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201 - 210 of 381 results for: VPGE::*

ENGR 202S: Directed Writing Projects

Individualized writing instruction for students working on writing projects such as dissertations, proposals, grant applications, theses, journal articles, conference papers, and teaching and research statements. Weekly one-on-one conferences with writing instructors from the Technical Communication Program. Students receive close attention to and detailed feedback on their writing. No prerequisite. Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit. This course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: McDevitt, M. (PI)

ENGR 202W: Technical Communication

This course focuses on how to write clear, concise, and organized technical writing. Through interactive presentations, group workshops, and individual conferences, students learn best practices for communicating to academic and professional audiences for a range of purposes.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3

ENGR 203: Public Speaking (ENGR 103)

Priority to Engineering students. Introduction to speaking activities, from impromptu talks to carefully rehearsed formal professional presentations. How to organize and write speeches, analyze audiences, create and use visual aids, combat nervousness, and deliver informative and persuasive speeches effectively. Weekly class practice, rehearsals in one-on-one tutorials, videotaped feedback. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Vassar, M. (PI)

ENGR 217: Expanding Engineering Limits: Culture, Diversity, and Equity (CSRE 117, CSRE 217, ENGR 117, FEMGEN 117, FEMGEN 217)

This course investigates how culture and diversity shape who becomes an engineer, what problems get solved, and the quality of designs, technology, and products. As a course community, we consider how cultural beliefs about race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, abilities, socioeconomic status, and other intersectional aspects of identity interact with beliefs about engineering, influence diversity in the field, and affect equity in engineering education and practice. We also explore how engineering cultures and environments respond to and change with individual and institutional agency. The course involves weekly presentations by scholars and engineers, readings, short writing assignments, and discussions. Class attendance is required. In Winter 2020, this course is offered only for one unit (and thus does not meet the WAY-ED (University-wide) or TiS (School of Engineering) requirements for undergraduates).
Terms: Win | Units: 1

ENGR 245: The Lean LaunchPad: Getting Your Lean Startup Off the Ground

Apply the Lean Startup principles including the Business Model Canvas, Customer Development, and Agile Engineering to prototype, test, and iterate on your idea while discovering if you have a profitable business model. This is the class adopted by the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health as the Innovation Corps. Team applications required in December. Proposals can be software, hardware, or service of any kind. Projects are experiential and require incrementally building the product while talking to 10-15 customers/partners each week. See course website http://leanlaunchpad.stanford.edu/. Prerequisite: Interest in and passion for exploring whether your technology idea can become a real company. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

ENGR 248: Principled Entrepreneurial Decisions (ENGR 148)

Examines how leaders tackle significant events that occur in high-growth entrepreneurial companies. Students prepare their minds for the difficult entrepreneurial situations that they will encounter in their lives in whatever their chosen career. Cases and guest speakers discuss not only the business rationale for the decisions taken but also how their principles affected those decisions. The teaching team brings its wealth of experience in both entrepreneurship and VC investing to the class. Previous entrepreneurship coursework or experience preferred. Limited enrollment. Admission by application: http://web.stanford.edu/class/engr248/apply.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

ENGR 277A: Engineering and Sustainable Development: Toolkit (CEE 177X, CEE 277X, ENGR 177A)

The first of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical, and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. While students must have the skills and aptitude necessary to make meaningful contributions to technical product designs, the course is open to all backgrounds and majors. The first quarter focuses on conceptual design, feasibility analysis, and implementation, evaluation, and deployment. Admission is by application. Following successful completion of CEE 177X/277X, students have the option to enroll in CEE 177S/277S Engineering & Sustainable Development: Implementation. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

ENGR 277B: Engineering and Sustainable Development (CEE 177S, CEE 277S, ENGR 177B)

The second of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. This quarter focuses on implementation, evaluation, and deployment of the designs developed in the winter quarter. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

ENGR 280: From Play to Innovation

Focus is on enhancing the innovation process with playfulness. The class will be project-based and team-centered. We will investigate the human "state of play" to reach an understanding of its principal attributes and how important it is to creative thinking. We will explore play behavior, its development, and its biological basis. We will then apply those principles through design thinking to promote innovation in the corporate world. Students will work with real-world partners on design projects with widespread application. This course requires an application. You can find the application here: dschool.stanford.edu/classes
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4

ENGR 281: d.media - Designing Media that Matters

The combination of always-on smartphones, instant access to information and global social sharing is changing behavior and shifting cultural norms. How can we design digital experiences that make this change positive? Join the d.media team and find out! This course is project-based and hands-on. Three projects will explore visual design, interaction design and behavioral design all in the context of today's technology landscape and in service of a socially positive user experience. See http://dmedia.stanford.edu, Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3
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