2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 14 results for: STS

STS 1: The Public Life of Science and Technology

The course focuses on key social, cultural, and values issues raised by contemporary scientific and technological developments through the STS interdisciplinary lens by developing and applying skills in three areas: (a) The historical analysis of contemporary global matters (e.g., spread of technologies; climate change response); (b) The bioethical reasoning around health issues (e.g., disease management; privacy rights); and (c) The sociological study of knowledge (e.g., intellectual property, science publishing). A discussion section is required and will be assigned the first week of class.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

STS 123: Making of a Nuclear World: History, Politics, and Culture

Nuclear technology has shaped our world through its various applications (e.g., weapons, energy production, medicine) and accidents and disasters (e.g., Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, Fukushima). This course will examine the development of nuclear technology and its consequences to politics and culture at the global, national, regional and local levels from interdisciplinary perspectives. Some of the key questions addressed are: How did different countries and communities experience and respond to the 1945 bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki? How did such experiences affect the later development of the technology in different national contexts? How have nuclear tests and disasters change the ways in which risks are understood and managed globally and locally? What kinds of political activism, international arrangements, and cultural tropes and imageries emerged in response to nuclear technology? We explore these questions through key works and recent studies in history, anthropology, sociology, and science and technology studies, as well as through films and literature.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4

STS 186: Innovation and Entrepreneurship: A Triple Helix of University Industry Government Interactions

This seminar examines the origins, growth and risks of Knowledge-based ecosystems. Is Silicon Valley sustainable and replicable? Where is 1960's Boston Route 128 innovation hub today? Are the Golden Triangle (Oxford, Cambridge, London) Moscow's Skolkovo; North Carolina's Research Triangle; France's Sophia Antipolis and other wannabe Silicon Landscapes viable? What is the role of Civil Society, gender balance and diversity, the arts and sciences: natural and social in innovation policy and practice? Innovation in innovation is the invention of organizational formats that facilitate product, process and social innovation. Start-ups and spin-offs, the Entrepreneurial University and Public Venture Capital and have been innovation drivers but are they sufficient? Can debt funded R&D sustain innovation? We will study the Stanford Innovation System and publish our results.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

STS 190: Issues in Technology and the Environment

Humans have long shaped and reshaped the natural world with technologies. Once a menacing presence to conquer or an infinite reserve for resources, nature is now understood to require constant protection from damage and loss. This course will examine humanity's varied relationship with the environment, with a focus on the role of technology. Topics include: industrialization, modernism, nuclear technology, and biotechnology. Students will explore theoretical and methodological approaches in STS and conduct original research that addresses this human-nature-technology nexus.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

STS 191: Introduction to Research in STS

This seminar introduces key analytical approaches and methodologies in STS, as well as basic tools for conducting original research in STS. Students survey a series of influential empirical studies; identify productive questions of their own interest; and explore how to pursue them through strong research design. Research proposal as final assignment. Preference to STS juniors; others require consent of instructor. The final proposal can serve as an honors prospectus for students who seek to participate in the STS honors program.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Sato, K. (PI)

STS 199: Independent Study

Every unit of credit is understood to represent three hours of work per week per term and is to be agreed upon between the student and the faculty member. Instructor consent required. Please contact the department for a permission number.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

STS 199A: Curricular Practical Training

Students obtain internship in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree program and area of concentration. Prior to enrolling students must get internship approved by the STS Program Director. At the end of the quarter, a one-page final report must be supplied documenting work done and relevance to degree program. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. Student is responsible for arranging own internship. Limited to declared STS majors only. Course may be repeated twice. Instructor consent required. Please contact the department for a permission number.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

STS 199J: Editing a Science Technology and Society Journal

The Science Technology and Society (STS) Program has a student journal, Intersect, that has been publishing STS student papers for a number of years. This course involves learning about how to serve as an editor of a peer-reviewed journal, while serving as one of the listed editors of Intersect. Entirely operated online, the journal uses a work-flow management to help with the submission process, peer-review, editing, and publication. Student editors learn by being involved in the publishing process, from soliciting manuscripts to publishing the journal's annual issue, while working in consultation with the instructor. Students will also learn about current practices and institutional frameworks around open access and digital publishing.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

STS 200A: Food and Society: Politics, Culture and Technology

This course will examine how politics, culture, and technology intersect in our food practices. Through a survey of academic, journalistic, and artistic works on food and eating, the course will explore a set of key analytical frameworks and conceptual tools in STS, such as the politics of technology, classification and identity, and nature/culture boundaries. The topics covered include: the industrialization of agriculture; technology and the modes of eating (e.g., the rise of restaurants); food taboos; globalization and local foodways; food and environmentalism; and new technologies in production (e.g., genetically modified food). Through food as a window, the course intends to achieve two broad intellectual goals. First, students will explore various theoretical and methodological approaches in STS. In particular, they will pay particular attention to the ways in which politics, culture, and technology intersect in food practices. Second, student will develop a set of basic skills and tools for their own critical thinking and empirical research, and design and conduct independent research on a topic related to food. First class attendance mandatory. STS majors must have Senior status to enroll in this Senior Capstone course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

STS 200D: Top Ten Textnologies

This course will explore in detail ten of the most successful and long-lived technologies of human communication over the course of ten weeks. We'll examine the Rosetta Stone, Crazy Horse Mountain, the Voynich Manuscript, Banksy's Graffiti, Jackson Pollock's Lucifer, The London Illustrated News, Rihanna's `Work', the IPad, GoogleVR, and a nickel. We shall create biographies of these textual objects to better understand their effectiveness, the intentionality behind their creation and production, their affordances and functionality in the real world. Students will learn to describe and evaluate the major physical attributes and concepts that essentially underpin all forms of human communication. They'll then use this knowledge to replicate, augment, and reform current and historical text technologies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Treharne, E. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints