one-on-one coaching. We will have sessions on virtual conference presentations, virtual job interviews and job talks, departmental seminars, webinars, press interviews, and funding pitches. My pledge is that everyone will come away a more skilled and confident speaker than they were before. Grades are optional: 70% in-class exercises, 30% final project, such as your upcoming AGU, GSA, or SEG presentation. It's best to take the course when you have research to present. ( http://syllabus.stanford.edu)
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Stein, R. (PI)

GSBGEN 208: Ethics in Management

With leadership comes responsibility. This course explores the numerous ethical issues faced by managers and organizations, and provides analytical frameworks as well as the latest findings on human behavior to inform ethical decisions and strategies. Readings involve controversial case studies, insights from experimental psychology and economics, and a brief introduction to some relevant philosophy. Through class exercises, rigorous discussion, and personal reflection, you will clarify your own ethical stance, think through ethical dilemmas, practice articulating recommendations compellingly, discover the diversity of ethical viewpoints, and find out how to avoid the social and cognitive pitfalls that come in the way of ethical leadership.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

GSBGEN 310: The Impact of AI on Productivity and Personal Performance

There is no denying that we are already in the AI-era, and though it may seem like a bit of overhyped technology to some, the truth is that around 90% of tech executives are currently working to expand AI¿s capabilities. Whether you plan to directly work with it or not, AI will undoubtedly have a large business, social, and economic impact as it becomes more and more advanced, bringing about the so-called ¿future of work.¿ This course invites guest speakers at the forefront of AI use to speak with you, so that regardless of prior experience or knowledge, you gain the expertise needed to grasp AI implications for your business career. Our speakers range from serial entrepreneurs to leaders within well-known companies, all aimed at offering valuable insights on many of the pertinent questions being asked today about AI. For example, how should a company change its internal and external strategy to take advantage of evolving AI and big data? Has COVID quickened the adoption or investment more »
There is no denying that we are already in the AI-era, and though it may seem like a bit of overhyped technology to some, the truth is that around 90% of tech executives are currently working to expand AI¿s capabilities. Whether you plan to directly work with it or not, AI will undoubtedly have a large business, social, and economic impact as it becomes more and more advanced, bringing about the so-called ¿future of work.¿ This course invites guest speakers at the forefront of AI use to speak with you, so that regardless of prior experience or knowledge, you gain the expertise needed to grasp AI implications for your business career. Our speakers range from serial entrepreneurs to leaders within well-known companies, all aimed at offering valuable insights on many of the pertinent questions being asked today about AI. For example, how should a company change its internal and external strategy to take advantage of evolving AI and big data? Has COVID quickened the adoption or investment of AI? Is an AI product/tool a worthy investment in the first place (even after COVID), and how would one go about determining that? Spread out in between these guest speakers are Socratic seminars to review and explore nuance with classmates, with grading focused around three written memos, one consulting-like group project, and class participation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Shaw, K. (PI)
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