2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

81 - 90 of 307 results for: SOC

SOC 136: Sociology of Law (SOC 236)

(Graduate students register for 236) This course explores major issues and debates in the sociology of law. Topics include historical perspectives on the origins of law; rationality and legal sanctions; normative decision making and morality; cognitive decision making; crime and deviance, with particular attention to the problem of mass incarceration; the "law in action" versus the "law on the books;" organizational responses to law, particularly in the context of sexual harassment and discrimination in education and employment; the roles of lawyers, judges, and juries; and law and social change with particular emphasis on the American civil rights movement. Special Instructions: Students are expected to attend a weekly TA-led discussion section in addition to lecture. Sections will be scheduled after the start of term at times when all students can attend. Paper requirements are flexible. Cross listed with the Law School ( LAW 7511). See "Special Instructions" in course description above. Elements Used in Grading: Class participation, paper proposal, three short papers and a final paper (see syllabus for details).
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 136A: Law and Society (SOC 236A)

Law and social inequality. Major sociological perspectives on where the law comes from, what law and justice systems do, and how they work.

SOC 136B: Advanced Topics in Sociology of Law (SOC 236B)

(Same as LAW 538.) Historical perspectives on the origins of law, rationality and legal sanctions, law on the books versus the law in action, crime and deviance, school desegregation, privitization of prisons, American civil rights, file sharing, jury decision making, the role of lawyers and judges, and cynicism about the American legal system.
Last offered: Winter 2010

SOC 137: Global Inequality

Absolute world poverty has declined considerably in the last twenty years, but elites have gained disproportionately from the growth of the global economy, leading to serious concerns about inequality in several countries, as well as in global policy circles. This discussion-based seminar explores how global capitalism affects worldwide inequality. Topics include the evolution, causes, and structure of global inequality, the links between inequality and human development, and potential solutions to global inequality.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

SOC 139: American Indians in Contemporary Society (NATIVEAM 139, SOC 239)

(Graduate students register for 239.) The social position of American Indians in contemporary American society, 1890 to the present. The demographic resurgence of American Indians, changes in social and economic status, ethnic identification and political mobilization, and institutions such as tribal governments and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Recommended: 138 or a course in American history.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul

SOC 140: Introduction to Social Stratification (SOC 240)

(Graduate students register for 240.) The main classical and modern explanations of the causes of social, economic, and political inequality. Issues include: power; processes that create and maintain inequality; the central axes of inequality in contemporary societies (race, ethnicity, class, and gender); the consequences of inequality for individuals and groups; and how social policy can mitigate and exacerbate inequality. Cases include technologically simple groups, the Indian caste system, and the modern U.S.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOC 141P: Public Interest Tech: Case Studies (SOC 241P)

What does public interest technology look like in practice? Each week, a guest speaker will present a case study of their work to improve government and public systems through innovative methods, data-driven efforts, emerging technology, and human-centered design. Students will reflect on the practicalities, ethics, and best practices of public interest technology work.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1

SOC 142: Sociology of Gender (FEMGEN 142, FEMGEN 242, SOC 242)

The aim of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the sociological conceptualization of gender. Through the sociological lens, gender is not an individual attribute or a role, but rather a system of social practices that constructs two different categories of people men and women and organizes social interaction and inequality around this difference. First we will explore what ¿gender¿ is according to sociologists and the current state of gender inequality in the labor market, at home, and at school. We will then investigate how gender structures our everyday lives through the individual, interactional, and institutional levels. Finally, we will discuss avenues for reducing gender inequality. Throughout the course, we will prioritize reading, evaluating, and questioning sociological theory and research on gender."
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOC 143: Sociology of the Middle Class

This class focuses on understanding of how social research is conducted, and gaining the ability to evaluate the quality ofnempirical research. The course will focus on the process of designing a research project, including: formulating research questions, developing hypotheses, developing valid and reliable measures, deciding on the types of data needed, making decisions on sampling, choosing research design and data collection methods, the challenges of making causal inferences, and criteria for evaluating the quality of social research.

SOC 144: Inequality and the Workplace (SOC 244)

How characteristics of workplaces, such as hiring practices, workforce diversity, organizational policies and legal mandates, produce variation in inequality. Examines the sources, extent, and consequences of workplace inequality across gender, racial and ethnic lines. Topics include earnings, social status, geographical location, and opportunities for people in the workforce.
Last offered: Autumn 2009
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints