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121 - 130 of 189 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

GSBGEN 565: Political Communication: How Leaders Become Leaders

Politics, perhaps like no other arena, provides a rich and dramatic laboratory for studying the art and science of influential communication. Whether it is a local school bond election or a Congressional race, a Presidential debate or a State of the Union Address, the demanding communications of politics provide insights into our own strengths and gaps as a communicator and leader. Political campaigns, by their very nature, are highly visible, oriented toward very specific objectives, and increasingly leverage a variety of new media platforms. They are often emotionally charged, and rife with conflict and drama. The principles of political communications transcend politics, and are useful guides for leaders in business, the non-profit community, as well as government. How candidates, elected officials, and leaders in all kinds of organizations communicate vision, values, and experience, as well as how they perform in very fluid environments, not the least of which may be during a crisis, has a great deal to do with their career success. In its ninth year, this highly interactive course allows students to explore both theory and practice behind effective positioning and presentation. Last year was a presidential election year in the United States, and was an extraordinary event in many respects. Students will analyze and evaluate both successful and unsuccessful communications strategies of political campaigns and candidates. They will explore historic examples of US Presidential debates, from Nixon/Kennedy to the present. Further they will experience political events as they happen -- like last year's campaigns -- with each class drawing lessons from political developments around the nation and the world. Students will also hone their own strategic communications skills in activities requiring both written and spoken communication. This is not a course in political science, American government, or in public speaking. However, the engaged student will gain insights into those areas as well.The course is taught by David Demarest, Vice President of Public Affairs for Stanford University. Demarest has broad communications experience across the public and private sector in financial services, education, and government. After serving as Assistant U.S. Trade Representative, and Assistant Secretary of Labor in the Reagan Administration, in 1988 he served as Communications Director for Vice President George H. W. Bush's successful presidential campaign. He then became a member of the White House senior staff as White House Communications Director. After leaving government in 1993, he spent the next decade leading communications for two Fortune 50 companies, before coming to Stanford in 2005.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
Instructors: Demarest, D. (PI)

HISTORY 305: Graduate Pedagogy Workshop

Required of first-year History Ph.D. students. Perspectives on pedagogy for historians: course design, lecturing, leading discussion, evaluation of student learning, use of technology in teaching lectures and seminars. Addressing today's classroom: sexual harassment issues, integrating diversity, designing syllabi to include students with disabilities.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Como, D. (PI)

HISTORY 399A: Preparing for International Field Work: Public Service or Research (HISTORY 299X)

Open to students in all classes, those planning internships abroad and those planning research, from juniors with honors theses and sophomores with Chappell Lougee grants to freshmen thinking ahead. Introduces resources on campus for planning international research and service. Raises issues that need to be considered in advance of going abroad: ethical concerns, Human Subjects Protocol, networking, personal safety and gender issues, confronting cultural differences. Exposes students to research methods: case studies, interviewing, working in foreign libraries and archives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HRP 214: Scientific Writing

Step-by-step through the process of writing and publishing a scientific manuscript. How to write effectively, concisely, and clearly in preparation of an actual scientific manuscript. Students are encouraged to bring a manuscript on which they are currently working to develop and polish throughout the course. Please note 3-units students will additionally write and revise a manuscript.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Sainani, K. (PI)

HRP 223: Introduction to Data Management and Analysis in SAS

Provides hands-on introduction to basic data management and analysis techniques using SAS. Data management topics include: Introduction to SAS and SAS syntax, importing data, creating and reading SAS datasets, data cleaning and validation, creating new variables, and combining data sets. Analysis techniques include: basic descriptive statistics (e.g., means, frequency) and bivariate procedures for continuous and categorical variables (e.g., t-tests, chi-squares).
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

HRP 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sorcar, P. (PI)

INDE 212: Medical Humanities and the Arts

The interdisciplinary field of medical humanities: the use of the arts and humanities to examine medicine in personal, social, and cultural contexts. Topics include the doctor/patient relationship, the patient perspective, the meaning of doctoring, and the meaning of illness. Sources include visual and performing arts, film, and literary genres such as poetry, fiction, and scholarly writing. Designed for medical students in the Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities Scholarly Concentration, but all students are welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Shafer, A. (PI)

INDE 230: Topics in Scientific Management

Designed for postdocs and advanced graduate students. Reviews management skills necessary for successfully assuming leadership roles in scientific research. Addresses some of the most difficult aspects of developing, directing, and managing people and projects and running a research group, especially issues that new faculty have traditionally learned by trial and error over a number of years. Topics include: the faculty job search process and strategies, key elements in starting a lab, basic principles regarding legal dimensions of scientific activity (intellectual property, royalties, links with industry), team science, research ethics, communication and negotiation skills, and writing and securing grants.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

INDE 234: Introduction to Writing Research Proposals

Practical instruction in research proposal writing. Suitable for advanced graduate students. Substantial writing component. Enrollment by instructor approval only.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

LATINAM 207: Spanish in Science/Science in Spanish (BIO 208, EARTHSYS 207)

For graduate and undergraduate students interested in the natural sciences and the Spanish language. Students will acquire the ability to communicate in Spanish using scientific language and will enhance their ability to read scientific literature written in Spanish. Emphasis on the development of science in Spanish-speaking countries or regions. Course is conducted in Spanish and intended for students pursuing degrees in the sciences, particularly disciplines such as ecology, environmental science, sustainability, resource management, anthropology, and archeology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Dirzo, R. (PI)
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