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11 - 20 of 70 results for: STRAMGT

STRAMGT 315: From Launch to Liquidity

This course considers the challenges faced by start-ups in achieving liquidity. We take the perspectives of organizational behavior, marketing, and finance, and examine forks in the road faced by firms that have already launched products. Marketing topics include how to market firms for sale and calculating the addressable market. Organizational topics include hiring and firing, and the role of founders after sales. Finance topics include how the choice between sale and IPO affects value realized, and private equity exits.
Last offered: Winter 2016

STRAMGT 316: Fundamentals of Effective Selling

The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to the fundamentals of how to sell and to what selling is truly about. The course is appropriate for anyone who wants to understand and show proficiency with the skills required by different selling situations (e.g., direct sales of products and services, selling oneself in an interview, raising money for a new venture, running a company as CEO, etc.). The course looks at the entire selling process of lead generation, prospecting, qualification, discovery, understanding value, customizing presentations, objection handling, negotiation and closing. This is not a typical GSB case-study-based course. Students who have taken the class describe it as a hands-on, practical, skills-based class. Students will work by themselves and together in groups to complete individual and team-based exercises designed to introduce them to and give them practice with selling fundamentals in each stage of the selling process. Students will be pra more »
The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to the fundamentals of how to sell and to what selling is truly about. The course is appropriate for anyone who wants to understand and show proficiency with the skills required by different selling situations (e.g., direct sales of products and services, selling oneself in an interview, raising money for a new venture, running a company as CEO, etc.). The course looks at the entire selling process of lead generation, prospecting, qualification, discovery, understanding value, customizing presentations, objection handling, negotiation and closing. This is not a typical GSB case-study-based course. Students who have taken the class describe it as a hands-on, practical, skills-based class. Students will work by themselves and together in groups to complete individual and team-based exercises designed to introduce them to and give them practice with selling fundamentals in each stage of the selling process. Students will be practicing and utilizing newly learned skills in real life each week; the focus will be on doing stuff (e.g., using curiosity in a situation outside the classroom) rather than thinking about and talking about stuff. Students will then come together in class with the instructors to share and process the learning from these exercises.nn
Last offered: Autumn 2015

STRAMGT 319: Equity By Design: Building Diverse and Inclusive Organizations

This course equips you to create and build equitable organizations. We will discuss the power of inclusion as it relates to the employee and customer experience. We will study effective strategies for building diverse and inclusive companies, and will address the barriers that can often exist. We'll look at approaches to organizational design that limit unconscious bias and produce more objective decisions across the employee experience - from engaging and hiring candidates to retaining employees and helping them thrive. Finally, we'll dive into how to create inclusive cultures and a sense of belonging. Experts in diversity and inclusion, and executives at companies that have successfully incorporated inclusion programs, will join us for the class discussions.
Last offered: Spring 2019

STRAMGT 321: Create a New Venture: From Idea to Launch I

S321/S322 is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from Idea to Launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students from within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued, e.g. engineering, CS or medicine. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two-quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, test and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter, they will further test, refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. more »
S321/S322 is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from Idea to Launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students from within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued, e.g. engineering, CS or medicine. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two-quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, test and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter, they will further test, refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present their plan to a panel of experts and potential investors to simulate the funding process. The course builds on important research, successes, and findings as they relate to the process of new venture creation. The teaching method is through a structured process of relevant mini-lectures, exercises and active in-depth team learning by doing (LBD). Extensive field research and prototype product development are integral to the course. Learning is further enhanced through meetings with the instructor, coaching by their assigned experienced mentors, experts, and review by peers. Informal student meetings/mixers will be held in the autumn quarter to further facilitate the formation of teams and assist in idea generation. The application process for S321/322,¿Create A New Venture: from Idea to Launch¿ is described on the course website.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Rohan, D. (PI)

STRAMGT 322: Create a New Venture: From Idea to Launch II

S321/S322 is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from Idea to Launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students from within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued, e.g. engineering, CS or medicine. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two-quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, test and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter, they will further test, refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. more »
S321/S322 is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from Idea to Launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students from within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued, e.g. engineering, CS or medicine. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two-quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, test and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter, they will further test, refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present their plan to a panel of experts and potential investors to simulate the funding process. The course builds on important research, successes, and findings as they relate to the process of new venture creation. The teaching method is through a structured process of relevant mini-lectures, exercises and active in-depth team learning by doing (LBD). Extensive field research and prototype product development are integral to the course. Learning is further enhanced through meetings with the instructor, coaching by their assigned experienced mentors, experts, and review by peers. Informal student meetings/mixers will be held in the autumn quarter to further facilitate the formation of teams and assist in idea generation. The application process for S321/322,¿Create A New Venture: from Idea to Launch¿ is described on the course website.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Rohan, D. (PI)

