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1 - 4 of 4 results for: THINK 50

PHIL 180: Metaphysics (PHIL 280)

This course is a survey of the philosophy of time and modality, as organized around the following central issue. There are two competing ways to think about time. On one conception, time is space-like. Just as space consists in a three-dimensional spatial manifold, time forms a one-dimensional temporal manifold. On another conception, time is modality-like, and should be understood on analogy with notions like possibility and necessity. Topics covered include the nature of time, time¿s passage, spacetime and relativity, modal realism, actualism, and powers-based theories of modality. Although modal logic and temporal logic will be introduced in the class, an independent background in logic is crucial. Students should have taken (i) PHIL 49/50 or a higher-level logic course and (ii) a writing-intensive philosophy course such as PHIL 80.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 280: Metaphysics (PHIL 180)

This course is a survey of the philosophy of time and modality, as organized around the following central issue. There are two competing ways to think about time. On one conception, time is space-like. Just as space consists in a three-dimensional spatial manifold, time forms a one-dimensional temporal manifold. On another conception, time is modality-like, and should be understood on analogy with notions like possibility and necessity. Topics covered include the nature of time, time¿s passage, spacetime and relativity, modal realism, actualism, and powers-based theories of modality. Although modal logic and temporal logic will be introduced in the class, an independent background in logic is crucial. Students should have taken (i) PHIL 49/50 or a higher-level logic course and (ii) a writing-intensive philosophy course such as PHIL 80.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wang, J. (PI)

STRAMGT 110Q: Making Sense of Strategy

Get the strategy right, and the chance for success is great. Nowhere is this more evident than in today's world of major challenges. Strategy is at the heart of problem solving and achieving objectives, yet few people can define strategy, much less understand how to conceptualize, design, and execute effective strategies that yield the best outcomes.This course will meet once a week to focus on interesting and engaging case studies, each of which illustrates a key ingredient of strategy. Some are well-known historical events, while others are less obvious, but all have a strategic lesson to share. They are quite diverse, from the planning of a high-risk rescue in the Colorado Rockies, to a product crisis in a Fortune 50 company, to a little-known failed military mission of WWII, to a commercial airline disaster. The ability to think through challenging and varied scenarios is both instructive and mind-stretching. There will be some pre-reading on each case study and there may be a field trip for students to put their lessons into practice. The course is designed to be highly interactive; all to enable students to unravel the mystery and power of strategic thinking. Students will also have the opportunity to select and analyze a case reflecting interests of their own. This course can help students not only prepare for a career in a range of fields, but also as they meet the challenges of their current coursework. Problem-solving skills are central in every walk of life; this seminar can help students build a stronger foundation for sound decision-making.
Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Demarest, D. (PI)

THINK 50: Empathy

This course will introduce freshmen to a range of ways of thinking about empathy. How do we know and understand the other? How does knowledge of another's experience and circumstances enable us to make moral decisions and take moral actions? It will take students on an intellectual investigation of the topic of empathy from the Buddhist emphasis on compassion in the fifth century BCE to Jesus' teaching of parables in the first century CE to Enlightenment philosophy to Silicon Valley¿s adoption of empathy in the twenty-first century. The main focus will be on the modern period (from the 18th to 20th century) and students will be asked to approach different genres of text through the lens of empathy. The course will culminate with a one-week creative workshop on the question of empathy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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