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41 - 50 of 72 results for: STRAMGT

STRAMGT 504: Innovation and Non-founder CEOs

This course examines how companies innovate after the success of their first product, and why non-founder led companies are often less successful at this than founder led companies. We focus on how non-founder CEOs can drive more innovation while managing risk and potential failure. Our emphasis will be primarily on lessons that can be applied to technology companies, although many are relevant to other industries. Our goal is to help develop successful non-founder CEOs.
Last offered: Winter 2019

STRAMGT 509: Strategies of Effective Product Management

This is a course about exploring the methods and processes for product management, largely in technology companies, and a look at what can lead to the most effective ways to coordinate customer needs, ensure accurate product development, and how to develop and use the appropriate tools needed to successfully sell products and services to customers from the perspective of the Product Manager. The course covers ways to think about product management depending on the type of product being delivered (new product introduction vs. reinvigorating an existing product) and also the skills and tools used by product managers for effective product management.
Last offered: Winter 2017

STRAMGT 510: Conversations in Management

This case-based course is offered for students who want to refine their ability to manage challenging professional conversations. The class, which is limited to 32 students, will focus on the preparation for and execution of role-played dialogue as well as on postmortem analysis. Most of the respondent roles will be external to one's company, and some will be front line or mid-level people with limited educational credentials. Broad utilization will be made of background readings plus visiting case protagonists and experts. There will be nine class sessions, each of one hour and forty-five minutes.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2

STRAMGT 511: Protecting Ideas

Today, the assets of many businesses are largely intangible, such as brands, data, software and trade secrets. More and more we live in an economy based on intangibles and much of business involves creating, exploiting and managing those intangible assets. Intellectual property rights (patents, trade secrets, copyright, trademarks design rights and so on) and data rights are a set of legal rights and assets that establish ownership of and protect tangible and intangible assets from copying and other acts-for example copying of software or counterfeiting of designer handbags. Equally, intellectual property in the hands of third parties may pose a risk to a business developing a new product or brand. Most businesses start with an idea. It is critical to understand when and under what circumstances ideas, creative works and technology can be protected from third party use by intellectual property, and what limits apply to that protection. It is equally critical to recognize what must be d more »
Today, the assets of many businesses are largely intangible, such as brands, data, software and trade secrets. More and more we live in an economy based on intangibles and much of business involves creating, exploiting and managing those intangible assets. Intellectual property rights (patents, trade secrets, copyright, trademarks design rights and so on) and data rights are a set of legal rights and assets that establish ownership of and protect tangible and intangible assets from copying and other acts-for example copying of software or counterfeiting of designer handbags. Equally, intellectual property in the hands of third parties may pose a risk to a business developing a new product or brand. Most businesses start with an idea. It is critical to understand when and under what circumstances ideas, creative works and technology can be protected from third party use by intellectual property, and what limits apply to that protection. It is equally critical to recognize what must be done to secure ownership. In this course you will learn about IP rights-what they are, what they do, their limitations and how they are useful from a strategic perspective-well beyond the typical idea of a patent being nothing more than an invitation to a messy and expensive lawsuit. We will also discuss the all-too-common mistakes that can frustrate these objectives. To put these issues into a business setting, we will be joined by experienced business executives and investors in markets ranging from biosciences to software to sound engineering. The format of this course will be lecture, first by the teaching faculty and then by the guest speakers, with engaged, real-time Q&A for both. Guest speakers will share their experiences in the area of IP investment, management, deployment, strategy and risk. This course is designed for business students, not law students. It is the objective of this course to help business students to think critically about when and how to invest in intellectual property protection, to recognize its limits, and to avoid the common mistakes that can frustrate such investments and undermine the value of the company. Although we will have to introduce you to legal concepts, the focus of the course is on putting these concepts into a business setting and explaining how IP may be used strategically-enabling you to be part of the conversation with legal and intellectual property experts and to consider how IP can support management of the assets and strategy of a business or other enterprise. No prior knowledge or experience with intellectual property is needed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Johnson, S. (PI)

STRAMGT 512: The Yin and Yang of Family Business Transitions

This seminar provides students with practical solutions to some of the challenges faced in family business transitions.Family businesses are by far the dominant form of commerce world-wide, albeit the majority are small "mom and pop shops." Some research shows that large businesses, whatever the form of ownership, have an average lifespan of around forty years, while small businesses (at least in Japan and Europe) average around twelve years. So, if businesses in general do not survive, then it is a wonder that any family business can survive from one generation to another, let alone two, three, four or more.There are three essential requirements to succeed in a family business transition. First, it may seem obvious that the business must succeed, but it is less obvious what advantages a family business has over its non-family-owned counterparts. Second, the ownership structure must effectively maintain family cohesion and support the business. Finally, family members need to organize more »
This seminar provides students with practical solutions to some of the challenges faced in family business transitions.Family businesses are by far the dominant form of commerce world-wide, albeit the majority are small "mom and pop shops." Some research shows that large businesses, whatever the form of ownership, have an average lifespan of around forty years, while small businesses (at least in Japan and Europe) average around twelve years. So, if businesses in general do not survive, then it is a wonder that any family business can survive from one generation to another, let alone two, three, four or more.There are three essential requirements to succeed in a family business transition. First, it may seem obvious that the business must succeed, but it is less obvious what advantages a family business has over its non-family-owned counterparts. Second, the ownership structure must effectively maintain family cohesion and support the business. Finally, family members need to organize in thoughtful ways to work effectively with one another.The beauty of a family business is that it can be more profitable than companies with non-family ownership. Two fundamentals, at least, provide this advantage - a strong value system and a long-term economic perspective. The operative word above, however, is "can"; it is by no means a foregone conclusion that a family business will be more successful. Families must thoughtfully develop their advantages, while at the same time avoiding the pitfalls that are inherent in any family business.Accordingly, this course is offered for students whose families own a family business or who are interested in the special challenges faced by family businesses. International students are encouraged to register as different cultural perspectives to family business will enrich the experience for everyone. Particular focus will be given to the transitions from one generation to another and the lessons learned that can be applied during the entire life of the business.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Francis, P. (PI)

STRAMGT 516: Fundamentals of Effective Selling

This course looks at the entire selling process of prospecting, qualification, discovery, customization, objection handling, relationship building, and closing. Our primary objective is to offer a hands-on, skills-based class in which students work together in groups to practice the fundamentals of effective selling. Over the six sessions of this compressed course, we will focus on the following aspects of effective selling: creating a value-based prospecting script; meeting objections with curiosity (rather than argument); using advanced questioning to qualify prospects and understand the problems, impacts, ideals and benefits of potential customers; creating customized presentations that map your solution to your customer's needs; using interaction to promote customer engagement; accelerating the process of building trust and developing relationships; and overcoming the limiting beliefs associated with closing deals and obtaining commitments from customers. By the end of the course, more »
This course looks at the entire selling process of prospecting, qualification, discovery, customization, objection handling, relationship building, and closing. Our primary objective is to offer a hands-on, skills-based class in which students work together in groups to practice the fundamentals of effective selling. Over the six sessions of this compressed course, we will focus on the following aspects of effective selling: creating a value-based prospecting script; meeting objections with curiosity (rather than argument); using advanced questioning to qualify prospects and understand the problems, impacts, ideals and benefits of potential customers; creating customized presentations that map your solution to your customer's needs; using interaction to promote customer engagement; accelerating the process of building trust and developing relationships; and overcoming the limiting beliefs associated with closing deals and obtaining commitments from customers. By the end of the course, you will not only have more confidence, but also a sales toolkit that you will be able to customize and deploy when you encounter selling situations in the future. The course is appropriate for anyone who wants to understand and become more proficient with the skills required in different selling situations. Our experience suggests that students who have a particular selling context in mind - such as a new product to sell - will benefit from this course, but this is not required. If you want to feel more confident in both traditional and non-traditional selling situations - like pitching to an investor or selling yourself in a job interview - this course will be helpful.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

STRAMGT 518: Advertising and Monetization

Advances in advertising technology, such as online publishing, digital and mobile advertising platforms, as well as new ways of consuming video content are driving a rapid evolution of the advertising market. We analyze this evolution from the perspective of three main constituents: 1) Marketers who rely on advertising to launch and sustain product sales, 2) Publishers and media owners for whom advertising often represents the largest source of monetization, and 3) Advertising agencies who design, plan and buy media for advertising campaigns. We will review challenges and opportunities from each of the three perspectives, including challenges in measurement for advertisers as well as forces that make it hard for small and medium sized publishers to monetize solely through advertising. Guest speakers provide a perspective on current trends and technologies.
Last offered: Winter 2018

STRAMGT 519: Equity By Design: Building Diverse and Inclusive Organizations

This course equips you to create, build and lead equitable organizations. We will learn the power of iD&I - that is, how we can be change agents by involving key stakeholders, casting the right vision, and constructing the right interactions to unlock the true potential of diversity in teams and organizations. We will discuss the power of inclusion as itrelates to the employee and customer experience. We will study effective strategies for designing diverse and inclusive companies, and will address the barriers and myths related to meritocracy. We'll look at approaches to organizational design that limit unconscious bias and produce more objective decisions across the employee experience - from engaging and hiring candidates to retaining employees and helping them thrive. We'll dive into how to create inclusive cultures and a sense of belonging. Finally, we will learn tools and techniques to empower change for ourselves and others. Experts in diversity and inclusion, and executives at companies that have successfully incorporated inclusion programs, will join us for the class discussions.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2

STRAMGT 520: The Industrialist's Dilemma

This course explores how digital disruptions are having tectonic shifts on large, successful and established companies, whether they have a digital foundation or not. Both new and existing high technology firms such as Google, Amazon, Stripe, Airbnb and others are reshaping industries as disparate as life sciences and transportation. The management principles, competitive strategies, partnerships, and core competencies of the 20th century are being challenged in a world of bits and the global network in which all companies are forced to compete. In this course we will explore some of the fundamental technological changes impacting these industries, such as scaling assets without owning them, partnerships with digital leaders and new distribution strategies for goods and services. We will hear from executives of both leading Fortune 500 companies and new disruptors about what it takes to survive and thrive in this new digital economy.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

STRAMGT 524: Longevity: Business Implications and Opportunities

People age 50 and over account for over 50% of consumer spending in the US and 83% of household wealth, with both number expected to increase significantly due to a combination of increased longevity and the aging of the baby boomer generation. It is the largest and one of the fastest growing business opportunities US and worldwide. Many business managers and entrepreneurs, however, do not consider the over 50 demographic in their plans, and those that do often do not understand how best to design products and services for this group. It is a huge missed opportunity. This class will explore how managers and entrepreneurs should consider the older population in their strategies, in product and service design, in managing their work force, and in their own careers. Class topics will include: - The over age 50 opportunity and how it will grow over the coming years - The map of life and segmenting the older population - Considerations for developing products and services that are multi-gen more »
People age 50 and over account for over 50% of consumer spending in the US and 83% of household wealth, with both number expected to increase significantly due to a combination of increased longevity and the aging of the baby boomer generation. It is the largest and one of the fastest growing business opportunities US and worldwide. Many business managers and entrepreneurs, however, do not consider the over 50 demographic in their plans, and those that do often do not understand how best to design products and services for this group. It is a huge missed opportunity. This class will explore how managers and entrepreneurs should consider the older population in their strategies, in product and service design, in managing their work force, and in their own careers. Class topics will include: - The over age 50 opportunity and how it will grow over the coming years - The map of life and segmenting the older population - Considerations for developing products and services that are multi-generational and appealing to older consumers - New business opportunities created by the growth in the over 50 population, social trends, and technology n - Managing older workers -Career considerations in a world where individuals live longer and healthier lives. The course would be two units offered Winter quarter, and would be taught using a mix of new cases developed for the class, guest speakers (some in conjunction with cases), and lectures.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
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