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121 - 130 of 301 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

EDUC 423: Introduction to Data Science (EDUC 143, SOC 302)

Social scientists can benefit greatly from utilizing new data sources like electronic administration records or digital communications, but they require tools and techniques to make sense of their scope and complexity. This course offers the opportunity to understand and apply popular data science techniques regarding data visualization, data reduction and data analysis.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

EDUC 426: Unleashing Personal Potential: Behavioral Science and Design Thinking Applied to Self (PSYCH 264)

This course facilitates the application of the methods, theories, and findings of behavioral science to students own lives and improvement projects. It does so by combining behavioral science with a design thinking approach. You will learn to identify your potential, navigate to achieve it, and stay resilient during the journey. Students will design their own action plans, define goals and prototype strategies to test them, in an iterative feedback cycle. Our course thus blends two intellectual streams that seldom intersect: behavioral science and design thinking.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4

EDUC 430C: Using Data to Describe the World: Descriptive Social Science Research Techniques (SOC 258C)

This course focuses on the skills needed to conduct theoretically-informed and policy-relevant descriptive social science. Students read recent examples of rigorous descriptive quantitative research that exemplifies the use of data to describe important phenomena related to educational and social inequality. The course will help develop skills necessary to conceptualize, operationalize, and communicate descriptive research, including techniques related to measurement and measurement error, data harmonization, data reduction, and visualization. Students develop a descriptive project during the course. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of a course in multivariate regression.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit

EDUC 445: Entrepreneurial Approaches to Education Reform

(Same as STRAMGT 335) In this course, students will investigate opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurial ventures trying to make a positive impact in public education. The course requires a basic level of understanding of the U.S. K-12 public school system. The first session will analyze the structure of the public education as an industry, with a special emphasis on understanding the achievement gap. Subsequent sessions will explore challenges in increasing efficacy, ensuring financial sustainability, and scaling for entrepreneurs who have sought to change student outcomes, solve pain points, and innovate. The course will feature a variety of ventures (including schools, education technology, training, and supplemental services) and organizational models (for-profit, not-for-profit, and benefit corporation). This course is suitable for students aspiring to be entrepreneurs, leaders in entrepreneurial organizations, leaders in educational organizations, Board members, donors or investors. (Note: this is not a "how-to" course on starting an entrepreneurial venture.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Lee, G. (PI)

EDUC 450C: Qualitative Interviewing

Addressing the theoretical underpinnings of qualitative interviews as well as the application of theory to practice, this course considers different approaches to interviewing. Interview types covered will range from group interviews to individual interviews, and from unstructured, ethnographically oriented interviews to highly structured interviews. Working with community partners to facilitate application to practice, the students will move from theory to interview design, implementation, and initial stages of analysis, with an emphasis on consistency in approach and utility in graduate-level research.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

EE 292I: Insanely Great Products: How do they get built?

Great products emerge from a sometimes conflict-laden process of collaboration between different functions within companies. This Seminar seeks to demystify this process via case-studies of successful products and companies. Engineering management and businesspeople will share their experiences in discussion with students. Previous companies profiled: Apple, Intel, Facebook, and Genentech -- to name a few. Previous guests include: Jon Rubinstein (NeXT, Apple, Palm), Diane Greene (VMware), and Ted Hoff (Intel). Pre-requisites: None
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Obershaw, D. (PI)

EE 402A: Topics in International Technology Management (EALC 402A, EASTASN 402A)

Theme for Autumn 2019 is "Edge Computing: Different Directions for Asia and the U.S.?" Distinguished guest speakers discuss Asian and U.S. approaches to 5G network integration, federated learning, computer chips and servers for edge AI processing, and IOT systems built around intelligent clients, such as register-less stores, smart factories, autonomous vehicles, and augmented reality applications. See syllabus for specific requirements, which may differ from those of other seminars at Stanford.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Dasher, R. (PI)

EE 402T: Entrepreneurship in Asian High Tech Industries (EALC 402T, EASTASN 402T)

Distinctive patterns and challenges of entrepreneurship in Asia; update of business and technology issues in the creation and growth of start-up companies in major Asian economies. Distinguished speakers from industry, government, and academia.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

EFSLANG 690A: Interacting in English

Strategies for communicating effectively in social and academic settings. Informal and formal language used in campus settings, including starting and maintaining conversations, asking questions, making complaints, and contributing ideas and opinions. Simulations and discussions, with feedback on pronunciation, grammar, and usage. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3

EFSLANG 690B: Academic Discussion

Skills for effective participation in classroom settings, seminars, and research group meetings. Pronunciation, grammar, and appropriateness for specific tasks. Feedback on language and communication style. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 690A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
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