STRAMGT 323: Organizational Psychology of Design Thinking

We'd like to introduce you to Samantha Palmer, a recent Stanford graduate who took several classes at the d.school. Each class further confirmed the importance of the design thinking process, methodology, and community. By the end of her Stanford career she truly believed that design thinking had the potential to change her life.n nAs graduation approached, Samantha found a position at a large tech company in Silicon Valley and was excited to bring the design thinking methodologies with her. A few weeks into her new job, she asked her team if they wanted to talk to some users before launching into their next big project. She was met with a room of blank stares and apprehensive questions. n nHow might we give Samantha the skills she needs to change the mindset of her colleagues, spark design thinking at her company, and get her first design-driven project off the ground? n nWhen you take a class at the d.school, you walk away confident in your creative skills and fluent in the design pr more »
We'd like to introduce you to Samantha Palmer, a recent Stanford graduate who took several classes at the d.school. Each class further confirmed the importance of the design thinking process, methodology, and community. By the end of her Stanford career she truly believed that design thinking had the potential to change her life.n nAs graduation approached, Samantha found a position at a large tech company in Silicon Valley and was excited to bring the design thinking methodologies with her. A few weeks into her new job, she asked her team if they wanted to talk to some users before launching into their next big project. She was met with a room of blank stares and apprehensive questions. n nHow might we give Samantha the skills she needs to change the mindset of her colleagues, spark design thinking at her company, and get her first design-driven project off the ground? n nWhen you take a class at the d.school, you walk away confident in your creative skills and fluent in the design process. However, when recent graduates (re)enter the workforce, they quickly become discouraged by the stagnancy of company cultures. They see the need to trigger and sustain change, but don¿t have the understanding of organizational psychology to do so. Organizational Psychology of Design Thinking asks you to take on Samantha¿s challenges. n nOver the course of the semester, students will engage in 2 large-scale projects:n- Project 1 (Empathy - Synthesis) - Working with partner companies, students will apply organizational psychology and design frameworks to better understand company culture.n- Project 2 (Ideation - Testing) - Using their work from Project 1, students will prototype and test organizational changes in real company settings.nn**Please note** Our class will take an experimental approach Organizational Psychology of Design Thinking. The majority of classes will be conducted in the field allowing students to take a hands-on approach to design thinking. Please be aware and build travel time into your class schedule.
Last offered: Spring 2016

STRAMGT 325: Formation of Impact Ventures

This class is for students who want to start, invest in, or take a senior position in a social impact venture. For the purposes of this class, a social impact venture is an organization (both for profits and non-profits) whose primary mission is to provide a sustainable solution to a social problem. The class covers venture creation and development, resource acquisition, and managing growth in the context of impact ventures. The class deals with situations from the perspectives of both the entrepreneur and investor. Students will have a chance to assess opportunity and action in the context of current impact ventures. The course is integrative and will allow students to apply many facets of their business school education. We will have a mix of case discussions, lectures, student-led in-class exercises, and guest speakers. The final project involves engagement with an emerging impact venture and its management. The instructors, Laura Hattendorf and Russell Siegelman, are active, early stage impact investors.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

STRAMGT 328: Social Ventures Practicum

The Social Ventures Practicum is an experiential learning course for student teams actively working to launch a social venture (nonprofit or for-profit or tbd). SVP is often a useful follow-on for social venture start-up teams after product/service ideation courses such as STRAMGT 356: Startup Garage, the Design for Extreme Affordability sequence, or other startup/design thinking. In all cases, this course will focus on the additional elements of business planning needed to launch your venture successfully. Students who are beginning with a less-developed product/service idea for a social venture but are interested in taking this course are encouraged to reach out to the instructors, who will try to match them with existing teams. Other students who wish to take SVP to learn about social ventures but do not have a product/service idea similarly should reach out to instructors to see if they can be matched.In weekly sessions throughout the quarter, teams will work through topics unique more »
The Social Ventures Practicum is an experiential learning course for student teams actively working to launch a social venture (nonprofit or for-profit or tbd). SVP is often a useful follow-on for social venture start-up teams after product/service ideation courses such as STRAMGT 356: Startup Garage, the Design for Extreme Affordability sequence, or other startup/design thinking. In all cases, this course will focus on the additional elements of business planning needed to launch your venture successfully. Students who are beginning with a less-developed product/service idea for a social venture but are interested in taking this course are encouraged to reach out to the instructors, who will try to match them with existing teams. Other students who wish to take SVP to learn about social ventures but do not have a product/service idea similarly should reach out to instructors to see if they can be matched.In weekly sessions throughout the quarter, teams will work through topics unique to social ventures (e.g. mission, theory of change, impact measurement) as well as topics common to any venture, (e.g. product/service market fit, business/economic model, financial planning, early-stage financing, logistics, sales/distribution, and board/talent development). Each team will receive significant one-on-one coaching from the instructors, as well as opportunities to share their work with peers and learn from/present to guest speakers.
Last offered: Spring 2019

