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11 - 20 of 23 results for: URBANST ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

URBANST 132: Concepts and Analytic Skills for the Social Sector (EARTHSYS 137)

How to develop and grow innovative not-for-profit organizations and for-profit enterprises which have the primary goal of solving social and environmental problems. Topics include organizational mission, strategy, market/user analysis, communications, funding, recruitment and impact evaluation. Perspectives from the field of social entrepreneurship, design thinking and social change organizing. Opportunities and limits of using methods from the for-profit sector to meet social goals. Focus is on integrating theory with practical applications, including several case exercises and simulations.One-day practicum where students advise an actual social impact organization. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite:consent of instructor. Email lalitvak@stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Repeatable 10 times (up to 40 units total)

URBANST 133: Social Enterprise Workshop (EARTHSYS 133)

Social Enterprise Workshop: A team based class to design solutions to social issues. In the class students will identify issues they are interested in, such as housing, food, the environment, or college access. They will join teams of like-minded students. Working under the guidance of an experienced social entrepreneur, together they will develop a solution to one part of their issue and write a business plan for that solution. The class will also feature guests who are leaders in the field of social entrepreneurship who will share their stories and help with the business plans. The business plan exercise can be used for both nonprofits and for-profits. Previous students have started successful organizations and raised significant funds based on the business plans developed in this class. There are no prerequisites, and students do not need to have an idea for a social enterprise to join the class. Enrollment limited to 20. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Scher, L. (PI)

URBANST 142: Megacities (ANTHRO 42, ARTHIST 242B, LIFE 142)

In this course we will examine the meaning, processes, and challenges of urbanization. Through a series of targeted readings across history and geography and through the study of varied means of representation (anthropology, literature, cartography, film, etc), the class will analyze the ways in which urban forms have come into being and created, met, and/or ignored challenges such as disease, water, transport, religious and class conflict, colonialism, labor, and trade. Students will read anthropology in conjunction with other disciplines (literature, urban planning, public health, architecture, and economics) to learn the ways in which ethnographies of immigration, urban poverty, class disparity, economic development and indicators, noise, and transportation substantively augment our understandings of how people live within globalization.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: McVarish, M. (PI)

URBANST 152: Building Modernity: Urban Planning and European Cities in the Twentieth Century (HISTORY 237C)

This seminar explores the history of urban planning in twentieth-century Europe. We will discuss visions of ideal cities and attempts at their implementation in the context of democratic and authoritarian systems as well as capitalism and socialism. Through case studies from eastern and western Europe--from Berlin in Germany to Nowa Huta in Poland--we will examine how broader historical trends played out in, and were shaped by, specific local circumstances. The seminar is intended for advanced undergraduate students.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Dovern, L. (PI)

URBANST 153: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, HISTORY 206E, ILAC 175, ITALIAN 175)

This course takes students on a trip to major capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Dante, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Gogol, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

URBANST 194: Internship in Urban Studies

For Urban Studies majors only. Students organize an internship in an office of a government agency, a community organization, or a private firm directly relevant to the major. Reading supplements internship. Paper summarizes internship experience and related readings.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit

URBANST 195: Special Projects in Urban Studies

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

URBANST 196: Senior Research in Public Service (EDUC 196)

Limited to seniors approved by their departments for honors thesis and admitted to the year-round Public Service Scholars Program sponsored by the Haas Center for Public Service. What standards in addition to those expected by the academy apply to research conducted as a form of public service? How can communities benefit from research? Theory and practice of research as a form of public service readings, thesis workshops, and public presentation of completed research. May be repeated for credit. Corequisite: 199.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

URBANST 197: Directed Reading

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
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