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81 - 90 of 381 results for: VPGE::*

DLCL 312: Pitching and Publishing in Popular Media (ENGLISH 318, FEMGEN 312F)

Most of the time, writing a pitch for a popular outlet just means writing an email. So why be intimidated? This course will outline the procedure for pitching essays and articles to popular media: how to convince an editor, agent, or anyone else that your idea is compelling, relevant, and deliverable. We'll take a holistic approach to self-presentation that includes presenting yourself with confidence, optimizing your social media and web platform, networking effectively, writing excellent queries and pitches, avoiding the slush pile, and perhaps most importantly, persevering through the inevitable self-doubt and rejection.We will focus on distinguishing the language, topics and hooks of popular media writing from those of academic writing, learn how to target and query editors on shortform pieces (personal essays, news stories, etc.), and explore how humanists can effectively self-advocate and get paid for their work.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 1
Instructors: Goode, L. (PI)

DLCL 396: Humanities+Design: Visualizing the Grand Tour (CLASSICS 396, HISTORY 336E)

Study of the eighteenth-century Grand Tour of Italy through visualization tools of the digital age. Critical readings in both visual epistemology and current Grand Tour studies; interrogating the relationship between quantitative and qualitative approaches in digital humanities; what new insights in eighteenth-century British travel to Italy does data visualization offer us? Students will transform traditional texts and documents into digital datasets, developing individual data analysis projects using text mining, data capture and visualization techniques.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

EARTH 200A: Your Professional Development

Navigating the transition from student to professional is a daunting and often times unpredictable journey. This course is designed to help start the process of career planning and development early on. Beginning with navigating career uncertainty, through thoughtful self-assessment, to resume building, the power of negotiation, and managing up - this course builds a solid foundation on which to explore your long-term career goals.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Yau, A. (PI)

EARTH 200B: Your Personal Development

Success in both your professional and personal life requires emotional, financial, and social intelligence. This course is designed to build on those soft skills that will better prepare you to successfully navigate your life. Develop skills in areas ranging from emotional intelligence, decision making courage, living well under pressure, managing procrastination, conflict resolution, relationship building, influencing, ethics & integrity, and financial literacy.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

EARTH 200P: Your Professional Development Practicum

Developing a strong portfolio of skills and tools takes resources and partners. This practicum enables the freedom to explore and develop a specific component of your professional portfolio with instructor support. You will set a professional development goal at the start of the quarter and then build a self-directed set of experiences that engage on-campus resources, professional society opportunities, and/or external partners to explore and develop new skills. Completion will include reflection on the experience, feedback from peers and mentors, and a concrete product that expands your professional ¿toolkit.¿ This practicum is recommended for latter stage graduate students, or following completion of Earth 200A.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

EARTH 202: PhD Students on the PhD

This seminar is designed for coterms and upperclassmen who are considering pursuing a PhD in earth science fields but want to know what that path really entails. Consisting of small-group discussions with current PhD students, this course will feature conversations on a range of PhD research topics and will also delve into the substance of the PhD experience itself. We will explore PhD students' programs and career paths: the milestones, processes, and issues that guide their decisions and shape their PhD experiences. Discussion themes will be determined partly in advance and partly based on the interests of participants and could include topics such as choosing a PhD program or research question, interdisciplinarity, community engagement, or work/life balance.
Last offered: Winter 2016

EARTH 218: Communicating Science

For undergraduates and graduate students interested in teaching science in local schools. Inquiry-based science teaching methods. How to communicate scientific knowledge and improve presentations. Six weeks of supervised teaching in a local school classroom. Prerequisite: course in introductory biology, geology, chemistry, or marine sciences.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | Repeatable for credit

EARTH 219: OPINION WRITING IN THE SCIENCES

Part exposition, part reflection, part synthesis, research-driven opinion writing can be found everywhere from the op-ed pages of daily newspapers, to the commentary sections of journals such as Nature and Science, to the sort of wide-ranging reviews found in the New York Review of Books. In this course, advanced doctoral students will study the form, and work with the instructors to develop a publication-quality opinion essay on an aspect of their own field. Admission is limited and by application only. Contact thayden@stanford.edu.
Last offered: Spring 2016

EARTH 251: Negotiation (CEE 151, CEE 251, PUBLPOL 152)

Students learn to prepare for and conduct negotiations in a variety of arenas including getting a job, managing workplace conflict, negotiating transactions, and managing personal relationships. Interactive class. The internationally travelled instructor who has mediated cases in over 75 countries will require students to negotiate real life case studies and discuss their results in class. Application required before first day of class; students should enroll on Axess and complete the application on Canvas before March 20, 2020. Note: there is a class fee of $130 for access to case files and readings.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

EARTHSYS 177C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism (COMM 177C, COMM 277C, EARTHSYS 277C)

Practical, collaborative, writing-intensive advanced journalistic reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of health and science journalism. Science and journalism students learn how to identify and write engaging stories about medicine, global health, science, and related environmental issues; how to assess the quality and relevance of science news; how to cover the health and science beats effectively and efficiently; and how to build bridges between the worlds of journalism and science. Instructed Winter Quarter 2019 by Dr. Seema Yasmin,  http://www.seemayasmin.com. nnnLimited enrollment: preference to students enrolled in or considering the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program and the Graduate Journalism Program. Prerequisite:  EarthSys 191/291,  COMM 104w, or consent of instructor. Admission by application only, available from dr.yasmin@stanford.edu (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Win | Units: 5
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