STRAMGT 330: Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital: Partnership for Growth

This 3 unit course is designed for students interested in early-stage investing, venture capital, and/or entrepreneurship. The course content and projects are designed to be complementary to the dozens of great GSB courses about entrepreneurship such as Start-up Garage, Entrepreneurial Finance, Formation of New Ventures and Lean Launchpad. Our course, S330 -- Entrepreneurship & Venture Capital; Partnership for Growth, is one of a handful of GSB courses that delivers the investor¿s and entrepreneurs¿ viewpoint in a very candid format. The course takes the student on a journey divided into 3 different segments (investor strategies, current issues that affect your start-up, and best practices as you build your company). We have carefully selected 5 relevant topics for each segment. In the first segment of the course, we invite 5 different investors to illustrate the range of investor strategies as well as their differences in how they select their next big investment opportunity. These in more »
This 3 unit course is designed for students interested in early-stage investing, venture capital, and/or entrepreneurship. The course content and projects are designed to be complementary to the dozens of great GSB courses about entrepreneurship such as Start-up Garage, Entrepreneurial Finance, Formation of New Ventures and Lean Launchpad. Our course, S330 -- Entrepreneurship & Venture Capital; Partnership for Growth, is one of a handful of GSB courses that delivers the investor¿s and entrepreneurs¿ viewpoint in a very candid format. The course takes the student on a journey divided into 3 different segments (investor strategies, current issues that affect your start-up, and best practices as you build your company). We have carefully selected 5 relevant topics for each segment. In the first segment of the course, we invite 5 different investors to illustrate the range of investor strategies as well as their differences in how they select their next big investment opportunity. These investors represent Funds who are leaders in each of their specialties, such as Floodgate, Founder¿s Fund and the venture debt firm, WTI. The second segment of the course highlights 5 current issues that affect entrepreneurs as they launch their idea in this rapidly changing investor environment. These topics range from how to build an effective board to why there are not more women in VC to the consequences of `too much money¿ in the VC ecosystem. The third segment of the course covers 5 tactical steps that are important to entrepreneurs as they build their company. We begin with how co-founders split their founder equity and then hear Mike Maples reflect on best practices for idea formation and scaling. We conclude with trade-offs in negotiating that first term sheet. Please see the syllabus for more specifics about course content and the business idea project. nThe majority of the classes are case-based, where the guest speakers (who are often the case protagonists) discuss how the issues in each case are relevant to today¿s start-up. We encourage challenging and meaningful class discussion to take the guests `off-script¿ and focus on sharing the `street smarts¿ of the entrepreneur and investor community. The course attracts students from many different backgrounds ¿ those who are experienced entrepreneurs to those students who are experimenting with the idea of entrepreneurship for the first time. We also see students with significant investment experience share their start-up experience as they add to the class dynamic.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

STRAMGT 335: Entrepreneurial Approaches to Education Reform

In this course, students will investigate opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurial ventures trying to make a positive impact in public education. The course requires a basic level of understanding of the U.S. K-12 public school system. The first session will analyze the structure of the public education as an industry, with a special emphasis on understanding the achievement gap. Subsequent sessions will explore challenges in increasing efficacy, ensuring financial sustainability, and scaling for entrepreneurs who have sought to change student outcomes, solve pain points, and innovate. The course will feature a variety of ventures (including schools, education technology, training, and supplemental services) and organizational models (for-profit, not-for-profit, and benefit corporation). This course is suitable for students aspiring to be entrepreneurs, leaders in entrepreneurial organizations, leaders in educational organizations, Board members, donors or investors. (Note: this is not a "how-to" course on starting an entrepreneurial venture.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Lee, G. (PI)
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