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1 - 10 of 18 results for: SOMGEN ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

SOMGEN 120: Compassion, Dignity and Empathy-Physician Communication Skills (SOMGEN 220)

As medical technology advances, research shows the human touch and the provider-patient interaction retains a critical role in the practice of medicine. This class uses fun and novel techniques to enhance communication skills and build empathy with others. Beyond clinical communication skills, we will learn how to be better communicators of complex medical and scientific skills with broader audiences, including the media. The class will meet with physicians who use social media to improve health literacy and with journalists who transform data into compelling stories about health and medicine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

SOMGEN 130: Sexual Diversity and Function Across Medical Disciplines

Focus is on the development of personal and professional skills to address medical and health issues related to human sexuality across a broad and diverse range of ages, gender, sexual orientation, sexual practices, and sexual function. Guest lectures will cover sexual issues from multiple medical disciplines and health perspectives of children (pediatric), adolescents, and young, middle-aged and older (geriatric) adults (geriatric). Consideration of sociocultural (predominantly U.S) norms is explored, including religious values and taboos, and sexual practices ranging from ¿stereotypically normal¿ to asexuality, celibacy, polyamory, and kink, etc. Emphasis is given to medical issues, e.g. the impact of specific medications, hormonal therapies, medical procedures, disabilities such as spinal cord injury, and treatments on sexual function and other issues that one might encounter in a general or specialty medical setting. Each week will include an 80-minute (Tuesday) class with a pair o more »
Focus is on the development of personal and professional skills to address medical and health issues related to human sexuality across a broad and diverse range of ages, gender, sexual orientation, sexual practices, and sexual function. Guest lectures will cover sexual issues from multiple medical disciplines and health perspectives of children (pediatric), adolescents, and young, middle-aged and older (geriatric) adults (geriatric). Consideration of sociocultural (predominantly U.S) norms is explored, including religious values and taboos, and sexual practices ranging from ¿stereotypically normal¿ to asexuality, celibacy, polyamory, and kink, etc. Emphasis is given to medical issues, e.g. the impact of specific medications, hormonal therapies, medical procedures, disabilities such as spinal cord injury, and treatments on sexual function and other issues that one might encounter in a general or specialty medical setting. Each week will include an 80-minute (Tuesday) class with a pair of related lectures, lecture, or video followed by class discussion, or student presentations, and a 50-minute ¿Queer Medicine¿ (Thursday) class organized by a Stanford Medical student, with overall direction by Marcia Stefanick, Professor of Medicine (SCRP, Ob/Gyn) Director of the Stanford Women¿s Health and Sex Differences in Medicine (WSDM, ¿wisdom¿) Center.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOMGEN 150Q: Challenging Sex and Gender Dichotomies in Biology and Medicine

This course explores and challenges the physiological basis for distinguishing human "males" and "females", expands the concepts of "intersex" beyond reproductive anatomy/physiology (i.e. beyond the genitalia), and discusses some known consequences of "gender biases" in medical diagnoses and treatments. The influence of gender (sociocultural) "norms", i.e. gendered behaviors and relations, on human biology is juxtaposed with the role of biological traits on the construction of gender identity, roles and relationships, thereby focusing on the interactions of sex and gender on health and medical outcomes. Problems that may arise by labeling conditions that vary in incidence, prevalence and/or severity across the "male-female" spectrum as "men's" or "women's" health issues will be discussed. In addition, the importance of recognizing the spectrum of sex and gender, as well as sexual orientation, in clinical practice from pediatric to geriatric populations, will be highlighted, with consideration of varying perspectives within different race/ethnic, religious, political, and other groups.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOMGEN 203: Literature and Writing for Military Affiliated Students

Who gets to tell a war story? Everyone who is affected by war. So everyone. This class will explore short readings of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction written by veterans or influenced by conflict. We will discuss the importance of war writing as a medium of expression for veterans, a means of understanding and reconciliation for civilians, and the ways it has impacted culture as a whole. The work will include short reading assignments, in-class writing prompts and guest speaker(s), such as General Jim Mattis, veteran writer Hugh Martin and others. There will be a final 1,500-word project.No writing experience required or expected.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable 8 times (up to 8 units total)
Instructors: Genovese, J. (PI)

SOMGEN 206: Global Medical Issues Affecting Women (FEMGEN 206)

This course discusses a number of key medical issues affecting women (and girls) around the world. Through primarily guest lectures, students will become acquainted with many critical challenges to women¿s health globally, and how these may be addressed efficiently, cost-effectively, and sustainably. The aim is to cultivate a nuanced appreciation of women¿s unique needs, roles, and challenges in the contemporary global health landscape.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2

SOMGEN 207: Theories of Change in Global Health (INTLPOL 291)

Organizations dedicated to improving global health deploy various approaches ranging from efforts to improve economic conditions, health systems, and technology to policy change and advocacy. This course critically evaluates 15 common theories of change that underlay global health interventions. Students will review and discuss examples of both success and failure of each theory of change drawn from journal articles from various disciplines. This seminar is appropriate for graduate students of any discipline who are interested in considering the range of approaches and their likely utility when considering a specific global health problem in a particular location. Upper-class undergraduates who have completed at least one of the prerequisite courses ( ECON 118, CEE 265D, HUMBIO 129S or HUMBIO 124C) and who are willing to commit the preparatory time are welcome. Sign up for 3 unit credits to participate in the seminar or 4 units to participate in the seminar and complete a project.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Luby, S. (PI)

SOMGEN 213: The Art of Observation: Enhancing Clinical Skills Through Visual Analysis

Offers medical students the opportunity to enhance their observational and descriptive abilities by analyzing works of art in the Stanford museums. Working with the Cantor Arts Center staff and Stanford Art History PhD candidates, students spend time in each session actively looking at and describing works in the gallery. Discussion with medical school faculty follows, providing a clinical correlate to the gallery session. Classes interrogate a different theme of medical observation and clinical practice and includes opportunities for an applied clinical session in the hospital with course-affiliated physicians.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

SOMGEN 215: Biosocial Medicine: The Social, Psychological, and Biological Determinants of Behavior and Wellbeing (EDUC 205, HUMBIO 65)

Explores how social forces, psychological influences, and biological systems combine to affect human behavior in early childhood, in the educational experience, and throughout the life course. Examines how behaviors are linked to well-being. Uses a flipped classroom model, in which a series of lectures are available for students to view on-line before class. In-class time then focuses on case studies from published research. Students must enroll in HUMBIO 65 for a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Barr, D. (PI)

SOMGEN 219A: Introduction to Medical Education

Will teaching be an important part of your professional career? What knowledge and skills are necessary to become an outstanding medical educator? This seminar will use interactive and small group instruction to review core principles of medical education. Students will explore learning theory, bedside and clinical teaching techniques, feedback, curriculum design, assessment, education research methods, technology and career paths in medical education.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit (up to 99 units total)

SOMGEN 219B: Advances in Medical Education

This seminar is intended for students who are interested in a career in health professions education. Completion of ¿Introduction to Medical Education¿ ( SOMGEN219, Winter Q) is recommended but not required. We will use didactic and small group instruction to examine several advanced topics in medical education: individualized learning, competency-based assessment, coaching in medical education, applied learning theory, disseminating educational scholarship, and the creation of digital learning resources. We hope that this course will inspire students to enter academic careers that include teaching as a central tenet of their life¿s work.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2
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