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61 - 70 of 308 results for: SOC

SOC 124: Gender and Technology

Gender and Technology historicizes the process through which technical skills and modern-day American computing technologies have been imbued with masculinist associations. We explore how social processes link technical expertise to gendered domains, and how ideas about gender are shaped in turn by the resulting technologies. Students explore how American gender roles from the 19th century to the present¿as they intersect with race, class, and sexuality¿are constructed with and through technologies in order to better understand the masculinist defaults of the tech industry in the Silicon Valley.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

SOC 124D: The Intuition of Social Research

Understanding the intuition behind key statistics in social science research. The focus will be on reverse-engineering statistical tests by starting with asking what information we would need to answer questions about social life. From here, we will find that apparently complicated statistical tests are simply following the same logic necessary to reach conclusions about social life. Nearly all statistical tests start from the foundations of probability sampling, mean group differences, and variability. With these foundational concepts, students will understand the intuition behind (and similarity between) standard t-tests and the mechanics of multivariate regressions. By focusing on providing students with a firm grasp of the basic foundations of statistics, students will be better prepared to understand the purpose and logic of more complex statistical tests, which serve to answer social science¿s most interesting questions.
Last offered: Summer 2016

SOC 124VP: Social Inequalities and Poverty in Latin America with focus on Brazil (SOC 224VP)

The central goal of this course is to promote an academic debate and knowledge exchange about social inequalities and poverty in Latin America, with an emphasis on Brazil, analyzing their impact on the scope of politics, the design of social policies and the interests of society. It is based on an analysis of Angus Deaton's work (Nobel Prize in Economics, 2015), that develops an economic-historical study and points out the great economic and social transformations that affect the process of evolution of social and health inequalities. Thus, what is proposed here is an analysis of the mutation of inequalities throughout the history of humanity. Deaton's relevant contribution is his approach to the process of overcoming inequalities and poverty over the last three centuries. His work demonstrates that, although the advances in terms of economic growth and quality of life have been extraordinary, there are inequalities between different regions and countries around the world. From this co more »
The central goal of this course is to promote an academic debate and knowledge exchange about social inequalities and poverty in Latin America, with an emphasis on Brazil, analyzing their impact on the scope of politics, the design of social policies and the interests of society. It is based on an analysis of Angus Deaton's work (Nobel Prize in Economics, 2015), that develops an economic-historical study and points out the great economic and social transformations that affect the process of evolution of social and health inequalities. Thus, what is proposed here is an analysis of the mutation of inequalities throughout the history of humanity. Deaton's relevant contribution is his approach to the process of overcoming inequalities and poverty over the last three centuries. His work demonstrates that, although the advances in terms of economic growth and quality of life have been extraordinary, there are inequalities between different regions and countries around the world. From this contextualization, the aim of this course is to discuss a contemporary approach to social development centered on the ideas of Amartya Sen (Nobel Prize in Economics, 1998), with a focus on capabilities. Sen's innovative perspective establishes that development should be centered on individuals¿ freedom of choice.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

SOC 125: Sociology of Religion

The social patterns of religious belief and practice, and the classical and contemporary theoretical approaches to understanding these patterns. Topics: churches, sects and cults, sources of religious pluralism, relationships between religion and aspects of social structures including the economy, class structure, ethnicity, social networks, and the state.
Last offered: Winter 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 125D: Sociology of Learning

Learn how to learn. We spend considerable time learning in school, yet we devote comparatively little time to investigating the learning process. This course uses a variety of learning situations to interrogate how we learn, understand how our social environment shapes the process, and refine our own unique learning styles. We employ project-based, experiential methods to enhance the exploration of core sociological concepts that affect learning, such as status, authority, and norms. Emphasis is placed on the social construction of specific contexts for learning such as school, work, and even the artist¿s studio. Students develop learning skills that are transferable to other classes and non-school contexts.
Last offered: Summer 2015

SOC 126: Introduction to Social Networks (SOC 226)

(Graduate students register for 226.) Theory, methods, and research. Concepts such as density, homogeneity, and centrality; applications to substantive areas. The impact of social network structure on individuals and groups in areas such as communities, neighborhoods, families, work life, and innovations.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Hahn, M. (PI)

SOC 127: Bargaining, Power, and Influence in Social Interaction (SOC 227)

(Graduate students register for 227.) Research and theoretical work on bargaining, social influence, and issues of power and justice in social settings such as teams, work groups, and organizations. Theoretical approaches to the exercise of power and influence in social groups and related issues in social interaction such as the promotion of cooperation, effects of competition and conflict, negotiation, and intergroup relations. Enrollment limited to 40.
Last offered: Autumn 2006 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 128: Introduction to Social Network Analysis (SOC 228)

(Graduate students register for SOC 228.) Theory and methods of network analysis in sociology (with an emphasis on social movements), anthropology, history, social psychology, economics, political science, and public health. Prerequisite: basic mathematics.
Last offered: Autumn 2010

SOC 129X: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 112, EDUC 212, SOC 229X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED

SOC 130: Education and Society (EDUC 120C, EDUC 220C, SOC 230)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Ramirez, F. (PI)
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