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161 - 170 of 189 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

POLISCI 421K: Questionnaire Design for Surveys and Laboratory Experiments: Social and Cognitive Perspectives (COMM 339, PSYCH 231)

The social and psychological processes involved in asking and answering questions via questionnaires for the social sciences; optimizing questionnaire design; open versus closed questions; rating versus ranking; rating scale length and point labeling; acquiescence response bias; don't-know response options; response choice order effects; question order effects; social desirability response bias; attitude and behavior recall; and introspective accounts of the causes of thoughts and actions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Krosnick, J. (PI)

PSYCH 231: Questionnaire Design for Surveys and Laboratory Experiments: Social and Cognitive Perspectives (COMM 339, POLISCI 421K)

The social and psychological processes involved in asking and answering questions via questionnaires for the social sciences; optimizing questionnaire design; open versus closed questions; rating versus ranking; rating scale length and point labeling; acquiescence response bias; don't-know response options; response choice order effects; question order effects; social desirability response bias; attitude and behavior recall; and introspective accounts of the causes of thoughts and actions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Krosnick, J. (PI)

PSYCH 252: Statistical Methods for Behavioral and Social Sciences

This course offers an introduction to advanced topics in statistics with the focus of understanding data in the behavioral and social sciences. It is a practical course in which learning statistical concepts and building models in R go hand in hand. The course is organized into three parts: In the first part, we will learn how to visualize, wrangle, and simulate data in R. In the second part, we will cover topics in frequentist statistics (such as multiple regression, logistic regression, and mixed effects models) using the general linear model as an organizing framework. We will learn how to compare models using simulation methods such as bootstrapping and cross-validation. In the third part, we will focus on Bayesian data analysis as an alternative framework for answering statistical questions.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

RELIGST 391: Teaching Religious Studies

This seminar will help prepare you for your role as a university teacher both at a practical and a theoretical level. We will focus on how to best obtain (and keep) a new academic position. We will thus often work together on ¿nuts and bolts¿ issues such as syllabus design, engaging lectures, lively seminar discussions, positive classroom dynamics, and producing a strong teaching portfolio. We will also explore recent developments in pedagogical theory, cognitive science, and educational psychology that have bearing on effective university level teaching. These will be situated within the specific demands of the religious studies classroom and supplemented by guest speakers who will help us explore how institutional context affects the ways one teaches.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Penn, M. (PI)

SOC 280B: Introduction to Data Analysis (CSRE 180B, SOC 180B)

Methods for analyzing and evaluating quantitative data in sociological research. Students will be taught how to run and interpret multivariate regressions, how to test hypotheses, and how to read and critique published data analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jackson, M. (PI)

SOC 300: Workshop: The Art and Joy of Teaching

Note: for first-year Sociology Doctoral Students only.nThis class will prepare you for the important roles as undergraduate instructors at Stanford. It rests on the idea that teaching is not only an art that we can all learn, continually improve, and cultivate; teaching can also become a source of great joy and personal meaning during your graduate career, and beyond. You will not only learn how to become an effective instructor in your day-to-day teaching roles (e.g., how to write a compelling syllabus, deliver a powerful lecture, lead an engaging discussion section, build an inclusive classroom, juggle with teaching logistics, make best use of technology, campus resources etc.); you will also discover that teaching is - above all a deeply personal process. While your students will all have different backgrounds, stories and learning styles, we, too, all have different philosophies and ways of teaching. Throughout this class, we will help each other explore what these might be, how we can develop and cultivate them, and, finally, how we can actively employ them to foster learning environments that allow for both academic, as well as personal growth. It is my hope that, at the end of this class, you will embark on your very own educational journeys as teacher-learners who unlock the many great potentials that reside not only in your students, but also in you: plus est en vous! There is more in you (than you think!) With this in mind and the right tools in our hands, we can begin to positively transform our students, while allowing ourselves to be transformed by them at the very same time: this is the art and joy of teaching.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Boch, A. (PI)

SOC 356: Strategy and Organizations

Why are some organizations more competitive than others?  This is one of the defining questions of the interdisciplinary research field known as strategic management.  In this seminar, we will survey the field of strategic management as seen through the lens of organization theory, touching on the four main theoretical approaches that have developed there.nnnMost work in strategic management pays little attention to particular theoretical perspectives, and is organized more by the topic - the phenomenon being studied - such as market exit, growth, performance, mergers and acquisitions, innovation, and the like.  I have catalogued the research in strategic management both according to theoretical perspective and topic, and that structure is developed in this course.  Our goal is to help you to identify theoretical perspectives as you try to understand the strategy field.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOMGEN 275: Leading Value Improvement in Health Care Delivery

Successful leaders on the journey to better care delivery methods with lower total spending inevitably face challenges. What confluence of attitudes, values, strategy, and events allows them to prevail? Contexts will include public policy, entrepreneurship and early stage investing, care delivery innovations, and health care system management to improve the value of care. Course faculty and guests will consist of nationally recognized leaders, innovators, and change agents. The course is open to any member of the Stanford community aspiring to lead value improvement in health care delivery including medical, MBA, law, and graduate students, as well as undergraduates, postdoctoral candidates, and medical center trainees. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

SOMGEN 282: The Startup Garage: Design (CHEMENG 482)

(Same as STRAMGT 356) The Startup Garage is an experiential lab course that focuses on the design, testing and launch of a new venture. Multidisciplinary student teams work through an iterative process of understanding user needs, creating a point of view statement, ideating and prototyping new product and services and their business models, and communicating the user need, product, service and business models to end-users, partners, and investors. In the autumn quarter, teams will: identify and validate a compelling user need and develop very preliminary prototypes for a new product or service and business models. Students form teams, conduct field work and iterate on the combination of business model -- product -- market. Teams will present their first prototypes (business model - product - market) at the end of the quarter to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
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