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71 - 80 of 315 results for: SOC

SOC 127: Bargaining, Power, and Influence in Social Interaction (SOC 227)

(Graduate students register for 227.) Research and theoretical work on bargaining, social influence, and issues of power and justice in social settings such as teams, work groups, and organizations. Theoretical approaches to the exercise of power and influence in social groups and related issues in social interaction such as the promotion of cooperation, effects of competition and conflict, negotiation, and intergroup relations. Enrollment limited to 40.
Last offered: Autumn 2006 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 127D: Gender At Work: Understanding Gender Inequality in the Workplace

Recent events have directed attention to the vastly different workplace experiences individuals encounter based on their gender. But just how does gender structure employment outcomes and experiences? This course will examine the ways in which gender comes to be embedded in organizations and conceptions of work and skill, as well as how gender interacts with other identities, like race, class, and sexuality, to create inequality in the workplace. We will discuss the role of discrimination, bias, and harassment as well as occupational segregation and devaluation in producing unequal outcomes among people of diverse genders. By the end of this course, students will be able to think critically about how gender impacts labor market outcomes as well as develop their own ideas for spaces for further research as well as intervention.
Last offered: Summer 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOC 128: Introduction to Social Network Analysis (SOC 228)

(Graduate students register for SOC 228.) Theory and methods of network analysis in sociology (with an emphasis on social movements), anthropology, history, social psychology, economics, political science, and public health. Prerequisite: basic mathematics.
Last offered: Autumn 2010

SOC 129X: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 112, EDUC 212, SOC 229X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED

SOC 130: Education and Society (EDUC 120C, EDUC 220C, SOC 230)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 132J: Sociology of Jewishness (CSRE 132J, JEWISHST 132D)

Examines the place of the Jewish people in society throughout various locales and historical periods to understand how interactions among Jews and with other groups have shaped Jewish identities. Topics include modernism, the Holocaust, Israel/nationhood, race/ethnicity, intermarriage, and assimilation. Uses theoretical, empirical, and historical material from multiple social scientific fields of study and explores the study of Judaism from several major sociological lenses.
Last offered: Spring 2015

SOC 133: Law and Wikinomics: The Economic and Social Organization of the Legal Profession (SOC 333)

(Graduate and Law students enroll in 333.) Seminar. Emphasis is on the labor market for large-firm lawyers, including the market for entry-level lawyers, attorney retention and promotion practices, lateral hiring of partners, and increased use of forms of employment such as the non-equity form of partnership. Race and gender discrimination and occupational segregation; market-based pressure tactics for organizational reform. Students groups collect and analyze data about the profession and its markets. Multimedia tools for analysis and for producing workplace reforms. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | Repeatable for credit

SOC 133A: Building and Leading Inclusive Organizations (SOC 233A)

This course takes a problem-solving focus. Our main goal is to learn to design research-based interventions to improve diversity, equity and inclusion outcomes in organizations. U.S. society has become increasingly more diverse, and yet our organizations do not reflect that diversity. Further, even successful efforts to improve diversity are often not accompanied by a plan to create truly inclusive organizations that support a diverse workforce or student body. We will begin by comparing explanations for the lack of diversity and inclusion in modern organizations. We will then examine research that illustrates the cost to individuals and organizations for failing to leverage the diverse talent in our society. Guest speakers will share their challenges and successes in increasing diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in the organizations where they work. Then, it will be your turn. Working in teams you will design your own research-based intervention to promote DEI at the organizational, team, and individual level and present your intervention to the class. Along the way, you will also learn effective strategies for navigating non-inclusive organizations and for being an effective change agent in your own environment.

SOC 133D: Globalization and Social Change

How do we make sense of a world that is becoming increasingly interconnected, and where social problems like climate change, democratization, human rights, and economic stability are increasingly global in their scope? How have international institutions attempted to regulate these processes and maintain social order? Why have recent social and political movements in an increasing number of countries targeted globalization as a source of their society¿s problems? In this course, we will explore how globalization is as an economic, political, and cultural process that shapes major social problems in today¿s world. To do so, we will draw on a range of theories and interdisciplinary research in economics, political science, and sociology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Furuta, J. (PI)

SOC 134: Gender and Education in Global and Comparative Perspectives (EDUC 197, FEMGEN 297)

This course introduces students to theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to an understanding of the role of education in relation to structures of gender differentiation, hierarchy, and power. It familiarizes students with and enables them to critically evaluate research on the status of children, adolescents, and young adults around the world and their participation patterns in various sectors of society, particularly in education. Students have the opportunity to gain research skills by designing research proposals or to develop action plans on topics of their choosing related to gender and education from global and/or comparative perspectives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wotipka, C. (PI)
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