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11 - 20 of 27 results for: SYMSYS

SYMSYS 201: Digital Technology, Society, and Democracy

The impact of information and communication technologies on social and political life. Interdisciplinary. Classic and contemporary readings focusing on topics such as social networks, virtual versus face-to-face communication, the public sphere, voting technology, and collaborative production. Prerequisite: Completion of a course in psychology, communication, human-computer interaction, or a related discipline, or consent of the instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Davies, T. (PI)

SYMSYS 203: Cognitive Science Perspectives on Humanity and Well-Being

In recent years, cognitive scientists have turned more attention to questions that have traditionally been investigated bynhistorians, political scientists, sociologists, and anthropologists, e.g. What are the sources of conflict and disagreement betweennpeople?, What drives or reduces violence and injustice?, and What brings about or is conducive to peace and justice? In this advancednsmall seminar, we will read and discuss works by psychologists, neuroscientists, philosophers, and others, which characterize thisngrowing research area among those who study minds, brains, and behavior.nRequired: Completion of a course in psychology beyond the level of Psych 1, or consent of the instructor.
Last offered: Spring 2019

SYMSYS 207: Conceptual Issues in Cognitive Science

This seminar will cover a selection of foundational issues in cognitive science. Topics may include modularity, representation, connectionism, neuroscience and free will, neuroimaging, implants, sensory experience, the nature of information, and consciousness. Course is limited to 15 students. Prerequisite: Phil 80, or permission of the instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

SYMSYS 208: Computer Machines and Intelligence

It has become common for us to see in the media news about computer winning a masters in chess, or answering questions on the Jeopardy TV show, or the impact of AI on health, transportation, education, in the labor market and even as an existential threat to mankind. This interest in AI gives rise questions such as: Is it possible for a computer to think? What is thought? Are we computers? Could machines feel emotions or be conscious? Curiously, there is no single, universally accepted definition of Artificial Intelligence. However in view of the rapid dissemination of AI these questions are important not only for experts, but also for all other members of society. This course is intended for students from different majors Interested in learn how the concept of intelligent machine is understood by the researchers in AI. We will study the evolution of AI research, its different approaches, with focus on the tests developed to verify if a machine is intelligent or not. In addition, we wi more »
It has become common for us to see in the media news about computer winning a masters in chess, or answering questions on the Jeopardy TV show, or the impact of AI on health, transportation, education, in the labor market and even as an existential threat to mankind. This interest in AI gives rise questions such as: Is it possible for a computer to think? What is thought? Are we computers? Could machines feel emotions or be conscious? Curiously, there is no single, universally accepted definition of Artificial Intelligence. However in view of the rapid dissemination of AI these questions are important not only for experts, but also for all other members of society. This course is intended for students from different majors Interested in learn how the concept of intelligent machine is understood by the researchers in AI. We will study the evolution of AI research, its different approaches, with focus on the tests developed to verify if a machine is intelligent or not. In addition, we will examine the philosophical problems associated with the concept of intelligent machine. The topics covered will include: Turing test, symbolic AI, connectionist AI, sub- symbolic Ai, Strong AI and Weak AI, Ai singularity, unconventional computing, rationality, intentionality, representation, machine learning, and the possibility of conscious machines.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

SYMSYS 212: Challenges for Language Systems (SYMSYS 112)

Parallel exploration of philosophical and computational approaches to modeling the construction of linguistic meaning. In philosophy of language: lexical sense extension, figurative speech, the semantics/pragmatics interface, contextualism debates. In CS: natural language understanding, from formal compositional models of knowledge representation to statistical and deep learning approaches. We will develop an appreciation of the complexities of language understanding and communication; this will inform discussion of the broader prospects for Artificial Intelligence. Special attention will be paid to epistemological questions on the nature of linguistic explanation, and the relationship between theory and practice. PREREQUISITES: PHIL80; some exposure to philosophy of language and/or computational language processing is recommended.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

SYMSYS 245: Cognition in Interaction Design

Note: Same course as 145 which is no longer active. Interactive systems from the standpoint of human cognition. Topics include skill acquisition, complex learning, reasoning, language, perception, methods in usability testing, special computational techniques such as intelligent and adaptive interfaces, and design for people with cognitive disabilities. Students conduct analyses of real world problems of their own choosing and redesign/analyze a project of an interactive system. Limited enrollment seminar taught in two sections of approximately ten students each. Admission to the course is by application to the instructor, with preference given to Symbolic Systems students of advanced standing. Recommended: a course in cognitive psychology or cognitive anthropology.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Shrager, J. (PI)

SYMSYS 255: Building Digital History: Informatics of Social Movements and Protest

A participatory course focused on the online representation of oral and archival history research. This year's thematic focus is the design and evaluation of history websites focused on social movements and protest. We will survey the field of digital history and its application to social movement research and teaching. The course will utilize materials developed in the 2014 version of the course, which focused on the history of student activism at Stanford. Class will apply lessons from digital history practice and theory to the design of an online repository and community for the collaborative representation and discussion of social movement history at Stanford, and to the further development of source material in a future version of the class. Topics will include participatory design, studies of historical learning, archiving issues, data integrity, and fair representation of different viewpoints, among others.
Last offered: Spring 2016

SYMSYS 255A: Building Digital History: Social Movements and Protest at Stanford

Lectures-only version of Symsys 255.
Last offered: Spring 2016

SYMSYS 271: Group Democracy

This seminar will explore theoretical, empirical, and practical approaches to groups that come together around a common purpose or interest. Emphasis is on democratically structured, non-hierarchical and non-institutional decision making, e.g. by grassroots activists, student, or neighborhood organizations. Parliamentary, consensus, and informal procedures. How do groups form? How do they deliberate and make decision? What are the principles underlying different models for group process, and how well do different procedures work in practice? How do culture and identity affect the working of a group? And how are social technologies used? Readings from different disciplines and perspectives. Course is limited to 20 students. Prerequisite: A course in social psychology, decision making or group sociology. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

SYMSYS 275: Collective Behavior and Distributed Intelligence (BIO 175)

This course will explore possibilities for student research projects based on presentations of faculty research. We will cover a broad range of topics within the general area of collective behavior, both natural and artificial. Students will build on faculty presentations to develop proposals for future projects.
Last offered: Spring 2018
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