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301 - 310 of 381 results for: VPGE::*

MUSIC 280: TA Training Course

Required for doctoral students serving as teaching assistants. Orientation to resources at Stanford, guest presentations on the principles of common teaching activities, supervised teaching experience. Students who entered in the Autumn should take 280 in the Spring prior to the Autumn they begin teaching.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

NBIO 227: Understanding Techniques in Neuroscience

Students will learn to select and evaluate multidisciplinary techniques for approaching modern neuroscience questions. A combination of lectures and small group paper discussions will introduce techniques from molecular, genetic, behavioral, electrophysiological, imaging, and computational neuroscience. Students will be expected to complete homework assignments analyzing primary literature and attend optional laboratory demonstrations. Intended for graduate students, postdocs, and staff from any discipline; and for advanced undergraduates in the biosciences, engineering, or medicine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

OB 381: Conflict Management and Negotiation

Conflict is unavoidable in every organization. The key question is how it will be handled: will it escalate to dysfunctional levels or will it be effectively managed? Hence, a first aim of the course is to develop your ability to analyze conflicts, to look beneath the surface rhetoric of a conflict, to isolate the important underlying interests, and to determine what sort of agreement (if any) is feasible. We'll analyze which negotiation strategies are effective in different conflicts. We'll also examine psychological and structural factors that create conflict and often pose a barrier to its resolution. But understanding how to analyze a conflict is not enough. To manage conflict effectively, you need a broad repertoire of behavioral skills. Developing these is the second aim of the course. To achieve this, negotiation exercises are used in every session. When playing a role in a simulated conflict, you will be free to try out tactics that might feel uncomfortable in a real one. You will get feedback from your classmates about how you come across. In sum, you can use this course to expand your repertoire of skills, to hone your skills, and to become more adept in choosing when to apply each skill.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Bendor, J. (PI)

OB 512: Creating, Building, and Sustaining Breakthrough Ventures

This course is designed to provide students with a summary of entrepreneurial processes that have successfully created, developed, and sustained breakthrough ventures. By "breakthrough" we mean ventures that have a lasting and positive impact, touching millions of lives. Examples are based on the experiences of Norman Winarsky, formerly President of SRI Ventures, Charles O¿Reilly, and invited speakers who are leading investors and entrepreneurs. They include companies like Siri, Nuance, Intuitive Surgical, Sandisk, Facebook, and others. Think of this course as a ¿master class¿. You will work with the professors and invited speakers to create and build your venture concept. We focus on all elements of building a breakthrough company, starting with the source of breakthrough venture ideas, advancing to building a great value proposition and business plan, recruiting a team, finding investors and board members, scaling the company, deciding whether to sell or go IPO, and ending with what more »
This course is designed to provide students with a summary of entrepreneurial processes that have successfully created, developed, and sustained breakthrough ventures. By "breakthrough" we mean ventures that have a lasting and positive impact, touching millions of lives. Examples are based on the experiences of Norman Winarsky, formerly President of SRI Ventures, Charles O¿Reilly, and invited speakers who are leading investors and entrepreneurs. They include companies like Siri, Nuance, Intuitive Surgical, Sandisk, Facebook, and others. Think of this course as a ¿master class¿. You will work with the professors and invited speakers to create and build your venture concept. We focus on all elements of building a breakthrough company, starting with the source of breakthrough venture ideas, advancing to building a great value proposition and business plan, recruiting a team, finding investors and board members, scaling the company, deciding whether to sell or go IPO, and ending with what it takes to build a company that can sustain itself through continuous innovation. At each step, we follow examples of companies we've helped build, and provide lessons of success as well as failure. The course will be highly interactive, and engage students in elements of building their own venture concepts.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

OB 513: Beyond Disruption: Entrepreneurial Leadership Within Existing Organizations

Why do large, successful companies often have such difficulty in disrupting themselves (e.g., Kodak, Blockbuster, Borders)? How do you maintain an entrepreneurial edge within an existing enterprise? How do you sustain core businesses while simultaneously adapting to disruptive threats? In this course, students will build the skills to spot threats and opportunities earlier and capture them faster. The course will take a look at some of the most successful ¿creators within corporations¿ and discern why some strategies succeed when others do not. We will explore the framework that some companies have developed to simultaneously compete in their core business while exploring new ones. To do this we will interact with guests from firms like Walmart, Amazon, General Motors, Flex and IBM as well as venture capitalists and entrepreneurs. Our objective is to help students understand in some detail what it takes to help organizations stay ahead of disruptive threats and to avoid problems that often lead companies into decline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

OB 612: Careers and Organizations

The careers of individuals are shaped by their movement within and between organizations, whether those be established employers or entrepreneurial ventures. Conversely, organizations of all sizes are shaped by the flows of individuals through them as individuals construct careers by pursuing different opportunities. This course will examine sociological and economic theory and research on this mutually constitutive relationship. Possible topics include inequality and attainment processes, internal labor markets, mobility dynamics, individual and organizational learning, ecological influences, gender and racial segregation, discrimination, and entrepreneurship as a career process.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Sorensen, J. (PI)

OB 670: Designing Social Research

This is a course in the design of social research, with a particular emphasis on research field (i.e., non-laboratory) settings. As such, the course is a forum for discussing and developing an understanding of the different strategies social theorists employ to explain social processes, develop theories, and make these theories as believable as possible. In general, these issues will be discussed in the context of sociological research on organizations, but this will not be the exclusive focus of the course. A range of topics will be covered, for example: formulating and motivating research questions; varieties of explanation; experimental and quasi-experimental methods, including natural experiments; counterfactual models; conceptualization and measurement; sampling and case selection; qualitative and quantitative approaches. This course is particularly oriented toward developing an appreciation of the tradeoffs of different approaches. It is well suited to Ph.D. students working on qualifying papers and dissertation proposals.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Carroll, G. (PI)

ORALCOMM 215: Voice Workshop (ORALCOMM 115)

Focus is on breath, voice production, expansion of vocal range and stamina, and clarity of articulation. Geared toward public speaking including presentations, lectures, and job talks. May be taken in conjunction with ORALCOMM 117. ORALCOMM 115/215 was previously listed as CTL 115/215.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Freeland, T. (PI)

ORALCOMM 217: The Art of Effective Speaking (ORALCOMM 117)

The principles and practice of effective oral communication. Through formal and informal speaking activities, students develop skills framing and articulating ideas through speech. Strategies for speaking extemporaneously, preparing and delivering multimedia presentations, formulating persuasive arguments, refining critical clarity of thought, and enhancing general facility and confidence in oral self-expression. ORALCOMM 117/217 was previously listed as CTL 117/217.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Freeland, T. (PI)

ORALCOMM 219: Oral Communication for Graduate Students

(Formerly CTL 219.) Graduate student speaking activities such as teaching (delivering lectures, guiding discussion, and facilitating small groups), professional presentations and conference papers, and preparing for oral exams and defenses. In-class projects, discussion, and individual evaluation assist students in developing effective techniques for improving oral communication skills.
Last offered: Summer 2019
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