2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

281 - 290 of 308 results for: SOC

SOC 372: Theoretical Analysis and Research Design

Restricted to Sociology Doctoral students only and required for Ph.D. in Sociology. This seminar is designed to deepen students¿ understanding of the epistemological foundations of social science, the construction and analysis of theories, and the design of empirical research.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Willer, R. (PI)

SOC 374: Philanthropy and Civil Society (EDUC 374, POLISCI 334)

Cross-listed with Law ( LAW 781), Political Science ( POLISCI 334) and Sociology ( SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

SOC 375W: Workshop: Politics, Morality, and Hierarchy

Advanced research workshop with a focus on new theory and research, recent publications, and current research by faculty and graduate student participants. Topics of relevant research include, but are not restricted to, morality, cooperation, solidarity, politics, status, and power. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Willer, R. (PI)

SOC 376: Perspectives on Organization and Environment: Social Movement Organizations and Environments

This course examines the interaction between organizations and their environments. It is given every year by a different faculty member. What follows is the description of the course for the academic year 2012-13: This research seminar explores recent theory and research on social movement organizations and their environments. We'll consider the way in which organizational theories help us to explain social movement phenomena, and the way in which social movement theories help us to explain organizational phenomena.
Last offered: Autumn 2012

SOC 376A: Ethnographic and Fieldwork Methods

This graduate level seminar is the first of an intensive two-quarter-long course in ethnographic and fieldwork methods. Students will receive hands-on training in the epistemology, theory, methods, and politics of fieldwork. This begins by learning how to critically engage ethnographic and qualitative books and articles. Next, students will become acquainted with field research techniques and issues through a number of class exercises. Students will learn the dynamics of gaining access, building rapport, writing field notes, crafting memos, and executing various modes of analyses. Finally, students will begin conducting their own fieldwork research in a field site of their choosing. Students should plan to spend at least five hours per week in the field, write and submit formal field notes, and craft a final paper that analyzes their fieldwork data. Class session will be divided in two parts. First, students will discuss the readings and topics of the week. The remainder of the class will be devoted to discussing research experiences and/or analyzing fellow students¿ field notes. Students should anticipate producing an article or chapter length research paper by the end of the second quarter of the class.nnnPriority given to Graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Stuart, F. (PI)

SOC 376B: Ethnographic and Fieldwork Methods

This graduate level seminar is the first of an intensive two-quarter-long course in ethnographic and fieldwork methods. Students will receive hands-on training in the epistemology, theory, methods, and politics of fieldwork. This begins by learning how to critically engage ethnographic and qualitative books and articles. Next, students will become acquainted with field research techniques and issues through a number of class exercises. Students will learn the dynamics of gaining access, building rapport, writing field notes, crafting memos, and executing various modes of analyses. Finally, students will begin conducting their own fieldwork research in a field site of their choosing. Students should plan to spend at least five hours per week in the field, write and submit formal field notes, and craft a final paper that analyzes their fieldwork data. Class session will be divided in two parts. First, students will discuss the readings and topics of the week. The remainder of the class will be devoted to discussing research experiences and/or analyzing fellow students¿ field notes. Students should anticipate producing an article or chapter length research paper by the end of the second quarter of the class.nnnPriority given to Graduate students¿
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Stuart, F. (PI)

SOC 377: Comparing Institutional Forms: Public, Private, and Nonprofit (EDUC 377, GSBGEN 346, PUBLPOL 317)

For students interested in the nonprofit sector, those in the joint Business and Education program, and for Public Policy MA students. The focus is on the missions, functions, and capabilities of nonprofit, public, and private organizations, and the managerial challenges inherent in the different sectors. Focus is on sectors with significant competition among institutional forms, including health care, social services, the arts, and education. Sources include scholarly articles, cases, and historical materials.
Last offered: Spring 2012

SOC 378: Seminar on Institutional Theory and World Society

Sociological analyses of the rise and impact of the expanded modern world order, with its internationalized organizations and globalized discourse. Consequences for national and local society: education, political organization, economic structure, the environment, and science. The centrality of the individual and the rationalized organization as legitimated actors.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5
Instructors: Meyer, J. (PI)

SOC 379: Methods for Network Analysis

In this course, we learn how to collect and analyze social network data. We begin by learning the fundamentals of graph theory and replicating well-known network studies. In the process, we cover classic network methods from centrality to block-modeling. We then move to the frontiers of network analysis. Topics include visualization, modeling and simulation, dynamic network analysis, network experiments, semantic network analysis, and analyzing social networks at scale. Sources and ways of collecting network data will be discussed and students will apply methods they learn to data of their own.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5

SOC 380: Qualitative Methods

Priority to Sociology doctoral students. Emphasis is on observational and interview-based research. Limited enrollment.
Last offered: Winter 2017
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints