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241 - 250 of 381 results for: VPGE::*

GSBGEN 515: Essentials of Strategic Communication

Successful leaders understand the power of authentic, memorable communication.This course uses the lens of oral communication and presentations, to introduce the essential elements of the strategic communication strategies that make authentic, memorable communication work.Focusing on oral communication and presentation, we introduce the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, message construction, communicator credibility, and delivery.Deliverables include written documents, focusing on individual and team presentations, with students receiving continuous feedback to improve their communication effectiveness, and to sharpen their authentic leadership voice. This highly interactive, practical course, is focused on feedback to help students at all levels of communication mastery develop confidence in their speaking and writing. Course includes presentations, assignments, lectures, discussions, simulated activities, in-class feedback, and filmed feedback. I more »
Successful leaders understand the power of authentic, memorable communication.This course uses the lens of oral communication and presentations, to introduce the essential elements of the strategic communication strategies that make authentic, memorable communication work.Focusing on oral communication and presentation, we introduce the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, message construction, communicator credibility, and delivery.Deliverables include written documents, focusing on individual and team presentations, with students receiving continuous feedback to improve their communication effectiveness, and to sharpen their authentic leadership voice. This highly interactive, practical course, is focused on feedback to help students at all levels of communication mastery develop confidence in their speaking and writing. Course includes presentations, assignments, lectures, discussions, simulated activities, in-class feedback, and filmed feedback. In this course you will learn to:-Recognize strategically effective communication-Implement the principles of strategic communication across different platforms-Develop clearly organized and effective presentations and documents-Diagnose and expand, your personal authentic communication styleAs you make your super round selection, keep in mind that wait lists have been long for this course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2

GSBGEN 533: Technology Licensing

Licensing of technology and its corresponding intellectual property is big business, and integral to the business plans and competitive strategies of start-ups and Fortune 500 companies alike. Although the annual dollar magnitude of licenses of patents and other technology-related IP is difficult to estimate due to the proprietary nature of much of the data, academic studies peg the U.S. IP licensing market at ~$66B, and the global market at ~$180B. The development and evolution of technology standards and interoperability requirements, regulatory overlays that require technologies outside a company¿s core competencies, the proliferation and widespread enforcement of patents, the rapid expansion of IP-based business models, and the staggering expense and uncertain benefits of internal R&D, among other things, have combined to weigh heavily on the buy side of the make/buy scale, and to amplify the importance of inbound and outbound licensing arrangements for both start-up and Fortune 50 more »
Licensing of technology and its corresponding intellectual property is big business, and integral to the business plans and competitive strategies of start-ups and Fortune 500 companies alike. Although the annual dollar magnitude of licenses of patents and other technology-related IP is difficult to estimate due to the proprietary nature of much of the data, academic studies peg the U.S. IP licensing market at ~$66B, and the global market at ~$180B. The development and evolution of technology standards and interoperability requirements, regulatory overlays that require technologies outside a company¿s core competencies, the proliferation and widespread enforcement of patents, the rapid expansion of IP-based business models, and the staggering expense and uncertain benefits of internal R&D, among other things, have combined to weigh heavily on the buy side of the make/buy scale, and to amplify the importance of inbound and outbound licensing arrangements for both start-up and Fortune 500 companies.Because licenses are complex legal agreements with important legal consequences, it is tempting for business executives to delegate to lawyers the negotiation of the non-economic terms of their companies¿ technology license agreements. The problem with such an approach, however, is that so-called ¿non-economic¿ terms can have significant and occasionally mortal economic and business consequences. While no business person should grapple with such issues in the context of a large or complex license agreement without legal counsel, it is critical that the business person understand the consequences and negotiating levers and trade-offs themselves, for at their core, the decisions to be made on these issues are business decisions, not legal ones.This course is organized around two hypothetical companies seeking to negotiate a technology license agreement. Both parties operate under a common set of ¿public¿ facts, and each responds as well to ¿private¿ facts relevant to various business priorities and issues. Students are divided into three-person teams, each representing one or the other of the hypothetical companies, and collaborate over multiple sessions to develop a strategic business approach and then to negotiate a licensing agreement. Lectures are focused on the business, and to a lesser extent, legal issues arising in complex licensing arrangements, and are designed to give students the context and perspective they need to participate effectively in licensing strategy development and negotiation. By immersing teams of business students in a multi-session licensing negotiation, it is the objective of this course to enable them to better understand and think critically about the principal issues that arise in the conceptualization and negotiation of technology license agreements.
Last offered: Spring 2017

GSBGEN 552: Winning Writing

This two-week, six-session workshop will offer techniques and practical in-class exercises for writing better -- better memos, emails, feedback for colleagues, news releases, responses to questions from the media and from interviewers, and opinion pieces. Glenn Kramon, an editor who has helped New York Times reporters win 10 Pulitzer Prizes, will teach the course along with accomplished journalists with expertise in powerful, persuasive writing for business. They will provide not only helpful tips but constructive feedback on students' work. They will also share thoughts on how best to work with the news media.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Kramon, G. (PI)

