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1 - 10 of 16 results for: URBANST

URBANST 105: The Hipster and the City: Race, Ethnicity, Hip-Hop, and Gentrification in Oakland

This course introduce undergraduate students to the theory and methods of thengeospatial history (and humanities), understood broadly as the application of GISntechniques and other quantitative methods in the humanistic study of social and culturalnpatterns in past and recent settings.n! Specifically, the movement of Black population from small towns and plantationsnpre-civil war to the Urban Cities (after the Civil War) to the metropolis (The GreatnMigration) to the present day Black Lives Matter) as been studied by historians usingntraditional methodology. However, these disciplines are becoming outmoded, becausena technology has taken its place.n! Using social media and Arc GIS software (Omega and Neatline),and other spatialntheory and learning technical methodologies, Google Street view, and Taggingncollectives to recover and retrace social movements from Greensboro Sit in, to thenBerkeley Student uprisings of the late 1960s to the Hashtag revolution of Black LivesnMatter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Brown, C. (PI)

URBANST 110: Utopia and Reality: Introduction to Urban Studies

Designed for freshmen and sophomores. Introduction to the study of cities and urban civilization focusing on the utopias that have been produced over time to guide and inspire city-dwellers to improve and perfect their urban environments. History of urbanization and the urban planning theories inspired by Ebenezer Howard, Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, the New Urbanists and Smart Growth advocates that address current issues such as urban community dynamics, suburbanization, sustainability, and globalization. Public policy approaches designed to address these issues and utopian visions of what cities could be, or should be, in the future. Topic of the final paper chosen by the student, with consent of instructor, and may be a historical research paper, a policy-advocacy paper, or a proposal for an urban utopia that addresses the challenges and possibilities of urban life today.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

URBANST 114: Urban Culture in Global Perspective (ANTHRO 126)

Core course for Urban Studies majors. We will study urban space both historically and cross-culturally. Urban Studies, by definition, is an interdisciplinary field, where the methodological approaches draw upon a diverse set of analytic tools. Disciplines that occupy a prominent place in this class are geography, cultural anthropology, sociology, history, media studies, and literature. In this context, we will discuss the importance of cities around the world to the economic, cultural, and political well-being of modern societies and examine how forces such as industrialization, decentralization, and globalization affect the structure and function of cities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

URBANST 131: VIP: Very Impactful People - Social Innovation & the Social Entrepreneur

Invited lecture series. Perspectives and endeavors of entrepreneurs and thought leaders who address social needs in the U.S. and internationally through private, for-profit and nonprofit organizations or public institutions. The lecture and Q&A is from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., followed by an optional discussion period with the speaker including dinner.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Litvak, L. (PI)

URBANST 133: Social Entrepreneurship Collaboratory (EARTHSYS 133)

Interdisciplinary student teams create and develop U.S. and international social entrepreneurship initiatives. Proposed initiatives may be new entities, or innovative projects, partnerships, and/or strategies impacting existing organizations and social issues in the U.S. and internationally. Focus is on each team¿s research and on planning documents to further project development. Project development varies with the quarter and the skill set of each team, but should include: issue and needs identification; market research; design and development of an innovative and feasible solution; and drafting of planning documents. In advanced cases, solicitation of funding and implementation of a pilot project. Enrollment limited to 20. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Scher, L. (PI)

URBANST 145: International Urbanization Seminar: Cross-Cultural Collaboration for Sustainable Urban Development (CEE 126, EARTHSYS 138, IPS 274)

Comparative approach to sustainable cities, with focus on international practices and applicability to China. Tradeoffs regarding land use, infrastructure, energy and water, and the need to balance economic vitality, environmental quality, cultural heritage, and social equity. Student teams collaborate with Chinese faculty and students partners to support urban sustainability projects. Limited enrollment via application; see internationalurbanization.org for details. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor(s).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

URBANST 168: Housing & Community Development--Policy and Practice (PUBLPOL 158)

How federal, state and local governments have worked with private and nonprofit sector actors in creating housing, as well as downtown, waterfront and neighborhood development. Legal and financial mechanisms, tax policy, reuse of historic structures, affordable shelter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Gale, D. (PI)

URBANST 169: California's Minority-Majority Cities (CSRE 260, HISTORY 260)

Historical development and the social, cultural, and political issues that characterize large cities and suburbs where communities of color make up majority populations. Case studies include cities in Los Angeles, Santa Clara, and Monterey counties. Comparisons to minority-majority cities elsewhere in the U.S. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: McKibben, C. (PI)

URBANST 174: Defining Smart Cities: Visions of Urbanism for the 21st Century (CEE 125, CEE 225)

In a rapidly urbanizing world, "the city" paves the way toward sustainability and social well-being. But what does it mean for a city to be smart? Does that also make it sustainable or resilient or livable? This seminar delves into current debates about urbanism through weekly talks by experts on topics such as big data, human-centered design, new urbanism, and natural capital. How urban spaces are shaped, for better or worse, by the complex interaction of cutting-edge technology, human societies, and the natural environment. The goal is to provoke vigorous discussion and to foster an understanding of cities that is at once technological, humanistic, and ecologically sound.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2

URBANST 187: Housing Justice Research Lab (CSRE 99)

In this course, students will contribute to ongoing community-based research projects focused on housing justice in the Bay Area. Students will work directly with local community organizations working in advocacy, legal aid, and community research. Projects may include interviews, historical research, surveys, case studies, participant observation, media analysis, and writing op-eds. Students will have the opportunity to select from research projects developed by the community partners and instructors. Students that want to engage in an alternative project should consult with the instructors. Students are encouraged to enroll for multiple quarters to develop more substantial projects and deeper relationships with community partners.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3
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