2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

271 - 280 of 381 results for: VPGE::*

MATH 355: Graduate Teaching Seminar

Required of and limited to first-year Mathematics graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

ME 206A: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 4

ME 206B: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

ME 231: Educating Young STEM Thinkers (EDUC 139, EDUC 239, ME 139)

The course introduces students to the design thinking process, the national conversations about the future of STEM careers, and opportunities to work with middle school students and K-12 teachers in STEM-based after-school activities and intercession camps. The course is both theory and practice focused. The purpose is twofold; to provide reflection and mentoring opportunities for students to learn about pathways to STEM careers and to introduce mentoring opportunities with young STEM thinkers.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | Repeatable for credit

ME 236: Tales to Design Cars By

Students learn to tell personal narratives and prototype connections between popular and historic media using the automobile. Explores the meaning and impact of personal and preserved car histories. Storytelling techniques serve to make sense of car experiences through engineering design principles and social learning, Replay memories, examine engagement and understand user interviews, to design for the mobility experience of the future. This course celebrates car fascination, and leads the student through finding and telling a car story through the REVS photographic archives, ethnographic research, interviews, and diverse individual and collaborative narrative methods-verbal, non-verbal, and film. Methods draw from socio-cognitive psychology design thinking, and fine art; applied to car storytelling. Course culminates in a final story presentation and showcase. Restricted to co-term and graduate students. Class Size limited to 18.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Karanian, B. (PI)

ME 243: Designing Emotion- for Reactive Car Interfaces

Students learn to define emotions as physiology, expression, and private experience using the automobile and shared space. Explores the meaning and impact of personal and user car experience. Reflective, narrative, and socio-cognitive techniques serve to make sense of mobility experiences; replay memories; examine engagement; understand user interviews. This course celebrates car fascination and leads the student through finding and telling the car experience through discussion, ethnographic research, interviews, and diverse individual and collaborative narrative methods-verbal, non-verbal, and in car experiences. Methods draw from socio-cognitive psychology, design thinking, and fine art, and are applied to the car or mobility experience. Course culminates in a final individual narrative presentation and group project demonstration. Class size limited to 18.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Karanian, B. (PI)

ME 301: LaunchPad:Design and Launch your Product or Service

This is an intense course in product design and development offered to graduate students only (no exceptions). In just ten weeks, we will apply principles of design thinking to the real-life challenge of imagining, prototyping, testing and iterating, building, pricing, marketing, distributing and selling your product or service. You will work hard on both sides of your brain. You will experience the joy of success and the (passing) pain of failure along the way. This course is an excellent chance to practice design thinking in a demanding, fast-paced, results-oriented group with support from faculty and industry leaders. This course may change your life. We will treat each team and idea as a real start-up, so the work will be intense. If you do not have a passionate and overwhelming urge to start a business or launch a product or service, this class will not be a fit. Refer to this website for up-to-date class and office hours information: https://www.launchpad.stanford.edu/
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

ME 311: Leading Design Teams

This class teaches students how to be an effective design team leader using the construct of a multifunction new product development (NPD) team and conceptually places students as the leader of a NPD team - the Product Manager. Topics include leadership self-awareness, a review of various leadership styles and skills in diagnosing team dynamics. The understanding and motivation of non-design engineering members of an NPD team (i.e., Sales, Marketing, Finance, HR) will be explored. Classroom activity will include interactive discussion of case studies, hands-on practice of skills, simulations, outside speakers and team presentations. Homework will include case study and source material reading, weekly reflection journals and outside research. A summary presentation and abstract-length written report of a leadership exemplar will serve as the final exam.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

ME 315: The Designer in Society

This class focuses on individuals and their psychological well being. The class delves into how students perceive themselves and their work, and how they might use design thinking to lead a more creative and committed life. As a participant you read parts of a different book each week and then engage in exercises designed to unlock learnings. In addition, there are two self-selected term project dealing with either eliminating a problem from your life or doing something you have never done before. Apply the first day during class. Attendance at first session is mandatory; otherwise, at most one absence is acceptable.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ME 368: d.Leadership: Leading Disruptive Innovation (MS&E 489)

d.Leadership is a course that teaches the coaching and leadership skills needed to drive good design process in groups. d.leaders will work on real projects driving design projects within organizations and gain real world skills as they experiment with their leadership style. Take this course if you are inspired by past design classes and want skills to lead design projects beyond Stanford. Preference given to students who have taken other Design Group or d.school classes. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints