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121 - 130 of 285 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

EDUC 377F: Disruptions in Education

(Same as GSBGEN 345). This course will explore the contemporary higher education industry, focusing especially on the places where disruptions of all kinds present significant opportunities and challenges for investors, entrepreneurs, and the businesses that serve this huge global market, as well as for faculty, students, and higher education administrators. Using a variety of readings and case studies to better understand recent disruptions and the unbundling occurring across the post-secondary landscape, from outside and inside the academy, both for-profit and non-profit, the course will examine technology in teaching and learning; the future of the degree and alternatives to the traditional credential; accreditation; competency based education; debt and education financing models; investing in the education space; and tertiary products and platforms that serve the student services market. Guests will include higher education leaders and practitioners, as well as investors and entrepreneurs. Attendance at first class meeting is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Urstein, R. (PI)

EDUC 377G: Problem Solving for Social Change

(Also GSBGEN 367). Stanford graduates will play important roles in solving many of today's and tomorrow's major societal problems -- such as improving educational and health outcomes, conserving energy, and reducing global poverty -- which call for actions by nonprofit, business, and hybrid organizations as well as governments. This course teaches skills and bodies of knowledge relevant to these roles through problems and case studies drawn from nonprofit organizations, for-profit social enterprises, and governments. Topics include designing, implementing, scaling, and evaluating social strategies; systems thinking; decision making under risk; psychological biases that adversely affect people's decisions; methods for influencing individuals' and organizations' behavior, ranging from incentives and penalties to "nudges;" human-centered design; corporate social responsibility; and pay-for-success programs. We will apply these concepts and tools to address an actual social problem facing Stanford University. (With the exception of several classes on strategy and evaluation, there is no substantial overlap with Paul Brest's and Mark Wolfson's course, Strategic Philanthropy and Impact Investing ( GSBGEN 319), which has a different focus from this one.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Brest, P. (PI)

EDUC 377H: Diverse Leadership as an Imperative for Impact

(Same as GSBGEN 377). Our society implicitly prizes a particular approach to leadership - but today's cross-sectoral, impact-oriented leader cannot afford to be restricted to a single approach. If we aspire to address challenges across social, economic, and political arenas, with highly charged moral implications and multiple stakeholders, we have an imperative to use all available tools by discovering, celebrating, and advancing diversity in leadership. In this course, we will: (1) study a range of effective leadership approaches; (2) develop broad, transportable skills and frameworks required to lead in any complex setting - business, public sector, nonprofit sector; (3) delve into leadership tradeoffs and tensions; (4) explore and understand our own values and tacit and explicit decision-making criteria; and (5) recognize barriers to diversity and tactics to address them. Guiding questions will include: How does the context shape the solution set? What does inspired and inspiring l more »
(Same as GSBGEN 377). Our society implicitly prizes a particular approach to leadership - but today's cross-sectoral, impact-oriented leader cannot afford to be restricted to a single approach. If we aspire to address challenges across social, economic, and political arenas, with highly charged moral implications and multiple stakeholders, we have an imperative to use all available tools by discovering, celebrating, and advancing diversity in leadership. In this course, we will: (1) study a range of effective leadership approaches; (2) develop broad, transportable skills and frameworks required to lead in any complex setting - business, public sector, nonprofit sector; (3) delve into leadership tradeoffs and tensions; (4) explore and understand our own values and tacit and explicit decision-making criteria; and (5) recognize barriers to diversity and tactics to address them. Guiding questions will include: How does the context shape the solution set? What does inspired and inspiring leadership look like? How do race/gender/other identities enter into the equation? How do I develop my own brand of leadership? We will examine contemporary leaders and controversies in education and elsewhere, draw upon timeless historical thinkers, enjoy the wisdom of guest speakers, and work intensively in small groups to highlight challenges, opportunities, and tradeoffs. By exploring a range of approaches and situations, we will strive for deeper understanding of ourselves and of the context to become a more capable, empathetic and effective leaders.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Colby, S. (PI)

EDUC 386: Leadership and Administration in Higher Education

Definitions of leadership and leadership roles within colleges and universities. Leadership models and organizational concepts. Case study analysis of the problems and challenges facing today's higher education administrators.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

EDUC 389A: Race, Ethnicity, and Language: Racial, Ethnic, and Linguistic Formations (ANTHRO 320A, CSRE 389A, LINGUIST 253)

Language, as a cultural resource for shaping our identities, is central to the concepts of race and ethnicity. This seminar explores the linguistic construction of race and ethnicity across a wide variety of contexts and communities. We begin with an examination of the concepts of race and ethnicity and what it means to be "doing race," both as scholarship and as part of our everyday lives. Throughout the course, we will take a comparative perspective and highlight how different racial/ethnic formations (Asian, Black, Latino, Native American, White, etc.) participate in similar, yet different, ways of drawing racial and ethnic distinctions. The seminar will draw heavily on scholarship in (linguistic) anthropology, sociolinguistics and education. We will explore how we talk and don't talk about race, how we both position ourselves and are positioned by others, how the way we talk can have real consequences on the trajectory of our lives, and how, despite this, we all participate in maintaining racial and ethnic hierarchies and inequality more generally, particularly in schools.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Rosa, J. (PI)

EDUC 390: Urban Schools, Social Policy, and the Gentrifying City (CSRE 291, URBANST 141A)

This course is designed to help students develop a more sophisticated understanding of educational inequality in the contemporary U.S. city. This course will survey existing literature about the intersection of gentrification and urban schooling, focusing on policies and practices that gave rise to the current urban condition, theory and research about urban redevelopment, collateral consequences for schools and communities, and how these issues relate to the structure and governance of urban schools as well as to the geography of opportunity more broadly.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: pearman, f. (PI)

EDUC 391: Engineering Education and Online Learning (ENGR 391)

A project based introduction to web-based learning design. In this course we will explore the evidence and theory behind principles of learning design and game design thinking. In addition to gaining a broad understanding of the emerging field of the science and engineering of learning, students will experiment with a variety of educational technologies, pedagogical techniques, game design principles, and assessment methods. Over the course of the quarter, interdisciplinary teams will create a prototype or a functioning piece of educational technology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Bowen, K. (PI)

EDUC 392: Education for Liberation: A History of African American Education, 1800 to the Present (CSRE 292)

This course examines discourses around education and freedom in African American educational thought from the 19th century to the present, using both primary sources and the works of current historians. The course pays particular attention to how the educational philosophies of different African American thinkers reflected their conceptions of what shape freedom might take in the American context, and the tension between educational outlooks that sought inclusion or integration versus those that prized self-determination. We will also be attentive to the ways in which age, gender, geography, class, and color worked to influence the pursuit and achievement of various African American educational visions. This will be a 3-5 credit course and meet as a seminar open both to graduate students and advanced undergraduates.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Hines, M. (PI)

EDUC 398: Core Mechanics for Learning

In game play, core mechanics refers to the rules of interaction that drive the game forward. This class will consider whether there are core mechanics that can drive learning forward, and if so, how to build them into learning environments. The course mixes basic theory, research methods, and application of learning principles.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Blair, K. (PI)

EDUC 399A: Designing Surveys

This workshop/course is designed for students who are designing a survey to collect quantitative data for a research project. The workshop content draws on relevant cognitive processing theories and research related to development of good survey questions. In addition to some readings and a few mini lectures, this workshop is designed to be highly interactive and practical. By the end of the course students will have designed and pilot tested their survey instrument. Course enrollment is limited to 12 students and may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 20 times (up to 40 units total)
Instructors: Porteus, A. (PI)
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