GSBGEN 565: Political Communication: How Leaders Become Leaders

Politics, perhaps like no other arena, provides a rich and dramatic laboratory for studying the art and science of influential communication. Whether it is a local school bond election or a Congressional race, a Presidential debate or a State of the Union Address, the demanding communications of politics provide insights into our own strengths and gaps as a communicator and leader. Political campaigns, by their very nature, are highly visible, oriented toward very specific objectives, and increasingly leverage a variety of new media platforms. They are often emotionally charged, and rife with conflict and drama. The principles of political communications transcend politics, and are useful guides for leaders in business, the non-profit community, as well as government. How candidates, elected officials, and leaders in all kinds of organizations communicate vision, values, and experience, as well as how they perform in very fluid environments, not the least of which may be during a crisi more »
Politics, perhaps like no other arena, provides a rich and dramatic laboratory for studying the art and science of influential communication. Whether it is a local school bond election or a Congressional race, a Presidential debate or a State of the Union Address, the demanding communications of politics provide insights into our own strengths and gaps as a communicator and leader. Political campaigns, by their very nature, are highly visible, oriented toward very specific objectives, and increasingly leverage a variety of new media platforms. They are often emotionally charged, and rife with conflict and drama. The principles of political communications transcend politics, and are useful guides for leaders in business, the non-profit community, as well as government. How candidates, elected officials, and leaders in all kinds of organizations communicate vision, values, and experience, as well as how they perform in very fluid environments, not the least of which may be during a crisis, has a great deal to do with their career success. In its ninth year, this highly interactive course allows students to explore both theory and practice behind effective positioning and presentation. Last year was a presidential election year in the United States, and was an extraordinary event in many respects. Students will analyze and evaluate both successful and unsuccessful communications strategies of political campaigns and candidates. They will explore historic examples of US Presidential debates, from Nixon/Kennedy to the present. Further they will experience political events as they happen -- like last year's campaigns -- with each class drawing lessons from political developments around the nation and the world. Students will also hone their own strategic communications skills in activities requiring both written and spoken communication. This is not a course in political science, American government, or in public speaking. However, the engaged student will gain insights into those areas as well.The course is taught by David Demarest, Vice President of Public Affairs for Stanford University. Demarest has broad communications experience across the public and private sector in financial services, education, and government. After serving as Assistant U.S. Trade Representative, and Assistant Secretary of Labor in the Reagan Administration, in 1988 he served as Communications Director for Vice President George H. W. Bush's successful presidential campaign. He then became a member of the White House senior staff as White House Communications Director. After leaving government in 1993, he spent the next decade leading communications for two Fortune 50 companies, before coming to Stanford in 2005.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Demarest, D. (PI)

GSBGEN 622: Presentation and Communication Skills for Academics

Academics must effectively communicate the importance of their research to a wide range of audiences, including colleagues, students, stakeholders, and the general public, as well as in a variety of contexts, from academic conferences and job talks to one-on-one conversations, news interviews, and social media. This highly interactive course is designed to equip PhD students with the skills to confidently present their research and connect with varied audiences. Students will craft an elevator pitch for academic settings, create a 3-min TED-like talk aimed at the general public, learn how to document and tell the ¿story¿ of their research, and practice responding to Q&A and research critiques. This class combines best practices from public speaking with elements from related fields, including the art of improv and the science of communication.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

HISTORY 305: Graduate Pedagogy Workshop

Required of first-year History Ph.D. students. Perspectives on pedagogy for historians: course design, lecturing, leading discussion, evaluation of student learning, use of technology in teaching lectures and seminars. Addressing today's classroom: sexual harassment issues, integrating diversity, designing syllabi to include students with disabilities.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Como, D. (PI)

HISTORY 306K: World History Pedagogy Workshop

Students draft a syllabus and create a curriculum module for use in a world history lecture course. Corequisite: HISTORY 306D, recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

HISTORY 336E: Humanities+Design: Visualizing the Grand Tour (CLASSICS 396, DLCL 396)

Study of the eighteenth-century Grand Tour of Italy through visualization tools of the digital age. Critical readings in both visual epistemology and current Grand Tour studies; interrogating the relationship between quantitative and qualitative approaches in digital humanities; what new insights in eighteenth-century British travel to Italy does data visualization offer us? Students will transform traditional texts and documents into digital datasets, developing individual data analysis projects using text mining, data capture and visualization techniques.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

HRP 206: Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis (CHPR 206, MED 206, STATS 211)

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

HRP 211: Law and Biosciences: Neuroscience

(Same as LAW 3006) Legal, social, and ethical issues arising from advances in neuroscience, including effects upon law and society through improvements in predicting illnesses and behaviors, reading minds through neuroimaging, understanding responsibility and consciousness, treating criminal behavior, and cognitive enhancement.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Greely, H. (PI)
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