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61 - 70 of 316 results for: SOC

SOC 121VP: Family and Society: A Comparative Approach (Israel & the US) (JEWISHST 132VP, SOC 221VP)

Families are changing: Non-marital partnerships such as cohabitation are becoming more common, marriage is delayed and fertility is declining. In this class we will learn about how families are changing in Israel and we will compare with the US and other countries. Reading materials include general theories as well as research published in scholarly journals. nnAfter reviewing general theories and major scholarly debates concerning issues of family change, we will turn to specific family processes and compare Israel, the US and other countries. We will ask how family transitions may differ for different population groups and at different stages of the life course, and we will tie family processes to current theories of gender. nnWe will cover a wide range of topics, from marriage and marital dissolution to cohabitation, LAT and remarriage. We will also discuss changes in women's labor force participation and how it bears on fertility, parenthood and household division of labor. Within each substantive topic we will survey the debates within contemporary scholarship and we will compare Israel and the US
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

SOC 122D: Free Speech and Inclusion on Campus (AMSTUD 122D)

How do we balance norms of inclusion and respect with norms of free speech? This seminar course utilizes readings from sociology, political science, and legal/ethical reasoning to elucidate the larger structures and ideals that are at stake in the debates over what kind of speech is tolerable, or more normatively speaking, desirable, at colleges and universities. The expected learning outcomes are: a greater understanding of the free speech's role in American society and democracy, how America's position on free speech compares to other countries, and how speech restriction and liberties can reveal larger patterns in social structure and agency. Finally, key skills students will develop are learning how to identify common ethical frameworks that academic and popular authors use and how to analyze the origins of and changes in social institutions and social structures.
| UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI

SOC 123: Sex and Love in Modern U.S. Society (FEMGEN 123, SOC 223)

Social influences on private intimate relations involving romantic love and sexuality. Topics include the sexual revolution, contraception, dating, hook-ups, cohabitation, sexual orientation, and changing cultural meanings of marriage, gender, and romantic love.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender

SOC 124: Gender and Technology

Gender and Technology historicizes the process through which technical skills and modern-day American computing technologies have been imbued with masculinist associations. We explore how social processes link technical expertise to gendered domains, and how ideas about gender are shaped in turn by the resulting technologies. Students explore how American gender roles from the 19th century to the present¿as they intersect with race, class, and sexuality¿are constructed with and through technologies in order to better understand the masculinist defaults of the tech industry in the Silicon Valley.
Last offered: Spring 2020

SOC 124D: The Intuition of Social Research

Understanding the intuition behind key statistics in social science research. The focus will be on reverse-engineering statistical tests by starting with asking what information we would need to answer questions about social life. From here, we will find that apparently complicated statistical tests are simply following the same logic necessary to reach conclusions about social life. Nearly all statistical tests start from the foundations of probability sampling, mean group differences, and variability. With these foundational concepts, students will understand the intuition behind (and similarity between) standard t-tests and the mechanics of multivariate regressions. By focusing on providing students with a firm grasp of the basic foundations of statistics, students will be better prepared to understand the purpose and logic of more complex statistical tests, which serve to answer social science¿s most interesting questions.
Last offered: Summer 2016

SOC 124VP: Social Inequalities and Poverty in Latin America with focus on Brazil (SOC 224VP)

The central goal of this course is to promote an academic debate and knowledge exchange about social inequalities and poverty in Latin America, with an emphasis on Brazil, analyzing their impact on the scope of politics, the design of social policies and the interests of society. It is based on an analysis of Angus Deaton's work (Nobel Prize in Economics, 2015), that develops an economic-historical study and points out the great economic and social transformations that affect the process of evolution of social and health inequalities. Thus, what is proposed here is an analysis of the mutation of inequalities throughout the history of humanity. Deaton's relevant contribution is his approach to the process of overcoming inequalities and poverty over the last three centuries. His work demonstrates that, although the advances in terms of economic growth and quality of life have been extraordinary, there are inequalities between different regions and countries around the world. From this co more »
The central goal of this course is to promote an academic debate and knowledge exchange about social inequalities and poverty in Latin America, with an emphasis on Brazil, analyzing their impact on the scope of politics, the design of social policies and the interests of society. It is based on an analysis of Angus Deaton's work (Nobel Prize in Economics, 2015), that develops an economic-historical study and points out the great economic and social transformations that affect the process of evolution of social and health inequalities. Thus, what is proposed here is an analysis of the mutation of inequalities throughout the history of humanity. Deaton's relevant contribution is his approach to the process of overcoming inequalities and poverty over the last three centuries. His work demonstrates that, although the advances in terms of economic growth and quality of life have been extraordinary, there are inequalities between different regions and countries around the world. From this contextualization, the aim of this course is to discuss a contemporary approach to social development centered on the ideas of Amartya Sen (Nobel Prize in Economics, 1998), with a focus on capabilities. Sen's innovative perspective establishes that development should be centered on individuals¿ freedom of choice.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

SOC 125: Sociology of Religion

The social patterns of religious belief and practice, and the classical and contemporary theoretical approaches to understanding these patterns. Topics: churches, sects and cults, sources of religious pluralism, relationships between religion and aspects of social structures including the economy, class structure, ethnicity, social networks, and the state.
Last offered: Winter 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 125D: Sociology of Learning

Learn how to learn. We spend considerable time learning in school, yet we devote comparatively little time to investigating the learning process. This course uses a variety of learning situations to interrogate how we learn, understand how our social environment shapes the process, and refine our own unique learning styles. We employ project-based, experiential methods to enhance the exploration of core sociological concepts that affect learning, such as status, authority, and norms. Emphasis is placed on the social construction of specific contexts for learning such as school, work, and even the artist¿s studio. Students develop learning skills that are transferable to other classes and non-school contexts.
Last offered: Summer 2015

SOC 126: Introduction to Social Networks (SOC 226)

(Graduate students register for 226.) Theory, methods, and research. Concepts such as density, homogeneity, and centrality; applications to substantive areas. The impact of social network structure on individuals and groups in areas such as communities, neighborhoods, families, work life, and innovations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 126D: Wellbeing and Society

All societies have had some notion of what makes for a good life. The scientific study of wellbeing, however, is relatively new. As our capacity to collect data about people grows, our understanding of who is well and who is not is also rapidly evolving. Today, we understand wellbeing as having many dimensions, encompassing happiness, purpose, pleasure, health, income, social connection, and inclusion. What determines how individuals fare in these domains of life? How can we improve our collective and individual wellbeing? In this course, we will learn how our ability to pursue wellbeing is shaped by social factors, such as inequality, social networks, culture, government, and markets. We will draw on empirical research and case studies in sociology, psychology, anthropology, and economics. This course largely focuses on the US, but we will also discuss research from other countries in order to develop an appreciation for the role of social context in shaping wellbeing. Class discussions and assignments will focus on applying insights from academic scholarship to understand current social problems, including the COVID-19 epidemic and its consequences for society.
Last offered: Summer 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
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