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111 - 120 of 285 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

EDUC 340: Psychology and American Indian/Alaska Native Mental Health (NATIVEAM 240, PSYCH 272)

Western medicine's definition of health as the absence of sickness, disease, or pathology; Native American cultures' definition of health as the beauty of physical, spiritual, emotional, and social things, and sickness as something out of balance. Topics include: historical trauma; spirituality and healing; cultural identity; values and acculturation; and individual, school, and community-based interventions. Prerequisite: experience working with American Indian communities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

EDUC 341: Counterstory in Literature and Education (CSRE 141E, EDUC 141, LIFE 124)

Counterstory is a method developed in critical legal studies that emerges out of the broad "narrative turn" in the humanities and social science. This course explores the value of this turn, especially for marginalized communities, and the use of counterstory as analysis, critique, and self-expression. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we examine counterstory as it has developed in critical theory, critical pedagogy, and critical race theory literatures, and explore it as a framework for liberation, cultural work, and spiritual exploration.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Antonio, A. (PI)

EDUC 351A: Statistical Methods for Longitudinal Research (STATS 222)

See http://rogosateaching.com/stat222/. Research designs and statistical procedures for time-ordered (repeated-measures) data. The analysis of longitudinal panel data is central to empirical research on learning, development, aging, and the effects of interventions. Topics include: measurement of change, growth curve models, analysis of durations including survival analysis, experimental and non-experimental group comparisons, reciprocal effects, stability. Prerequisite: intermediate statistical methods.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Rogosa, D. (PI)

EDUC 355: Higher Education and Society

For undergraduates and graduate students interested in what colleges and universities do, and what society expects of them. The relationship between higher education and society in the U.S. from a sociological perspective. The nature of reform and conflict in colleges and universities, and tensions in the design of higher education systems and organizations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Gumport, P. (PI)

EDUC 366: Learning in Formal and Informal Environments

How learning opportunities are organized in schools and non-school settings including museums, after-school clubs, community art centers, theater groups, aquariums, sports teams, and new media contexts. Sociocultural theories of development as a conceptual framework. Readings from empirical journals, web publications, and books.Collaborative written or multimedia research project in which students observe and document a non-school learning environment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

EDUC 371: Social Psychology and Social Change (PSYCH 265)

The course is intended as an exploration of the major ideas, theories, and findings of social psychology and their applied status. Special attention will be given to historical issues, classic experiments, and seminal theories, and their implications for topics relevant to education. Contemporary research will also be discussed. Advanced undergraduates and graduate students from other disciplines are welcome, but priority for enrollment will be given to graduate students. In order to foster a vibrant, discussion-based class, enrollment will be capped at 20 students. Interested students should enroll in the class through simple enroll or axess. There will be an application process on the first day of class if there is overwhelming interest. Please contact the course TA, Isabelle Tay (isabelletay[at]stanford.edu), if you have any further questions.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

EDUC 374: Philanthropy and Civil Society (POLISCI 334, SOC 374)

Cross-listed with Law ( LAW 7071), Political Science ( POLISCI 334) and Sociology ( SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit (up to 297 units total)

EDUC 377B: Impact: Strategic Leadership of Nonprofit Organizations and Social Ventures

(Same as STRAMGT 368). This course seeks to provide a survey of the strategic, governance, and management issues facing a wide range of nonprofit organizations and their executive and board leaders, in the era of venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. The students will also be introduced to core managerial issues uniquely defined by this sector such as development/fundraising, investment management, performance management and nonprofit finance. The course also provides an overview of the sector, including its history and economics. Cases involve a range of nonprofits, from smaller, social entrepreneurial to larger, more traditional organizations, including education, social service, environment, health care, religion, NGO's and performing arts. In exploring these issues, this course reinforces the frameworks and concepts of strategic management introduced in the core first year courses. In addition to case discussions, the course employs role plays, study group exercises and many outsider speakers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Jonker, K. (PI)

EDUC 377C: Philanthropy, Inclusivity and Leadership

(Same as GSBGEN 581) A philanthropist is anyone who gives anything-time, expertise, networks, credibility, influence, dollars, experience-in any amount to create a better world. Regardless of one's age, background or profession, everyone has the potential to lead in a way that both tackles the complex social problems our interconnected world faces and creates greater inclusivity, access and impact. This demanding two-week, compressed course will provide passionate students with a brave space to develop and refine a plan for their own social change journey and amplify their potential to give, live and lead in a way that matters more. Using design thinking, students will challenge their preconceptions and wrestle with their social change approach, their privileged position as future Stanford graduates and philanthropy's role in society. Lectures and class discussions will inspire and prepare students to create social value with greater intentionality and humility. For the first class, s more »
(Same as GSBGEN 581) A philanthropist is anyone who gives anything-time, expertise, networks, credibility, influence, dollars, experience-in any amount to create a better world. Regardless of one's age, background or profession, everyone has the potential to lead in a way that both tackles the complex social problems our interconnected world faces and creates greater inclusivity, access and impact. This demanding two-week, compressed course will provide passionate students with a brave space to develop and refine a plan for their own social change journey and amplify their potential to give, live and lead in a way that matters more. Using design thinking, students will challenge their preconceptions and wrestle with their social change approach, their privileged position as future Stanford graduates and philanthropy's role in society. Lectures and class discussions will inspire and prepare students to create social value with greater intentionality and humility. For the first class, students will submit a proposed social impact plan for their professional, philanthropic and civic lives. Over the course's six sessions, students will refine their plan, creating a formal theory of change that strategically utilizes their unique leadership platform and asset portfolio to advance opportunity and justice for a target population. Potential guest speakers include Darren Walker, President of the Ford Foundation; Justin Steele, Principal at Google.org; Crystal Hayling, Executive Director of the Libra Foundation; Rob Reich of Stanford PACS and Laura Muñoz Arnold, Co-Chair of the Laura and John Arnold Foundation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

EDUC 377F: Disruptions in Education

(Same as GSBGEN 345). This course will explore the contemporary higher education industry, focusing especially on the places where disruptions of all kinds present significant opportunities and challenges for investors, entrepreneurs, and the businesses that serve this huge global market, as well as for faculty, students, and higher education administrators. Using a variety of readings and case studies to better understand recent disruptions and the unbundling occurring across the post-secondary landscape, from outside and inside the academy, both for-profit and non-profit, the course will examine technology in teaching and learning; the future of the degree and alternatives to the traditional credential; accreditation; competency based education; debt and education financing models; investing in the education space; and tertiary products and platforms that serve the student services market. Guests will include higher education leaders and practitioners, as well as investors and entrepreneurs. Attendance at first class meeting is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Urstein, R. (PI)
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