2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

21 - 30 of 72 results for: STRAMGT

STRAMGT 330: Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital: Partnership for Growth

This 3 unit course is designed for students interested in early-stage investing, venture capital, and/or entrepreneurship. The course content and projects are designed to be complementary to the dozens of great GSB courses about entrepreneurship such as Start-up Garage, Entrepreneurial Finance, Formation of New Ventures and Lean Launchpad. Our course, S330 -- Entrepreneurship & Venture Capital; Partnership for Growth, is one of a handful of GSB courses that delivers the investor's and entrepreneurs' viewpoint in a very candid format. The course takes the student on a journey divided into 3 different segments (investor strategies, current issues that affect your start-up, and best practices as you build your company). We have carefully selected 5 relevant topics for each segment. In the first segment of the course, we invite 5 different investors to illustrate the range of investor strategies as well as their differences in how they select their next big investment opportunity. These in more »
This 3 unit course is designed for students interested in early-stage investing, venture capital, and/or entrepreneurship. The course content and projects are designed to be complementary to the dozens of great GSB courses about entrepreneurship such as Start-up Garage, Entrepreneurial Finance, Formation of New Ventures and Lean Launchpad. Our course, S330 -- Entrepreneurship & Venture Capital; Partnership for Growth, is one of a handful of GSB courses that delivers the investor's and entrepreneurs' viewpoint in a very candid format. The course takes the student on a journey divided into 3 different segments (investor strategies, current issues that affect your start-up, and best practices as you build your company). We have carefully selected 5 relevant topics for each segment. In the first segment of the course, we invite 5 different investors to illustrate the range of investor strategies as well as their differences in how they select their next big investment opportunity. These investors represent Funds who are leaders in each of their specialties, such as Floodgate, Founder's Fund and the venture debt firm, WTI. The second segment of the course highlights 5 current issues that affect entrepreneurs as they launch their idea in this rapidly changing investor environment. These topics range from how to build an effective board to why there are not more women in VC to the consequences of 'too much money' in the VC ecosystem. The third segment of the course covers 5 tactical steps that are important to entrepreneurs as they build their company. We begin with how co-founders split their founder equity and then hear Mike Maples reflect on best practices for idea formation and scaling. We conclude with trade-offs in negotiating that first term sheet. Please see the syllabus for more specifics about course content and the business idea project. nThe majority of the classes are case-based, where the guest speakers (who are often the case protagonists) discuss how the issues in each case are relevant to today's start-up. We encourage challenging and meaningful class discussion to take the guests 'off-script' and focus on sharing the 'street smarts' of the entrepreneur and investor community. The course attracts students from many different backgrounds - those who are experienced entrepreneurs to those students who are experimenting with the idea of entrepreneurship for the first time. We also see students with significant investment experience share their start-up experience as they add to the class dynamic.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

STRAMGT 335: Entrepreneurial Approaches to Education Reform

In this course, students will investigate opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurial ventures trying to make a positive impact in public education. The course requires a basic level of understanding of the U.S. K-12 public school system. The first session will analyze the structure of the public education as an industry, with a special emphasis on understanding the achievement gap. Subsequent sessions will explore challenges in increasing efficacy, ensuring financial sustainability, and scaling for entrepreneurs who have sought to change student outcomes, solve pain points, and innovate. The course will feature a variety of ventures (including schools, education technology, training, and supplemental services) and organizational models (for-profit, not-for-profit, and benefit corporation). This course is suitable for students aspiring to be entrepreneurs, leaders in entrepreneurial organizations, leaders in educational organizations, Board members, donors or investors. (Note: this is not a "how-to" course on starting an entrepreneurial venture.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Lee, G. (PI)

STRAMGT 340: POWer: Building the Entrepreneurial Mindset from the Perspective of Women

This seminar will showcase women entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. We will explore the challenges and opportunities they encountered in starting and growing their ventures, and the personal and professional choices they have made. The sessions will include cases, readings, videos, panel discussions, role plays and breakout groups with the entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. The class will help you understand and build your entrepreneurial and growth mindset. You will leave the class with an individual roadmap and tools to help you be entrepreneurial throughout your career. Men are encouraged to enroll.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

STRAMGT 345: Taking Social Innovation to Scale

How do you get the best new social innovations to reach the hundreds of millions of people who need it the most? And how do ensure that they are developed, deployed and scaled in a way that is relevant, appropriate and sustainable? Innovators tackling the world's most difficult problems often ignore, misunderstand, and under-invest in the critical business challenges involved in crossing "the middle of the value chain." This is innovation's valley of death: product and system adaption and evaluation; evidence generation and design validation; business and partnership planning; formal or informal regulatory approval and registration. How do you design, introduce, and optimize the intervention's uptake before it can be taken to scale by markets, governments or other systems? The class is taught be Steve Davis, President & CEO of PATH ( www.path.org), a leader in global health innovation, and former global Director of Social Innovation at McKinsey & Company.We take an inter-disciplinary a more »
How do you get the best new social innovations to reach the hundreds of millions of people who need it the most? And how do ensure that they are developed, deployed and scaled in a way that is relevant, appropriate and sustainable? Innovators tackling the world's most difficult problems often ignore, misunderstand, and under-invest in the critical business challenges involved in crossing "the middle of the value chain." This is innovation's valley of death: product and system adaption and evaluation; evidence generation and design validation; business and partnership planning; formal or informal regulatory approval and registration. How do you design, introduce, and optimize the intervention's uptake before it can be taken to scale by markets, governments or other systems? The class is taught be Steve Davis, President & CEO of PATH ( www.path.org), a leader in global health innovation, and former global Director of Social Innovation at McKinsey & Company.We take an inter-disciplinary approach to look at the factors that pull innovation forward, push it from behind, and (often to the world's detriment) block its successful implementation and scaling. First grounding the discussion in research on innovation and social change, we then apply business principles, real world experiences and several important case studies in global health to examine the way good ideas get stuck, and how good ideas can turn into innovation that matters. We focus on root causes for failure, success factors, and business practices and tools to enable millions of lives to be impacted by social innovation. The seminar combines lectures, case studies, visiting practitioners and team projects focused on the business case for scaling specific social innovations. The goal is to help the next generation of social innovation leaders think more about some of the mistakes of the past, lessons for the future, and new ways of approaching old problems, all from a practitioner's point of view.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Davis, S. (PI)

