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261 - 270 of 381 results for: VPGE::*

INDE 212: Medical Humanities and the Arts

The interdisciplinary field of medical humanities: the use of the arts and humanities to examine medicine in personal, social, and cultural contexts. Topics include the doctor/patient relationship, the patient perspective, the meaning of doctoring, and the meaning of illness. Sources include visual and performing arts, film, and literary genres such as poetry, fiction, and scholarly writing. Designed for medical students in the Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities Scholarly Concentration, but all students are welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Shafer, A. (PI)

INDE 227: Careers in Medicine: Pathways in the Medical Sciences

Open to medical students, graduate and undergraduate students. Interactive, seminar-style sessions expose students to diverse career opportunities and the challenges of developing work-life balance in medicine. Recognized experts in clinical medicine and biomedical research who have been innovators in their careers discuss their work, decision-points in their career pathways, and lifestyle aspects of their choices.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Repeatable for credit

INDE 228: Career Transition Planning: Taking Action Today for a Successful Tomorrow

Open to School of Medicine MD and graduate students; post-docs and clinical fellows may audit by consent of instructor. How to prioritize career goals and develop an effective job search campaign. Topics: translating scientific and clinical training into a variety of workplace environmennts, professional network development, professional interest assessment, recruiters' perspectives, credentials development, and creating a marketing plan. Guest speakers from myriad career fields. May be repeated for credit.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Repeatable for credit

INDE 230: Topics in Scientific Management

Designed for postdocs and advanced graduate students. Reviews management skills necessary for successfully assuming leadership roles in scientific research. Addresses some of the most difficult aspects of developing, directing, and managing people and projects and running a research group, especially issues that new faculty have traditionally learned by trial and error over a number of years. Topics include: the faculty job search process and strategies, key elements in starting a lab, basic principles regarding legal dimensions of scientific activity (intellectual property, royalties, links with industry), team science, research ethics, communication and negotiation skills, and writing and securing grants.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

INDE 234: Introduction to Writing Research Proposals

Practical instruction in research proposal writing. Suitable for advanced graduate students. Substantial writing component. Enrollment by instructor approval only.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

INDE 273: Medical Improvisation

Medicine, like theater, is both a skill set and an art form. The practice of medicine demands exceptional communicative, cognitive, and interpersonal skills in order to respond to unpredictable situations while interacting with a wide variety of individuals. Improvisational theater skills have a surprising and substantial overlap with those required of clinicians. Improv is a genre of performance art grounded in principles of spontaneity, adaptability, collaboration, and skilled listening. In this course, the principles and training techniques of improvisational theater are used to highlight and improve awareness, communication, and teamwork in the field of medicine. Limited enrollment. Class meets on five consecutive Mondays 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28 from 5:30-7:30 pm.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Nevins, A. (PI)

INTLPOL 257: Technology & Public Purpose: Practical Solutions for Innovation's Public Dilemmas

The arc of innovative progress has reached an inflection point. Technological innovation has brought immeasurable benefits to billions through improved health, productivity, and convenience. Yet as recent events have shown, unless we actively manage their risks to society, ranging from privacy concerns, to rogue AI and gene editing, to massive potential job losses, to keeping up with China and others -- new technologies may also bring unforeseen destructive consequences. We will begin with a brief history of successful and unsuccessful governance of far reaching technological changes in the past. We then turn to key technologies and the dilemmas each create, in particular: digital/social media (privacy, truth, and election interference); AI/big data (algorithmic bias, etc); the coming biotech revolution (gene editing, bio weapons); driverless cars and car-less drivers: the future of work; and the role of China and other competitors. This class is designed for advanced students in inter more »
The arc of innovative progress has reached an inflection point. Technological innovation has brought immeasurable benefits to billions through improved health, productivity, and convenience. Yet as recent events have shown, unless we actively manage their risks to society, ranging from privacy concerns, to rogue AI and gene editing, to massive potential job losses, to keeping up with China and others -- new technologies may also bring unforeseen destructive consequences. We will begin with a brief history of successful and unsuccessful governance of far reaching technological changes in the past. We then turn to key technologies and the dilemmas each create, in particular: digital/social media (privacy, truth, and election interference); AI/big data (algorithmic bias, etc); the coming biotech revolution (gene editing, bio weapons); driverless cars and car-less drivers: the future of work; and the role of China and other competitors. This class is designed for advanced students in international and public policy, or any technical discipline. The goal is to have a thoughtful exchange of ideas and you do not need prior expertise in any of these topics. We will have some fantastic guest speakers, and each class will be divided into understanding the problem, and thinking about some solutions. Enrollment will be limited to 20. You will learn to think and write like a policymaker tackling these novel concerns.
Last offered: Winter 2019

LATINAM 207: Spanish in Science/Science in Spanish (BIO 208, EARTHSYS 207)

For graduate and undergraduate students interested in the natural sciences and the Spanish language. Students will acquire the ability to communicate in Spanish using scientific language and will enhance their ability to read scientific literature written in Spanish. Emphasis on the development of science in Spanish-speaking countries or regions. Course is conducted in Spanish and intended for students pursuing degrees in the sciences, particularly disciplines such as ecology, environmental science, sustainability, resource management, anthropology, and archeology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit

LAWGEN 115N: Human Rights Advocacy

What are the origins of the human rights movement and where is it headed? What does it mean to be a human rights activist? What are the main challenges and dilemmas facing those engaged in human rights advocacy? In the space of seven decades, human rights advocates have transformed a marginal utopian ideal into a central element of global discussion, if not practice. In this seminar we will examine the actors and organizations behind this remarkable development as well as the vast challenges faced by advocates in the recent past and today. Together, we will learn to be critical of, as well as to think, and act, like human rights advocates. This seminar will introduce you to some the main debates and dilemmas within the human rights movement. We will consider and understand the differing agendas of western international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) and their counterparts in the frequently non-western) developing world, as well as tensions between and among rights advocates alon more »
What are the origins of the human rights movement and where is it headed? What does it mean to be a human rights activist? What are the main challenges and dilemmas facing those engaged in human rights advocacy? In the space of seven decades, human rights advocates have transformed a marginal utopian ideal into a central element of global discussion, if not practice. In this seminar we will examine the actors and organizations behind this remarkable development as well as the vast challenges faced by advocates in the recent past and today. Together, we will learn to be critical of, as well as to think, and act, like human rights advocates. This seminar will introduce you to some the main debates and dilemmas within the human rights movement. We will consider and understand the differing agendas of western international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) and their counterparts in the frequently non-western) developing world, as well as tensions between and among rights advocates along other important dimensions (civil and political vs. economic, social and cultural rights; rights promotion through engagement of powerful actors vs. challenging structures of power, etc.). The seminar seeks to develop your ability: 1) to understand human rights and social justice issues as contested political, legal and cultural phenomena; 2) to review advocacy texts, videos and other interventions critically; 3) to appreciate the political dimensions of efforts to promote human rights; 4) to understand how recent history constrains and structures options and possibilities for social intervention to promote rights and justice. During the course of the quarter you will be required to submit several short reflection papers and develop a human rights advocacy campaign.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

LINGUIST 394: TA Training Workshop

For second-year graduate students in Linguistics
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
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