STRAMGT 350: Global Value Chain Strategies

This course addresses how the increasingly large number of firms that use or provide outsourcing and "offshoring" can create a sustainable competitive advantage. Students who complete the course will have a framework and a set of concepts that can be used to position a firm for strategic advantage in these supply networks. Positioning in and strategic analysis of product markets is covered in a variety of courses and books. A distinguishing feature of this course is that it addresses positioning and strategic analysis for firms operating as part of a network of providers, sellers and buyers... the factor markets. The course takes a general management perspective and provides examples through cases and discussions with visitors. The major theme of the course is that these firms must carefully consider how they position themselves in both the product and factor markets.
Last offered: Spring 2017

STRAMGT 351: Building and Managing Professional Sales Organizations

The focus of this class is on the challenges and key issues associated with the creation and management of a professional sales organization. Our emphasis is developing and managing the selling effort of business-to-business and business-to-consumer capital goods and services. There will be relatively little emphasis on sales technique (i.e., students should not expect a course on "How to be a Better Salesperson"). The course is organized to follow the development of the sales function from strategic inception through to execution and implementation: choosing a go-to-market model (e.g., direct sales, no/low touch, VARs, OEMs, hybrid models); building and structuring the sales organization (e.g., sales learning curve, organizational structure, allocating territories and quotas); and managing the sales force (e.g., hiring/firing, compensation, forecasting, culture). We will address these topics in the context of both early stage ventures and later stage enterprises.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4

STRAMGT 353: Entrepreneurship: Formation of New Ventures

This course is offered for students who at some time may want to undertake an entrepreneurial career by pursuing opportunities leading to partial or full ownership and control of a business. The course deals with case situations from the point of view of the entrepreneur/manager rather than the passive investor. Many cases involve visitors, since the premise is that opportunity and action have large idiosyncratic components. Students must assess opportunity and action in light of the perceived capabilities of the individuals and the nature of the environments they face. The course is integrative and will allow students to apply many facets of their business school education. Each section will have a specific focus.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4

STRAMGT 354: Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital

Many of America's most successful entrepreneurial companies have been substantially influenced by professionally managed venture capital. This relationship is examined from both the entrepreneur's and the venture capitalist's perspective. From the point of view of the entrepreneur, the course considers how significant business opportunities are identified, planned, and built into real companies; how resources are matched with opportunity; and how, within this framework, entrepreneurs seek capital and other assistance from venture capitalists or other sources. From the point of view of the venture capitalist, the course considers how potential entrepreneurial investments are evaluated, valued, structured, and enhanced; how different venture capital strategies are deployed; and how venture capitalists raise and manage their own funds. The course includes a term-long project where students work in teams (4-5 students per team) to write a business plan (or a business model canvas) for a venture of the team's choosing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

STRAMGT 355: Managing Growing Enterprises

This course is offered for students who, in the near term, aspire to the management and full or partial ownership of a new or newly-acquired business. The seminar, which is limited to 45 students, has a strong implementation focus, and deals in some depth with certain selected, generic entrepreneurial issues, viewed from the perspective of the owner/manager. Broad utilization is made of case materials, background readings, visiting experts, and role playing. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the application of analytical tools to administrative practice.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4

STRAMGT 356: The Startup Garage: Design

Startup Garage is an intensive hands-on, project-based course, in which students will apply the concepts of design thinking, engineering, finance, business and organizational skills to design and test new business concepts that address real world needs . Our aspiration is to help teams identify an unmet customer need, design new products or services that meet that need, and develop business models to support the creation and launch of startup products or services. Even those teams that do not successfully launch a venture, or individuals who decide not to move forward, will learn critical, cutting-edge techniques about starting and launching a venture. Collaborative, multi-disciplinary teams will identify and work with users, domain experts, and industry participants to identify and deeply understand customer needs, then proceed to design products or services and a business model to address those needs. Each team will conceive, design, build, and field-test critical aspects of both the more »
Startup Garage is an intensive hands-on, project-based course, in which students will apply the concepts of design thinking, engineering, finance, business and organizational skills to design and test new business concepts that address real world needs . Our aspiration is to help teams identify an unmet customer need, design new products or services that meet that need, and develop business models to support the creation and launch of startup products or services. Even those teams that do not successfully launch a venture, or individuals who decide not to move forward, will learn critical, cutting-edge techniques about starting and launching a venture. Collaborative, multi-disciplinary teams will identify and work with users, domain experts, and industry participants to identify and deeply understand customer needs, then proceed to design products or services and a business model to address those needs. Each team will conceive, design, build, and field-test critical aspects of both the product or service and the business model. This course is offered by the Graduate School of Business. It integrates methods from human-centered design, lean startup, and business model planning. The course focuses on developing entrepreneurial skills (using short lectures and in-class exercises) and then applying these skills to specific problems faced by those users identified by the teams. Teams will get out of the building and interact directly with users and advisers to develop a deep understanding of the challenges they face and to field test their proposed services, products, and business models.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints